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Author Topic: Type II Diabetes - Discuss  (Read 159 times)

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Offline Vulcanbill

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Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« on: July 11, 2019, 11:50:53 AM »
Do you know someone who has it?  How is it going?  How did it go? 
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Online stevent

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Re: Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2019, 12:56:08 PM »
Mine is controlled by diet. Very very minimal carbs, sugars and no processed food. Before that I was on insulin and Glimpride and still losing ground, after going low carb I don't use any medication, lost 60lbs and my A1c is around 5. Diet is the key. No wheat gluten, No bread, no bakery stuff like crackers and bagels, most root vegetables are carb dense so minimal rice or potatos etc. no fruit other than a small amount of berries. Basically meat, fish and chicken and leafy greens. 

It's a lifestyle change but I feel a lot better and no medication so it's certainly worth it. Works for me anyway.
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Online HipGnosis

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Re: Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2019, 01:00:28 PM »
I have it
I'm doing ... well, it depends who you ask. 
I say I'm doing pretty well.  I know what I can't eat (w/o adjusting what else I eat that day), what I can have a little of and what I can have all I care to.   Atkins made low carb (sugars) diet popular so there are quite a few books, foods & websites, and hundreds of recipes online. 
I take 3 pills a day - it should be one or two, but the current Rx is 3, w/o any real reason.
I do NOT stick myself and take my blood glucose (sugar).  I have the stuff to do it.  See above.
The Drs keep saying I could do better and if I don't it'll get worse.   It's been .. wow..  8 yrs.

My biggest problem (since the initial diet adjustment) has been changing insurance and therefor Drs.
My ins. has changed 5 times, so 5 new Drs...

Is there anything more you want to ask / know?
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Online Papa Lazarou

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Re: Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2019, 01:14:25 PM »
several of my patients have it. read Stevent's post. It is often reversible, with diet control.
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Online maddjack

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Re: Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2019, 01:22:34 PM »
Do you know someone who has it?  How is it going?  How did it go?
Diet, keep weight down, and exercise, walking is a huge help, it isn't like you need to live at the gym.I was dancing with it now have sugar under control by doing those few things.
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Offline thatguy

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Re: Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2019, 05:35:29 PM »
Borderline.....PreDiabetes......whatever they're calling it this week. Controlled with diet and action no meds needed. My father's side of the family has been decimated by Type 1 diabetes since I was a kid and always knew it would arrive eventually. Doc says thing are good and I keep an eye on blood glucose. Small changes equal big results for me at least. If you've been diagnosed do something know it is an evil thing and can ruin your life before it snuffs it out.
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Offline BuckeyeRider

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Re: Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2019, 06:57:35 PM »
When I was diagnosed, my A1c was somewhere around 11. That's bad. Really fucking bad.

Went on drugs, cut our carbs and got it under control, but I was slowly needing to increase dosages.

Went on a basically zero carb diet (meat, veggies, protein shakes) and started running. Lost 100 pounds and got off all meds (type 2 meds and BP meds). A1c came in at 5.3 around then, which is basically normal to really good.

Got divorced and started enjoying myself a little too much, got injured, stopped running, never really got back to it. Ended up in ER with stupid high BP and my A1c was back up too high (just under 7 as I recall). Went back on meds, cut back on carbs and got it all under control.

Back to where I'm looking to add meds/increase dosage to keep it under control. Not real happy about that, so I've very recently bought some new running shoes/shorts and I have to get back it.

If you're borderline, you can probably just make some tweaks to your lifestyle and keep it at bay. Once you've broken your metabolism, it's always sitting there just waiting for you to fuck up again.

Low carb and high fiber work. I've controlled it being a meat-atarian and a vegan both. Neither works forever unless you're also keeping your weight in check and exercising pretty much daily (once you're broken....)

If you are borderline, I'd highly recommend cutting out bread, pastries, chips, pretzels, high starch veggies like potatoes and corn. And take a LONG walk after every meal, at a minimum.

If its new to you (or whoever you're asking for) don't believe me about the carbs. Buy a meter and test yourself after every meal. Keep a simple log of your what you ate and what your blood sugar level was an hour or two after every meal. Your meter will quickly show you what's what.

Online stevent

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Re: Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2019, 09:36:55 AM »
Buy a meter and test yourself after every meal. Keep a simple log of your what you ate and what your blood sugar level was an hour or two after every meal. Your meter will quickly show you what's what.


That's key for me, I test twice a day roughly 12 hours apart to try to keep an accurate count of what's going on. I'll have a treat now and then but I know it'll show up and it does. Every once in a while I'll have a sneaker reading and have to figure WTF was that from but it'll be down to something I ate or drank.

Diabetes will definitely fuck your shit up if you don't stay on top of it.
"Sure I get the best parking spots, but who could love a man with a wooden leg and a face like a chickens arse?"

Online Bounce

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Re: Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2019, 12:06:58 PM »
I got diagnosed days after cataract surgery last year (I'm 64). The call was "DON'T HAVE THE SURGERY!" (literally, that urgent.)  I reminded them they had drawn blood on Friday with special arrangements because of the 10am Tuesday surgery and they normally didn't do Fridays. The call happened Wednesday at 6pm. The surgical team said that they do the diabetic precautions on all their patients so I was cool.

2 Metformin's twice a day. No blood sampling prescribed so no sticky-pokey. Diet and exercise have helped me lose 50 pounds in the last 6 months. Last Dr visit and the blood work shows such improvement and good numbers that they cut the Metformin to 1 twice a day. When the training nurse-practitioner asked about me testing, I explained no one had ever said I needed it. The Dr then explained that I was a great example of a motivated and "well read" patient and how Type2 could be done with less medication if the patient carries the weight of responsibility.

OTOH my Sister-in-Law has it and is now wider than tall, still eats fried everything, has to test her blood all the time, and is on the ragged edge of the next phase (insulin?). My Son-in-Law's mother had it and lost a foot because she didn't take her destiny in her own hands[1]; expecting Dr's to do her work for her. My maternal grandmother was Type1 and took insulin from as early as I can remember.

With that kind of personal experience of those in my extended family, I'm determined to get completely off the metformin. The Dr said it's harder to get off it than avoid it in the first place. I suspect it means that the biannual checkups show a stable trend of in-spec readings and maybe down to 1 pill once a day then work to none (but I'm not the medical expert).

Carbs and sugars are a big deal to fighting it off. Carbs are converted to sugars so you have to look at them as the same thing except processed sugar is faster absorbing so initially worse.

I use MyFitnessPal and pay the extra to run their "heart healthy" diet option. More than anything else, this is an educational tool that works even better if you use it to plug in things BEFORE you eat them. It can then warn you away from a choice before it's "too late".

I cut out ALL sodas (diet sodas are super high in sodium), snacks like chips and candies/cookies/etc., and even many of the "heart healthy" snacks like "veggie chips" because they are often high in sodium or fat. You can learn what can fill you for less "cost" toward your daily limits compared to quick-fun things that don't leave you full for as long but are high in total costs toward those limits. You can be full and still well-below your daily limits of hungry while already maxed out. Your choice.

1. Seems the mechanism of amputation in diabetics is not unlike that of those with leprosy. Nephropathy can set in on hands and feet so that you don't feel it when you get an injury. The cut can get infected (which you also then don't feel). That infection can move into the bones and viola(!) amputation. This is another thing that walking can make HUGE benefits in fighting off.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2019, 12:23:10 PM by Bounce »

Offline Baxter

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Re: Type II Diabetes - Discuss
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2019, 07:22:09 PM »
Diabetes runs in my Mom's family. After her diabetic brother had a leg amputated, my Mom went to to the docs and decided to get on a new track.  That day she threw out her cigarettes, and started a diet and exercise plan to lose about 30 pounds.  My Dad and I called this the Summer from Hell (I was still in high school and living at home).  It took several months until she stabilized at her new normal via cold turkey and abstinence.  During that time we couldn't do anything right, and the dog was even in trouble.  But her willpower was overwhelming, and she kept to these changes all the rest of her life. This likely is why she delayed diabetes for over 20 years, and only had mild symptoms when it finally hit.  At that time, she started rigorously monitoring glucose and carefully watched the labels on foods for hidden sugars, etc.  She eventually died of pneumonia, but her mind was sharp and her body otherwise well and intact.

My Uncle also lost his other leg, he developed kidney failure and needed dialysis, and eventually died of a nasty infection.  Maybe his diabetes was a worse case than my Mom's, but maybe when the docs said to quit smoking, he shouldn't have taken up chew.  It's the nicotine that harms circulation and poor circulation results in unstoppable infections and renal disease.  You get nicotine from chew as well as from smoking.  The last years of his life were unpleasant.

So, my advise is to follow what the docs say and PUT THE WORK IN.  Living with diabetes can seem like a full-time job.  But if you do the work, you may earn a happy and healthy life.  If you don't do what the docs say, maybe you will earn a short and unhappy life. 
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