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Online Vulcanbill

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Understanding Glock...?
« on: December 24, 2013, 09:01:14 AM »
I've not been a fan as my first experience many years ago was not a positive one.  But clearly the world will go on without me so I'm trying to gain an understanding.  But zoinks do they have a lot going on.  Can someone give me the Cliffs notes version?  What's with the different numbers, letters and generations?  If I try to read every description of every gun it will jumble together leaving me as confused as I was ignorant.  Break it down for the dummy, please. 

For a little more understanding of what I'm after, I'm basically after something that will make a good ccw and have good accessory support.  I like the idea of good stopping power but I don't necessarily want to give up capacity.  I also don't need the tiniest micro gun out there.  I'm just wondering if the Glock is the way to meet those criteria easily. 

My next fun gun will probably be a baby eagle / Jericho as I really like the feel and don't care about aftermarket for a fun gun so I don't have much of an interest in Glock for other than ccw purposes. 
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Offline SuperHans

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Re: Understanding Glock...?
« Reply #1 on: December 24, 2013, 09:05:44 AM »
Basically they have three different frame sizes: Standard, compact, and sub-compact each in a different caliber. The number designation is just the caliber/frame size for the most part. That is the simplest way to look at it.

Here's the chart:

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Offline SuperHans

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Re: Understanding Glock...?
« Reply #2 on: December 24, 2013, 09:18:45 AM »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glock

Product evolution

Glock has updated its basic design several times throughout its production history. Commentators had long separated the large changes into generations. Glock eventually accepted this nomenclature with their "Gen4" models.

Second generation models

A mid-life upgrade to the Glock pistols involved the addition of checkering on the front strap and serrations to the back strap. These versions were introduced in 1988 and were informally referred to as "second generation" models. To meet American ATF regulations, a steel plate with a stamped serial number was embedded into the receiver in front of the trigger guard.

In 1991, an integrated recoil spring assembly replaced the original two-piece recoil spring and tube design. The magazine was slightly modified, changing the floorplate and fitting the follower spring with a resistance insert at its base.

Third generation models

In the late 1990s, the frame was further modified with an accessory rail (called the "Universal Glock rail") to allow the mounting of laser sights, tactical lights, and other accessories. Thumb rests on both sides of the frame and finger grooves on the front strap were added. Glock pistols with these upgrades are informally referred to as (early) "third generation" models. Later third generation models additionally featured a modified extractor that serves as a Loaded chamber indicator, and the locking block was enlarged, along with the addition of an extra cross pin to aid the distribution of forces exerted by the locking block. This cross pin is known as the locking block pin and located above the trigger pin.[20]

The polymer frames of third generation models can be black, flat dark earth or olive drab. Besides that, non-firing dummy pistols ("R" models) have a bright red frame and Simunition-adapted practice pistols ("T" models) – a bright blue frame for easy identification.[21]

In 2009, the Glock 22 RTF2 (Rough Textured Frame 2) (chambered in .40 S&W) was introduced. This pistol featured a new checkering texture around the grip and new scalloped (fish gill shaped) serrations at the rear of the sides of the slide.[22][23]

Fourth Generation models

Comparison of "third" (left) and "fourth" generation (right) Glock 19 grip frames
Glock 17 Gen4 as issued by the British Armed Forces under the L131A1 General Service Pistol designationAt the 2010 SHOT Show, Glock presented the "fourth generation", now dubbed "Gen4" by Glock itself. Updates centered on ergonomics and the recoil spring assembly. Some parts of fourth generation Glock pistols cannot be interchanged with those of the previous generations. The initial two fourth generation models announced were the full-size Glock 17 and Glock 22, chambered for the 9×19mm Parabellum and .40 S&W cartridges, respectively. The pistols were displayed with a modified rough texture frame, grip checkering, and interchangeable backstraps of different sizes. "Gen4" is rollmarked on the slide next to the model number to identify the fourth generation pistols.

The basic grip size of the fourth generation Glock pistols is slightly smaller compared to the previous design. A punch is provided to remove the standard trigger housing pin and replace it for the longer cross pin needed to mount the medium or large backstrap that will increase the trigger distance by 2 mm (0.079 in) or 4 mm (0.16 in). With the medium backstrap installed, the grip size is identical to the third generation pistols. The magazine release catches are enlarged and reversible for left-handed use. To utilize the exchangeable magazine release feature, fourth generation Glock magazines have two notches cut on both sides of the magazine body.[24]

Mechanically, fourth generation Glock pistols are fitted with a dual recoil spring assembly to help reduce perceived recoil and increase service life expectancy. Earlier subcompact Glock models such as the Glock 26 and Glock 30 have already used a dual recoil spring assembly which was carried over to the fourth generation versions of those models. The slide and barrel shelf have been resized, and the front portion of the polymer frame has been widened and internally enlarged, in order to accommodate the dual recoil spring assembly. The trigger mechanism housing has also been modified to fit into the smaller sized grip space.[25][26][27][28][29]

The introduction of fourth generation Glock pistols continued in July 2010 when the Glock 19 and Glock 23, the reduced size "compact" versions of the Glock 17 and Glock 22, became available for retail.[30] In late 2010 Glock continued the introduction of fourth generation models with the Glock 26 and Glock 27 "subcompact" variants.

In January 2013 more fourth generation Glock pistols were introduced commercially during the annual SHOT Show including the Glock 20 Generation 4 along with other fourth generation Glock models.


Online R Doug

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Re: Understanding Glock...?
« Reply #3 on: December 24, 2013, 09:33:22 AM »
FYI... this is the best review I've seen on why or why not to purchase a Glock.

There are some excellent details given regarding ease of use and (as noted) aftermarket modifications.


http://www.luckygunner.com/lounge/make-up-your-mind-monday-glock-vs-sw-mp/
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Offline Royal Tiger

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Re: Understanding Glock...?
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2013, 09:44:48 AM »
I've never been much of a Glock fan myself.  They are decent guns though.  I lean SIG/Sauer and H&K over Glock and S&W.  I like S&W revolvers, but didn't like any of the semi-autos I tried.

One maybe minor thing about Glock that flat out annoys me is that they refuse to put anyone else's name on any of their precious firearms.  .45 ACP (automatic Colt pistol) is just ".45 Auto".  .357 SIG is just ".357 Auto".  .40 S&W is merely ".40 Auto".  Seems incredibly childish to me.
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Offline giaka

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Re: Understanding Glock...?
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2013, 10:21:22 AM »


For a little more understanding of what I'm after, I'm basically after something that will make a good ccw and have good accessory support. I like the idea of good stopping power but I don't necessarily want to give up capacity.  I also don't need the tiniest micro gun out there.  I'm just wondering if the Glock is the way to meet those criteria easily. 


Get a Gen2 or better G19 and call it a day.   :bigok:
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Offline SuperHans

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Re: Understanding Glock...?
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2013, 11:12:59 AM »
I've never been much of a Glock fan myself.  They are decent guns though.  I lean SIG/Sauer and H&K over Glock and S&W.  I like S&W revolvers, but didn't like any of the semi-autos I tried.

While I find both SIG and H&K to be both very fine weapons, I just can't see spending that kind of money on them. Price versus performance over a Glock just isn't worth it in my mind. I'm far from an expert, but it seems a lot of big names have no problems shooting the Glock or S&W. I think both brands are very popular because they offer performance at the right price point.

I hated the older S&W auto I shot years ago. My buddy had one and it just felt sloppy. From what I remember, the slide rattled around when you were holding it in your hand although it shot fine. I do like the newer M&P line though.

Offline Formerly Known as Bigfoot

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Re: Understanding Glock...?
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2013, 02:11:21 PM »
We went to the Glock at the PD back around 1990.  I've carried the 9mm, 40 then the 45 (G 21) for the last ten years before retiring in 09.  I carried a S&W revolver then a Taurus and a Sig before we all had to go to Glock.  I have to say that the Glock(s) were by far the most dependable guns I have ever fired.  Not one single stove pipe, failure to feed and so on with the Glocks.  Can't say the same with my previous semi's or with the ones others would use on the range.  I've gone to a Kimber 1911 and this is now my go to gun.  The only Glock I currently own is the Mod 30 which is just too small for my hands.  I wished I'd never got rid of the Mod 21.
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