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Offline CLAY

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James Bay Road, an amazing adventure
« on: November 10, 2013, 02:46:45 PM »
I'm moving this RR from '10 over here just in case.  I don't want to risk losing it.

The trip to James Bay.  What an adventure- what an experience.  I guess I’ll start at the beginning.

We were scheduled to leave my place at 5 am- Derek (Maxman on a FJR) was late, Jeff (Boov on a CBR XX) overslept thanks to his kids screwing with his alarm clock.  We wound up heading out around 5:45- not a bad start.  Marc, Mat, and Cal left Friday after work.  We were going to meet up with them somewhere on the way up to the Bay- we had more range with faster bikes, so we’d catch them eventually.  Marc rides a VTX1300, Mat rides a Connie 1K, and Cal ride my old 1986 Honda Shadow- VT700C.  Great bike.  I miss it.

Anyway, here’s a shot of my Bandit 1200S loaded and ready to go.  Note the big tank I made three years ago thinking of this trip someday:
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When you commute every day by bike, you tend to “zone in” to the smells and sights you come across; the farm here, the factory there, the lawns being mowed in another place.  It gets to be regular- if I wasn’t on a bike, I’d say boring.  Taking a trip is different.  It is new- it is fresh- and I knew I’d be on some roads I hadn’t been on on a bike, and many roads I’d never been on. 

As we left we headed up US131 north out of Grand Rapids, the usual “going north” speed route.  Being a married father of two youngsters (Maggie 7 and Christian 4), time is a factor- there are better ways up Michigan, but none faster.  Having ridden the better, this morning we opted for the faster.

The first new route took us off US 131 at Reed City, then across 10 to US 17 north- a slightly longer route than the usually M55, but a new one at Jeff’s suggestion; a typical nice country two-lane highway.  We passed farms and fields and the occasional fresh-cut hay field.  Growing up on a farm, nothing brings back memories like the smell of fresh cut hay.  I love it.  It was a warm, sunny day, and things were awesome the first hour into the trip.

Catching US 127 north, eventually it merged into I-75; we fueled and had breakfast in Gaylord at some mom & pop place.  Nice grub.  Here’s a pic:
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Next stop:  Sault Ste Marie and the Canadian border.  On the way, of course we crossed the “Mighty Mac”.  I recoreded the whole crossing with a little camera work.  At this point my video camera wasn’t working, so I shot this with my RAM mounted digital Kodak.  Yes, we did cross the whole thing on the metal grate.  I have crossed it probably six or so times by bike.  Riding on the grate is scary at first, until you understand what is going to happen.  The scary part is that your bike will wander and weave a bit- it does that on the grate.  If you cross these things you learn to relax and just let it wander a bit- it is stable and safe, and it will be OK.  For those of you that have never been on the Mighty Mac, it is a big bridge- one of the longest in the world.  I shot some video through the grate at the water below as well.  Here’s the video:

bridge crossing.MOV


Next we made the 50 minute ride to the Sault Ste Marie- “The Soo”.  We stopped for gas:
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Planted the MI phototag at Lake Superior State, and headed across.  We stopped at the duty free for some sleeping aids on the way in, and had an uneventful entrance into Canada.

Leaving the Soo, we took 17 across to 129.  I have taken this route many times heading north to fish in Canada, but never by bike.  We took 17 in reverse when we circled Lakes Erie, Huron, and Ontario, but never 129.  Canadian 129, is, well, the Canadian version of 129 (the Dragon).  It is a bit rougher, not as curvy, and surrounded by cliffs, rivers, and lakes.  I always thought it would be a great run on a bike, and it was.  At this point I had the video camera RAM mounted and working, so I shot some video.  You’ll get the idea:
129 in.MP4


After gassing in Chapleau, we took 101 towards Timmins.  We hit some light rain here and there, so by putting on my raingear in Chapleau I assured us a dry ride to Timmins.  After getting checked into the Super 8:
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It began to rain in earnest for awhile, backing our decision to hotel instead of camp.  “Hotelling it” allowed us to leave earlier and drive later.  We had hoped to catch the other guys, but with their early start and our late start, they were ahead yet.  We ate and slept well!  The first day done.

Day two woke with nice weather- temps quickly rising from the low 50’s.  Sun in sight!  We saddled up and made the run across the border into Quebec:
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Yes, that is a cooler.  Yes, it is full.  Derek’s FJR is the hauler and the cooler fit well on his fabricated brackets on the pillion seat.  Awesome.  We could take bacon, eggs, steak, pork chops and butter.  And we did.

An interesting note that would come back later while driving the 101-388:  While driving along in an otherwise dry zone, I suddenly has a very slight mist on my visor.  It didn’t evaporate- it was a very few spots of oil.  I figured Jeff must have hit a spot on the road and sprayed it up.  He didn’t.

The 101 turns into the 388 in Quebec, and there is a variety of ways to get to Amos, our next stop.  I’m not sure which one we took, but we got there.  After gassing up in our first non-English speaking station, we hit the road again, taking the one road north to Matagami. 

Thirteen miles up the road we stopped at a park to unload some bodily fluids.  We would have asked at the gas station, but none of us were up to trying to explain what we needed to the young, non-english speaking girl at the station.  I thought about it, but every gesture I could think of to explain “Do you have a bathroom” wound up placing me in danger of police lock-up in one way or another.  Hence our ride to the small park, which of course resulted in outhouse Tomfoolery- Derek hitting on Jeff:
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Leaving the park, disaster struck.  As Jeff accelerated away from the park on his Blackbird, it erupted in smoke and oil.  My first thought was “He just blew it up!”, but I then saw it wasn’t coming from the pipes- I caught up with him and we pulled over.   After tracking the oil and gunning the engine, we found it- a hole in the oil filter!  The first spray that hit me back on the 101 must have been a slight initial leak that plugged with crap on the road- the second leak was major.  There was oil all over his bike and tire and a thin sheen all over the leading face of everything on me, including the Bandit and cases.  We pulled it apart and in the best imitation of Red Green we could do, we wrapped it in duct tape and tightened it with zip ties.  Glorioius things, those zip-ties and duct tape:
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We limped back into Amos, and wonder-of-wonders, Canadian Tire stocks the needed filter.  A couple hours of work, backtracking, more work, cleanup, and we were on our way to Matagami.

Coming in to Matagami they are working on the road- which means gravel for 10-12 miles or so.  Dry, dirty, nasty gravel.  Here’s video of the ride in:
dirt coming into Matagami.MP4


And a few pics of me after the arrival.  The pictures really don’t do it justice- thanks to the sheen of oil on everything, it all was incredibly dusty and dirt-covered.  Messy.  Oh well- I figured the next 250 miles of riding would clean me.
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Next, we stopped at the check-in station where we got a note from the other guys- camping at KM 411.  They were about 4 hours ahead of us.  A shot of us at the start of the JBR:
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And a video of the start:
start of JBR.MP4


The James Bay Road is tricky:  you have to be able to get 236 miles (381 km) to the first gas stop.  We went about this in various ways.  Cal on the Shadow carried 6 gallons in a can, Mat on the 1K Connie carried a spare gallon, Marc on the VTX 1300 carried a couple spare gallons, and they had to go 55-65 in order to get the required mileage to make it.   We were in better shape- on the Bandit I made a big tank (7+ gallons) a few years ago with  this trip in mind, Derek’s FJR had the range as-is, and Jeff on the CBR XX plumbed in a 3 gallon can with a fuel pump, so he just had to flip a switch to refill.  This meant we could run between 75 and 85 with no problems- and that 10-20 MPH makes a big difference over the 387 miles.  The other issue was the frost heaves.  The first 130 miles of the JBR has pretty bad frost heaves- 75 MPH really is the maximum speed if you want to stay in your seat, and we did.  They are many, and they are regular.  They will test your suspension like nothing ever has.

Riding along the JBR, you pass countless lakes and many rivers- but among the most powerful that is still fairly wild is the Rupert.  We were told it is lower than it was last year- but wow.  It is an amazing, wild, mighty river.  The biggest rapids you see in the pics and videos could swallow a small house.  This was a thing to be experienced- and the pictures and video do not do it justice:
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Rpuert.MP4

rupert close.MP4


Now it is time to go sleep in my own bed with my wife.  It will be nice after a six days of man-funk.   :D
« Last Edit: November 10, 2013, 03:17:20 PM by CLAY »
"Most accidents happen when the meek meet the douchebags."  -Viffergyrl
"The wider the road, the worse the food." -Coho
"Buckwheat is dead"

Offline CLAY

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Re: James Bay Road, an amazing adventure
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2013, 02:49:13 PM »
One thing I forgot to mention:  I had been told this is a very empty road- very desolate and remote.  As we made our way up, we hit lots of traffic- at least lots by what I took as JBR standards.  Every few miles we would pass groups of vehicles heading south- 5th wheels and fishermen, along with a few cars.  I was a bit disappointed by that.  It turns out there was a reason.

As we made our way north along the James Bay Road, it looked like we would be hitting some thunderheads.  The closer we rode to them, it became clear they were not Thunderheads, nor rain:
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The closer we came, the more apparent the devastation; mile upon mile of burnt trees and underbrush:
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  Long stretches of discolored asphalt with burnt “curve ahead” signs among the ruins:
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 In some places, devastation as far as you can see:
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  Finally, we were actually passing through areas where the fire still smoldered, making for many areas where you drove through the smoke:
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  And areas where you drove alongside of burning brush still not eaten by the flames:
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  This was a new experience- actual forest fire.  After a few miles we passed this, fueled up at KM 381 (mile 236), and continued on to meet at KM 411 for the night.  

  I’ll have more pics later- I know Mat took several- but at this point we were glad to be there, and we unloaded, got supper going (various “just add water” dry goods, as well as pork loin), and recounted our rides.

  It must have been the exhaustion from the ride, but as the night wore on and my whisky sours got better, the night faded away.  I woke up the next morning in my tent feeling a little worse for wear.  Cal had a rough night as well, as evidenced by his glasses:
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  No one is sure what happened, but at least my body didn’t feel violated.  Well, at least not much.
  The next morning foretold of another bluebird day, and the lot of us saddled up and rolled out to get to Radisson and our Dam Tour.  

  We were now well inside the biome known as “Taiga”, the area where trees still grow to be very old, but rarely get above ten feet due to the bitterly cold winters and poor substrate.  As a science teacher, this fascinated me, and I took many pictures to use in class.  The soil range from mossy to sandy to bare rock with jack pine and black spruce clinging to it for the little sustenance it provided.  It turns out later that’s why they allow the fires just to burn- the jack pine need the fire to pop open the cones and reproduce, and the fire renews the taiga, adding vital nutrients to the nutrient poor soil.  The road had actually been closed for the previous four days, accounting for the great number of vehicles heading south on the Sunday we rode up.  There had been a detour, but it added several hundred miles to an already long trip, and evidently many opted to wait out the fire and come down when clear.  Hydro Quebec security and police lead convoys through the heaviest parts of the fire when they finally opened the roads.  Thankfully we had arrived on the day of the road’s reopening and by the time we made it up to the fire zone the heaviest flames had passed.

We continued on, me screwing around with the camera a bit.  On day two of the James Bay Road traffic was thin indeed:
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  Rounding a bend, we came across two moose on the road.  Not a big deal, the curves are all nice sweepers and visibility is great.  I decided I would pass up to the front to catch them on video.  As I approached, one went into the brush.  I assumed the next one would as well- I was wrong.  Clearly he was heading to Radisson as well, and it would be a long journey indeed if we had to pace him the rest of the way:
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  After he jumped into the brush, tired and used up, we continued on.  A distance ahead I saw something else along side the road- a porcupine.  Running last I flipped on the camera and caught a little footage.  Clearly he was not happy with this intrusion into his day, and he spun to face me with his quills to prove the point:
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    The rest of the ride in was uneventful:
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  We made it in to Radisson, got some lunch, and began the English-speaking tour of the hydroelectric plant.  After watching a couple videos and hearing our speaker for a bit, we took a bus to to main generating station itself.  Cameras were not allowed inside, and a security guard accompanied us the entire way.  I’m not sure if this was standard procedure, or if it was because of our group of motley looking cowboys, but I was good with it either way.  

  The tour of the dam is not to be missed.  When Mat made the reservations I thought “Fine, but I’m really up there for the Bay”.  The tour was incredible.  This is engineering on an unprecedented scale.  It will blow your mined- our guide took us down into a turbine room with the 40 inch jackshaft and generator (rotor and stator) literally spinning a foot above our heads.  You could have reached up and had your fingers torn off by it.  The noise was deafening- this single turbine/gemerator combination was producing enough energy for 90,000 homes!  The shaft itself was about 40 inches in diameter, producing around 475,000 horsepower.  An incredible thing to witness- and there was a gallery full (fourteen, I think) of generators and turbines which were nearly all running.

  After leaving the generating plant itself, we went back on to the bus for a tour of the outside dams, dykes, and spillway.  Again, the engineering is amazing.  Here is the view from the top of a viewing platform:
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The view from the top of the spillway:
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The view from the bottom of the spillway:
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<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/vzp5pF8mJa0&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/vzp5pF8mJa0&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
And a short clip to show the scale of this thing.  Each step is 10 meters high:
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After the dam tour, we saddled up to head out to the Bay itself.
 To be continued...
"Most accidents happen when the meek meet the douchebags."  -Viffergyrl
"The wider the road, the worse the food." -Coho
"Buckwheat is dead"

Offline CLAY

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Re: James Bay Road, an amazing adventure
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2013, 02:51:31 PM »
One thing I neglected to mention about the whole Hydro project up there:  I have talked about the enormity of the project and the incredible engineering.  The “clean” aspect of hydroelectricity is to be applauded.  One thing I need to bring up in my mind is the simple fact of how they have massively changed the ecosystems up there.  They have drowned thousands and thousands of square miles of land.  They have changed the river ecosystem, and they have simply destroyed many other river ecosystems.  In order to drive more water into their hydro project to generate more electricity, they have dammed up many other rivers closer to the headwaters.  Once their reservoirs fill up, they divert the water over into their Hydro-reservoir.  If you ever get up there you can see this in the rivers you pass- clearly many of them are not a trickle of their former selves.  This is the basis for much of the Cree dislike for the French and Quebec Hydro.  Nothing comes for free.  Enough prattling.

  The ride from Radisson to Chisasibi is on one of the best roads up there.  Speeds up to 120 MPH are possible on its nice pavement and great sweepers- but our speeds ranged around 80:
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  I whooped her down to 100 a couple times, but it just becomes too much work requiring too much concentration- not to mention you are probably 500 miles from the nearest hospital!  I did, however, push it for a bit to get ahead of the guys so I could film them coming by:
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  The pavement ends at Chisasibi.  Clearly as long as you are not French, the Cree people are the friendliest around.  They are all English speakers and quick to talk and ask about your trip and setup, and to offer firewood or advice.  They are wonderful people- one older guy who used to be a guide told me about how they get polar bears in during the winter- mostly along the bay, but in town a couple times during the winter.  They move north with the ice flows.  The things they value are clearly different.  If you watch the video of the ride in, notice a few things.  The houses are run down on the outside- the yards are a storage place for things, yet they all drive brand new trucks.  I have to wonder about what they get from the Hydro-Quebec and if that influences all the new trucks, snowmobiles, and boat motors we saw:
<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/mWxOxckU-n0&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/mWxOxckU-n0&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
   The ride from Chisasibi to the Bay itself is one of decent gravel for about 10-15 miles.  As a former dirt rider (and Marc as a dirt rider), we didn’t have too much trouble- I knew my bike would float a bit on the rough gravel and smooth out on the hard-pack dirt.  A couple of the guys didn’t fair so well.  We should have had a conversation about what to expect on the gravel.  It’s much like crossing a bridge grate- your bike is going to float around a bit, and a little speed is your friend.  Going really slow makes it much more work- going too fast obviously has its own problems.  You find the sweet spot and ride.  If you ever go there, you take the way to the Fort George Ferry, then go straight when it turns off.  5 minutes later, you’re at the Bay.  Here’s footage of the boys coming into the bay itself.  Dirt rider Marc is the one who cheers (on the VTX):
<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/eKv5KhQn2ts&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/eKv5KhQn2ts&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
  We made it.  Of course I’m going to throw in some gratuitous shots of me at the bay with my bike, since that was the goal:
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   The Cree have a couple nice gazebos set up there- we were invited to use one and to feel free to use any wood we found for our fire.  I parked right on the Canadian Shield rock and set my tent up on a glorious bed of moss- it really was an amazing site:
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   A few more camp shots:
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   The air temp was in the low 60’s at this point, and dropping.  We opted to get on our suits and walk out into the ocean.  I’m the tan one, thanks to my summer job.  Derek and Marc dove under- at this point the air temp and the 40° water temp prohibited me from that.  Call me a pansy.  Anyway, we dried off and cooked some ribeye steaks over the fire and garlic rice on my stove for supper.  The cooler was SO worth it!
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  After supper the temps began to rapidly drop.  Several of us went to long underwear and full riding gear.  Around midnight, with the sunlight still visible in the west, we went to bed.  Thanks to my great Cabela’s sleeping bag, I was able to sleep in comfort in the 39° temps with only my long underwear, a t-shirt and a sweatshirt on.  Very comfy- but I did wake at 3 AM to note the time, temperature (39°), and the fact that it was getting light in the east.  This is why we made our plans to camp on the Bay on June 21, the summer solstice.  Very cool.
   The next morning I awoke at 6:30 with tent temps at 61° and rising quickly- another bluebird day!  The change in the temperature was amazing.  I was the first up and began to make some coffee.  We also had bacon, eggs, and pork chops:
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  Yes, the cooler proved its worth again.  One thing I would note here:  You can buy all your provisions in Chisasibi, but the prices are extremely high.  After all, the goods are shipped hundreds of miles via truck to get there.  Pics of our setup and feed:
  We then began to load up.  Some of the slower riders left early, including one with a gastro-intestinal need that could not be met by a rock or tree.  Thankfully that was no problem for me- I suppose the years of camping and hunting lend itself to that.
   I snapped a few more pictures, and Derek and I were off, leaving the Bay:
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  One more thing to note:  The frost heaves of the lower Bay Road, and the high-frequency vibrations of the gravel will test your bike to it’s utmost.  We had one rack failure on the Shadow (fixed my redistributing the load), and sever guys either lost nuts and bolts or had them come loose.  On my Bandit on the ride back, after the gravel, Derek suddenly caught up to me and waved me over- I was smoking!  Turns out my filter had spun a little loose and was leaking some oil.  A quick hand-tighten and she was good to go.  
   On the way back we decided to split up at our own paces and meet in Radisson, which was fun.  Derek and I ran it up to 100 for awhile on the straights, then paced between 80 and 90 most of the way.  Another thing to note up here:  Ride your own pace.  Always a rule to follow, this is never more important than up here.  Pushing your bike to hard could cause a mechanical failure which could cost hundreds in shipping, let alone the physical dangers of a crash.  I took it easy on the B12- I never pushed the red line, never pushed her too hard.  A mechanical failure sucks, but up there it is catastrophic.  I’m a big proponent of ride-your-own-ride, never moreso than up there.
   The Ride back to Radisson was uneventful.  In Radisson we gassed up, and split into our two groups for the ride back:
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Self portrait on the way back:
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  Jeff, Derek and I intended to get to Amos for the night.  With our ability to run at higher speeds we felt it a good goal.  Mat Marc and Cal would take a slower pace.  Mat and Marc were planning to head south to Toronto and Mat’s hometown, and they would meet us in Amos, we assumed the next day so Cal could ride home with us.
    We made the gas stop no problem, and passed through all the fire and smoke spots.  We did stop at the 52nd parallel this time- we missed it on the way up:
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  It was sunny and warm until the second long stretch- the big one.  There were some large pop-up thunder storms we had avoided thanks to the twists and turns of the road, but at the mid gas stop we geared up.  Of course, once again this insured we would stay dry.  Part way down we stopped for pictures and removing the rain gear.  
     We made it to the end of the road and checked out at the station, got gas in Matagami and headed for Amos.  15 miles of gravel again followed by a great ride to Amos.  We arrived at around 8:15, got a hotel room and some supper.  Around 11:30 we were getting ready to hit the hay, when low-and-behold in come the other riders!  They had pushed it all the way to Amos itself.  We had assumed we would sleep in, get some breakfast and meet them in the morning but they decided to make the run as well.  
     Little difference in speed make for big differences in time over long distances.  We were an hour ahead at the first gas stop, two hours ahead at the end of the James Bay Road, and about 2 ½ in Amos.  I do love my big tank and Jeff’s ability to refuel his Blackbird on the fly with the aux tank.  Of course Derek’s FJR just has range.
   After some discussion of the ride, we all hit the rack.  The next morning myself, Jeff, Derek and Cal headed for Timmins and breakfast/lunch, and Mat and Marc headed towards Toronto.  We needed one gas stop for Cal and the Shadow half way to Timmins, with which he just emptied his gas can into his tank, then we hit Timmins for lunch.
    After Timmins came Chapleau and another gas stop there, then on to the 129 south.  Once again, we missed the rian.  Clearly we had just missed big storms.  In places the roads had lots of gravel and sand washed on to them, and they were wet for probably a hundred miles.  We did stop at this sign on the 129:
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    Finally we left the arctic watershed.  We made the rest of the uneventful trip back to the Soo and crossed into the US.  Home again.  I don’t mind Canada, and I enjoyed the French (any French woman that tries to talk English just sounds so sexy!), but it is always so good to be back in the good old USA.  We got a hotel in the Soo courtesy of Jeff’s Holiday Inn bonus points (he travels a ton for work) and had a great meal in downtown Soo at a Irish Pub.  Once again, it was great to be back.  Our waitress was a great looking, friendly, American Midwestern girl, reassuring us that we were back.  We went back to the hotel, had a few drinks of our newly-purchased Duty-free beverages, and went to bed.
   The next morning dawned foggy with cloud cover.  Big storms had passed to our south the night before, and the cloud cover was still burning off.  The ride through the UP to the Mac was cloudy, but after we crossed it began to clear.  Pics this time of the crossing and the bridge:
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  We then had a couple uneventful gas stops with our last gas stop in Big Rapids.  Parting is such sweet sorrow, but I think we were all eager to get back to our loved ones.  Here is the last group pic with the four of us:
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   45 minutes later, I was home:
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What an incredible trip.  We were privileged to see an amazing part of our world, see an amazing feat of engineering, and do it with some great friends.  Someday I’d love to go back with my family when my kids are older, if they want.  It’s something to see that most people never will.

My pointers for the ride:  
1.   BE CAREFUL!  Take it easy on your bike and equipment.  You will be in one of the most remote areas you can get to in North America.
2.   Be sure your bike is in tip-top shape.  A mechanical failure can end your trip and be incredibly expensive.  
3.   Check all your nuts and bolts before you go.  They will be tested on both the gravel and the frost heaves.
4.   You don’t need much cash- VISA was taken everywhere we went.  
5.   If you are willing to pay your also can get by without much food; there is a restaurant at the mid-way gas stop and places to eat in Radisson.  There is also a store in Radisson and Chisasibi.  
6.   Have a good sleeping bag- it can get cold at night.
7.   DO NOT MISS THE TOUR!  If you go up that far you must take a tour of the hydro plant.  Call ahead and you can get an English tour (Thanks again Mat!)
8.   Be sure you can get 236 miles by carrying gas or with an aux tank, and test this with a full load on your bike.

  If you have any questions, feel free to ask me here or in a PM, I’d be glad to help.  We don’t mind distance, and I think this is the shortest time in which to do this trip.  It could take much longer if you don’t like big days in the saddle.
    I hope you enjoyed the report- it was a truly epic trip in every sense of the word.
"Most accidents happen when the meek meet the douchebags."  -Viffergyrl
"The wider the road, the worse the food." -Coho
"Buckwheat is dead"

Online st2sam

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Re: James Bay Road, an amazing adventure
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2013, 07:17:34 PM »
WHOA!
Awesome job on the report Clay, hope you share parts with your students. I loved science, it was my favorite subject, and the only one I got good grades in. :)
My wife (retired) and daughter are  teachers....

Thanks for sharing....
She's a big girl, but boy can she dance.

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Offline Stripes

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Re: James Bay Road, an amazing adventure
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2013, 07:38:46 PM »
Very cool Clay! I missed this one before. Thanks for sharing it again. Cheers
Hard work, pays off in the future. Laziness, pays off now.

Offline CLAY

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Re: James Bay Road, an amazing adventure
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2013, 09:04:07 PM »
You bet!  I have to fix all the video links, but I'll get to that later.
"Most accidents happen when the meek meet the douchebags."  -Viffergyrl
"The wider the road, the worse the food." -Coho
"Buckwheat is dead"