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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3050 on: November 30, 2020, 05:00:54 AM »
On November 30, 1954, Ann Hodges became the only known person in history to be struck by a meteorite.
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Hodges was lying on her couch in Sylacauga, Alabama and was woken up by a fallen piece of space.
The meteorite was comprised of sulphide, it weighed 8.5 pounds, and was seven inches long.
"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
“His gaze was stern, unyielding, like an Easter Island head stuck in traffic” - Dylan Moran

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3051 on: November 30, 2020, 06:15:45 AM »
And in “other news”
Nov. 30, 2003,
A block of East 2nd Street in New York City was officially renamed Joey Ramone Place. It is the block where Joey once lived with band mate Dee Dee Ramone and is near the music club CBGB, where the Ramones played their first gigs. In 2010, it was reported that "Joey Ramone Place," was New York City's most stolen sign. As of September 27, the sign has been moved to 20 feet above ground level.
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"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3052 on: December 06, 2020, 03:40:44 AM »
US Federal Judge Rules James Joyce's Ulysses Not Obscene (1933)

For more than a decade after its debut, James Joyce's masterpiece, Ulysses, was banned in the US. A literary magazine had attempted to publish it in serial form, but the series was cut short after the publishers ran a rather suggestive passage and were convicted of obscenity. When the implicit ban on the book was finally challenged in 1933, Judge John M. Woolsey praised the work for its literary merits and ruled that it was not obscene. How did a publisher force the issue to court? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3053 on: December 06, 2020, 03:41:31 AM »
 Happy Birthday Joyce Kilmer (1886)

Kilmer was a prolific poet who celebrated nature and faith in short, sentimental verse. His works, now mostly forgotten, have been dismissed by modern scholars as overly simplistic. Today, his reputation largely rests on the wide popularity of a single 1913 poem, "Trees," which begins, "I think that I shall never see / A poem lovely as a tree." Many specific trees have been proposed as Kilmer's inspiration, and the remains of one now-dead candidate were placed in storage by what institution? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3054 on: December 06, 2020, 03:42:22 AM »
Finland Independence Day

The Finnish people lived under Russian control beginning in 1809. The Finnish nationalist movement grew in the 1800s, and when the Bolsheviks took over Russia on November 7, 1917, the Finns saw a time to declare their independence. They did so on December 6 of that same year. This day is a national holiday celebrated with military parades in Helsinki and performances at the National Theater. It is traditionally a solemn occasion that begins with a parade of students carrying torches and one flag for each year of independence. More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3055 on: December 06, 2020, 06:21:27 AM »
Dec. 6, 1988
Lefty Wilbury died of a heart attack, aged 52.
AKA “Roy Orbison” he had endured a great deal of tragedy in his life.
His first wife, Claudette died in a motorcycle accident in 1966 and two of his three sons, died in a house fire.

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"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
“His gaze was stern, unyielding, like an Easter Island head stuck in traffic” - Dylan Moran

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3056 on: December 09, 2020, 06:15:04 AM »
1979. Smallpox is a thing of the past.

https://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Smallpox

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3057 on: December 12, 2020, 07:13:14 PM »
Dec. 12, 1970,
The Doors performed their last live show together, at The Warehouse in New Orleans.
https://youtu.be/WprnTN0rQMw
"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3058 on: December 14, 2020, 04:14:56 AM »

First Group of Explorers Reaches South Pole (1911)

Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen had been planning for a trip to the North Pole until he heard that someone had beaten him to it. Instead, he and his team set sail for Antarctica. There, they spent nearly a year preparing for the final two-month trek that made them the first people to reach the South Pole. With good equipment and plenty of sled dogs, the team was extremely well prepared compared to other polar expeditions of the day, some of which ended badly. How was their clothing better? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3059 on: December 14, 2020, 10:32:04 AM »
What could be better than tank tops and flip flops, maybe woolen clothing over cotton?
Freedom without regulations that protect the general good is nothing less than anarchy by the rich.

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3060 on: December 16, 2020, 02:45:24 PM »
Happy Birthday Jane Austin and Beethoven

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3061 on: December 16, 2020, 04:51:48 PM »
Listening to Herbert von Karajan and the Berliner Philharmoniker - Beethoven Symphonie #No.1
HBD, indeed!


Happy Birthday Billy Gibbons!
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3062 on: December 17, 2020, 09:55:49 AM »
Live from Daryl's House is a fantastic show!
She's got a worm in 'er belly? That's disgusting! That's interesting, but very disgusting. 

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3063 on: December 17, 2020, 11:32:54 AM »
Dec.17, 1949
HBD Paul Rodgers!
https://youtu.be/z2Bw_HH_T4g
"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
“His gaze was stern, unyielding, like an Easter Island head stuck in traffic” - Dylan Moran

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3064 on: December 17, 2020, 04:44:22 PM »
Wright Brothers Day

It was on the morning of December 17, 1903, that Wilbur and Orville Wright became the first men to fly and control a powered heavier-than-air machine. Events on December 17 traditionally include a "flyover" by military aircraft and a special ceremony held at the Wright Brothers National Memorial, a 425-acre area that features a 60-foot granite pylon on top of Kill Devil Hill, where the Wright Brothers' camp was located. The flyover takes place at precisely 10:35 a.m., the time of the original flight in 1903.

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3065 on: December 17, 2020, 08:34:46 PM »
Freedom without regulations that protect the general good is nothing less than anarchy by the rich.

"Riders might be worse than Kardashians for stupidity any more." Cornbe

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3066 on: December 21, 2020, 05:06:23 PM »
Frank Zappa was born on this date in 1940.

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3067 on: December 22, 2020, 08:45:56 AM »
Fourstring and I got engaged whilst listening to Apostrophe!

https://youtu.be/zXP_pr7np-o
She's got a worm in 'er belly? That's disgusting! That's interesting, but very disgusting. 

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3068 on: December 22, 2020, 10:46:09 AM »
Fourstring and I got engaged whilst listening to Apostrophe!

https://youtu.be/zXP_pr7np-o
Solemnized by Father O’Blivion?
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3069 on: December 22, 2020, 11:02:00 AM »
Dec. 22, 1954,

At Edwards Air Force Base in the high desert of southern California, test pilot Captain Richard James Harer was flying a Lockheed F-94C-1-LO Starfire, serial number 50-962. Harer was accompanied by fellow test pilot Captain Milburn G. Apt in a chase plane.
The Lockheed F-94 was the first U.S. production fighter aircraft to be equipped with a drag chute to provide aerodynamic braking on landing. (Drag chutes had been in use on larger aircraft since the 1930s.) There was speculation that the sudden deceleration provided by a drag chute might be useful during air-to-air combat.
Captain Harer’s test flight was to determine what would happen when the drag chute opened while the airplane was traveling at 600 miles per hour.
The plane was equipped with a manual release, so Harer could get rid of the parachute after the test. In the event that the manual release failed, Harer could get rid of the parachute by detonating a small explosive charge which was wired to the rope that secured the parachute to the plane. If both of these devices failed, Harer could still get rid of the parachute by going into a dive and maneuvering the parachute into the blast of flame from his afterburner. In sum, a thoughtful arrangement of affairs. Harer got into his plane and took it up to 20,000 feet, closely followed by a chase aircraft flown by another captain named Milburn Apt. Harer opened the parachute, began to tumble crazily across the sky and then—as far as anyone knows—must have tried the manual release. It failed. Then, because he was a cool, skillful pilot, Harer must have kept his head and tried the explosive charge, although no one is sure what he did. In any case, the charge did not explode. By this time Harer was plummeting out of control toward the dry lake bed at perhaps 500 miles an hour, with Captain Apt flying right beside him shouting advice over the radio. Harer’s plane continued down, wallowing, gyrating, the deadly parachute never quite getting into the flame of the afterburner. Harer crashed. His plane burst into flames.
Captain Apt landed on the lake bed at almost the instant of the crash. The two planes, one burning, one under control, skidded along beside each other. As soon as he came to a halt, Apt leaped out of his plane and ran over to Harer’s. “It was nothing but fire,” Apt remembers. “The only part of the plane I could see sticking out of the flames was the tip of the tail.”

Apt dashed around to the other side of Harer’s plane. Strangely, this side was not burning. Apt was able to climb up onto the plane and look through the Plexiglas canopy into the cockpit. It was filled with smoke, but he could see Harer inside, feebly, faintly moving his head. Apt grabbed the canopy release, a device on the outside of the plane designed for just such and emergency. It failed.
The dry lake bed has absolutely nothing on its surface except the fine-grained sand of which it is composed. No sticks, no stones, nothing that Apt might have picked up to smash the canopy. He tried to pry it off with his bare hands, an effort that, had it not been for the circumstances, would have been ludicrous. He smashed it with his fists and succeeded only in injuring himself. Meanwhile he could see Harer inside, the fire beginning to get to him now.
As Captain Apt smashed his fists on the canopy, a single jeep raced across the lake bed toward the plane at 70 miles an hour. Reaching the plane, the driver leaped out and ran over to it, carrying the only useful piece of equipment he had: a five-pound brass fire extinguisher, the size of a rolling pin. He could as well have tried to put out the fire by spitting on it. Apt and the jeep driver shouted contradictory instructions at each other above the growing roar of the fire. The jeep driver emptied his extinguisher on the forward part of the plane, then handed the empty container to Apt. Apt raised it above his head and smashed it down on the canopy. It bounced off. He pounded the canopy again and again, as hard as he could, and each time the extinguisher bounced off. “It was like hitting a big spring,” he says forlornly. “I couldn’t break it.”

By this time Captain Harer’s flesh was on fire. The jeep driver dashed back to his vehicle and returned with a five-gallon gasoline can. “My God.” Apt thought. “No, no,” the jeep driver cried, “it’s full of water. It’s all right.”

Apt hefted the can, which weighed nearly 50 pounds. He raised it high in the air and smashed it down. The canopy cracked. Apt hit it again, opening a hole in it, letting out the smoke inside. In a few seconds he had broken a large jagged opening through which Harer could be pulled out. “It was a tough job,” Apt says. “Harer was a very tall man.” Was a tall man. Not is, but was.

“He’s not tall now,” Apt says. “Both his feet were burned off.” Captain Harer lived. Today, he gets around very well on his artificial feet. He has been promoted to major and will soon be honorably retired from the Air Force with a pension. He has no memory whatever of the accident. He recalls flying at 20,000 feet and popping open the parachute, and his next memory is of awakening in a hospital two weeks later. . . .

For his heroism in the face of great danger, Captain Mel Apt was awarded the Soldier’s Medal, the highest award for valor in a non-combat mission for Army and Air Force personnel.  The regulation establishing the award states, “The performance must have involved personal hazard or danger and the voluntary risk of life under conditions not involving conflict with an armed enemy. Awards will not be made solely on the basis of having saved a life.”

Mel Apt would continue as a test pilot at Edwards Air Force Base, and on 26 September 1956, he would be the first pilot to exceed Mach 3 when he flew the Bell X-2 rocketplane to Mach 3.196 (2,094 miles per hour/3,377 kilometers per hour) at 65,589 feet (19,992 meters). Just seconds later, the X-2 began uncontrolled oscillations and came apart. Mel Apt was unable to escape from the cockpit and was killed when the X-2 hit the desert floor. He was the thirteenth test pilot to be killed at Edwards since 1950.

Excerpted from “10,000 Men to a Plane,” LIFE Magazine, 18 June 1956.
"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3070 on: December 22, 2020, 11:14:50 AM »
Re Maj  Harer and Capt Apt above;
Slow, respectful, funeral salute.
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3071 on: December 23, 2020, 06:26:04 AM »
Dec. 23, 1940
Jorma Kaukonen was born in Washington, D.C.
https://youtu.be/AOOQ1woZWQY
"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
“His gaze was stern, unyielding, like an Easter Island head stuck in traffic” - Dylan Moran

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3072 on: December 23, 2020, 12:53:07 PM »
US Federal Judge Rules James Joyce's Ulysses Not Obscene (1933)

For more than a decade after its debut, James Joyce's masterpiece, Ulysses, was banned in the US. A literary magazine had attempted to publish it in serial form, but the series was cut short after the publishers ran a rather suggestive passage and were convicted of obscenity. When the implicit ban on the book was finally challenged in 1933, Judge John M. Woolsey praised the work for its literary merits and ruled that it was not obscene. How did a publisher force the issue to court? More... Discuss

I recall once looking up the passages that were complained about--even read in full context instead of just in isolation, one would have to be awfully prudish to think them obscene today.  How times have changed. The passages were so mild that I don't even recall them now.  I had the same reaction to Allen Ginsberg's “Howl.”  Amazing to think about the fuss this provoked within living memory.  As a college history major, I had to constantly remind myself to not be dismissive of a historical person's stated motives when they were so far removed from the present culture.
People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.  --Winnie the Pooh

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3073 on: December 23, 2020, 06:49:16 PM »
Today, RIP
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Another big piece of my puzzle, lost.
 :facepalm: :facepalm:
"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
“His gaze was stern, unyielding, like an Easter Island head stuck in traffic” - Dylan Moran

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3074 on: December 25, 2020, 02:08:12 AM »

General George Washington Crosses the Delaware in a Surprise Attack (1776)

By December 1776, the morale of American colonists fighting in the Revolution had been severely weakened by a string of losses to the better-equipped British. On Christmas Day, Washington crossed the partially-frozen Delaware River with thousands of troops, overnight and during an ice storm, to surprise and overwhelm Hessian mercenaries at Trenton. There were few casualties, and the bold move restored hope of an American victory. What secret phrase signaled the start of the crossing? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3075 on: December 25, 2020, 05:31:37 AM »
Dec. 25, 1960,
Dr Irving Cooper received a Christmas gift that inspired his invention of the first cryosurgery device (to freeze tissue). The gift was a wine-bottle opener which lifted the cork by injecting carbon dioxide gas into the bottle. He observed the gas was very cold when released and he could direct small squirts from it to freeze tiny areas on the palm of his hand and watch them thaw. He also observed the freezing effect was very localized and isolated from the surrounding tissue. From this inspiration, he developed a technique of brain surgery in which he used liquid nitrogen flowing in a thin tube first to deaden, and then freeze, tremor-causing brain cells or tumours. The invention created a new field of surgery with applications for other areas of the body as well.
"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
“His gaze was stern, unyielding, like an Easter Island head stuck in traffic” - Dylan Moran

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3076 on: December 25, 2020, 09:11:36 AM »
Jesus Christ was almost certainly not bo9rn, given that the Roman census was in October. But it's an old pagan festival celebrating the return of the sun. So, Happy Christmas!
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3077 on: December 25, 2020, 09:30:29 AM »
It is Issac Netwon's and Jimmy Buffet's birthday

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3078 on: December 26, 2020, 03:52:21 AM »
The Soviet Union Officially Dissolves (1991)

In December 1991, a series of events spelled the end of the Soviet Union—and each has been put forth as the date the Union truly broke up. On December 8, the presidents of Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus declared the Soviet Union dissolved. Two weeks later, on December 21, representatives of most of the remaining Soviet states signed an agreement confirming the dissolution. On December 25, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev resigned from office. The following day, what final step was taken? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3079 on: December 27, 2020, 03:22:50 PM »
HBD Louis Pasteur (1822)
Perhaps best remembered for developing the pasteurization process, Pasteur was a French microbiologist who made great strides in keeping people safe by revolutionizing contemporary thinking about diseases. He proved that food spoilage was due to exposure to microorganisms, leading to the use of heat pasteurization to kill bacteria. He developed vaccines against anthrax, cholera, and rabies, and his work on silkworm diseases saved the French silk industry. What was "Pasteur's Deception"? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3080 on: December 27, 2020, 08:46:03 PM »
Jesus Christ was almost certainly not bo9rn, given that the Roman census was in October. But it's an old pagan festival celebrating the return of the sun. So, Happy Christmas!

Not to mention that shepherds weren't in the field by night in the winter...
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3081 on: December 28, 2020, 06:27:14 AM »
1869
America’s first Labor Day
The Knights of Labor, a labor union of tailors in Philadelphia, hold the first Labor Day ceremonies in American history. The Knights of Labor was established as a secret society of Pennsylvanian tailors earlier in the year and later grew into a national body that played an ...read more


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3082 on: December 28, 2020, 06:32:08 AM »
1938
Silent-film star and inventor Florence Lawrence dies
On December 28, 1938, the silent-film star Florence Lawrence dies by suicide in Beverly Hills. She was 52 years old. Though she was best known for her roles in nearly 250 films, Lawrence was also an inventor: She designed the first “auto signaling arm,” a mechanical turn signal, ...read more

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3083 on: December 28, 2020, 06:38:43 AM »
1612 First observation of Neptune - Galileo observes and records a "fixed star" without realising it is a planet

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3084 on: December 28, 2020, 06:44:40 AM »
One for the Trekkies.

HBD

1932 Nichelle Nichols, American actress and singer (Uhura in Star Trek), born in Robbins, Illinois

1922 Stan Lee [Stanley Martin Lieber], American comic-book artist, writer and creative leader of Marvel multimedia corporation (Avengers, Spider-Man, Incredible Hulk), born in NYC, New York (d. 2018)
« Last Edit: December 28, 2020, 07:00:20 AM by sodapop6620 »

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3085 on: December 28, 2020, 07:45:36 AM »
Dec. 28, 1999
It took only two hours for winds to destroy two centuries of history. The usually peaceful gardens at Versailles, France became a weather-beaten battlefield during violent storms that killed more than 100 people in western Europe and reduced some cultural treasures to ruins. Many 200 year old trees were uprooted.
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3086 on: December 28, 2020, 11:13:40 AM »
Jesus Christ was almost certainly not bo9rn, given that the Roman census was in October. But it's an old pagan festival celebrating the return of the sun. So, Happy Christmas!

Not to mention that shepherds weren't in the field by night in the winter...
But...   many (most?) people were awake during the winter nights.
The darkness of night is up to 15 hrs in winter.  People don't sleep that long.  They did what is called 'segmented sleep'.   People went to bed after it got dark and naturally woke up after a few hours of sleep.  They were awake two to four hours.  They read, prayed, made love and even visited with neighbors.  Then they would go back to sleep and wake up by the sun.   It was called (by some?) first sleep and second sleep.
https://www.npr.org/2014/11/23/366166209/countering-the-8-hour-sleep-schedule
Life is made up of moments, small pieces of glittering mica in a long stretch of gray cement. We have to teach ourselves how to make room for them, to love them, and to live, really live. - Anna Quindlen

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3087 on: December 29, 2020, 06:16:19 PM »
Dec. 29, 1790,
 An obituary was published for Thomas Fuller in Boston's Columbian Centinel. “Died—Negro Tom, the famous African calculator, aged 80 years.” He was enslaved from Africa at age 14. Fuller was a prodigy in arithmetical calculation, though he could neither read nor write. Once asked how many seconds a man lived in 70 years, some odd months, weeks and days, he speedily gave an answer that his questioner said was too high, but Fuller was correct as he had included the leap years in his calculation. If, in the course of a calculation, his progress was interrupted by conversation on another subject, he could continue by picking up where he had left off. Dr. Benjamin Rush, an anti-slavery campaigner, used Fuller's ability as an example of the equivalent intellect of both black and white men.
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3088 on: January 01, 2021, 05:31:58 PM »
Times Square Ball Drops for the First Time (1908)

In 1904, The New York Times moved its headquarters to what is now known as Times Square. That December, it held a New Year's Eve celebration that proved to be quite popular. A few years later, the newspaper created an illuminated time ball—then a well-known dockside device by which sailors set their ships' clocks—that would fall at midnight. The annual ball-drop outlived both the newspaper's address on the square and the use of time balls in general. What was Times Square's original name? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3089 on: January 04, 2021, 07:01:44 AM »
Welcome to the USA Utah.

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3090 on: January 06, 2021, 03:57:49 AM »
Happy Birthday Heinrich Schliemann (1822)
As a boy, Schliemann loved Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. After making his fortune, he devoted himself at the age of 36 to searching for the ruins of the ancient city of Troy, which played a prominent role in Homer's account of the Trojan War but was believed to be fictional. In 1873, Schliemann not only found the remains of Troy—verifying the Trojan War's place in history—but also uncovered the ruins of several other cities that had been built on the same site. Where did he find Troy? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3091 on: January 06, 2021, 04:10:49 AM »
modern day Turkey?
Putting the laughter back into manslaughter

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3093 on: January 06, 2021, 10:40:53 AM »
Jan. 6, 1935
Singer Doris Troy was born.
She was a session singer with Dionne Warwick, sang on Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon and released an album on The Beatles Apple label. She had a 1964 UK No.37 single with 'Whatcha Gonna Do About It' and the 1963 US No. 10 hit 'Just One Look'. She sang back-up for many acts including The Rolling Stones, (‘You Can't Always Get What You Want’), Carly Simon's ('You're So Vain') and George Harrison, (‘My Sweet Lord’). Troy died on 16 February 2004.
https://youtu.be/I8OQVUS6YuY
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3094 on: January 07, 2021, 04:12:35 AM »
Happy Birthday Millard Fillmore (1800)

Born in a log cabin in rural New York, Fillmore was compelled to work at an early age to help support his large, impoverished family. Despite his limited education, he became a lawyer and was elected vice president under Zachary Taylor. Upon Taylor's death in 1850, Fillmore was sworn in as president. His attempt to take a moderate stance on the highly contentious issue of slavery ended his political career. While being fed soup, a dying Fillmore made what remark that turned out to be his last? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3095 on: January 07, 2021, 08:47:20 AM »
IIRC, Millard Fillmore was a single term president.  The most noteworthy factoid about his record that I can recall is he is the only president who failed to win the nomination of his own party for reelection. 

Counterpoint Millard Fillmore: Still dead, still misquoted, 139 years later
The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt.    Bertrand Russell

"The fishermen know that the sea is dangerous and the storm terrible, but they have never found these dangers sufficient reason for remaining ashore."   Vincent van Gogh

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3096 on: January 10, 2021, 06:16:56 AM »
Jan. 10, 1935
Happy Birthday Ronnie Hawkins OC.
Canadian rock and roll musician whose career has spanned more than half a century. His career began in Arkansas, where he was born and raised. He found success in Ontario, Canada, and has lived there for most of his life. He is considered highly influential in the establishment and evolution of rock music in Canada.
Also known as "Rompin' Ronnie", "Mr. Dynamo", or simply "The Hawk", he was one of the key players in the 1960s rock scene in Toronto. Throughout his career, Hawkins has performed all across North America and recorded more than twenty-five albums. His hit songs included covers of Chuck Berry's "Thirty Days" (entitled "Forty Days" by Hawkins) and Young Jessie's "Mary Lou", a song about a "gold-digging woman". Other well-known recordings are "Who Do You Love?", "Hey Bo Diddley", and "Susie Q", which was written by his cousin, rockabilly artist Dale Hawkins.
Hawkins is also notable for his role as a talent scout and mentor of musicians he recruited for his band the Hawks. Roy Buchanan was an early Hawks guitarist on the song "Who Do You Love". The most successful example of this were the musicians who left him to form The Band. Other musicians Hawkins had recruited went on to form Robbie Lane and the Disciples, Janis Joplin's Full Tilt Boogie Band, Crowbar, Bearfoot, and Skylark.

"When we were kids, we used to slip around here and there and get into those watermelon patches to get one to eat. Well, Mr. Winters - he's the farmer who owned all those watermelon patches and had a '37 Ford pickup that I wanted - one day that old farmer caught us and said, 'Now look, boys, I know you been taking those melons, so I'm going to give you a warning now. I poisoned one of those watermelons out there in that field and I'm the only one who knows where it is. If you want to take a chance and eat the fucker, and kill yourself, well you just go on ahead.

"Damn. And he knew where it was, too! Well, I had to do something. Just had to. The next morning I came to that old farmer. "Let me tell you something, Mr. Winters," I said. "Now there are two poisoned watermelons out there in that patch and I'm the only one who knows where the other one is. So do you want to negotiate?'

"Damn, but we were young and wild and rockin' in those days."
On the left, wearing the Order of Canada:
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3097 on: January 13, 2021, 06:28:16 AM »
Dec. 13, 1942,
 The first use of an ejection seat to save a pilot was made. Helmut Schenk, a German test pilot, required its use when his Heinkel He 280 refused to separate from the tow aircraft due to the cable release mechanism icing up. As a precaution, Schenk ejected and landed safely. The tow was being made because the He-280 was powered by two Argus pulse-jets that required a high forward speed to start up. The first ejection seat was made by Heinkel, for the He 280. It was powered by compressed air, and accelerated the pilot upwards at between seven-g and nine-g. The He-280 was the first twin-jet engined aircraft and the first jet aircraft to go beyond prototype stage.
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"We have constructed pyramids, in honour of our escaping." - Jim Morrison”
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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3098 on: January 14, 2021, 01:11:10 PM »
Huygens Probe Lands on Titan (2005)

It took the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft more than six years to reach Saturn. During the trip, the Huygens probe remained dormant, preserving its battery life for a landing on Saturn's largest moon. The only moon in the solar system known to have clouds and a dense atmosphere, Titan resembles Earth in many ways. It was not known whether the probe would land on solid ground or in an ocean. After Huygens touched down, Titan's surface was described as being similar to what food? More... Discuss

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Re: Today in History
« Reply #3099 on: January 16, 2021, 05:23:27 AM »
Nothing to celebrate here.

Prohibition Era Begins in the US (1920)
By January of 1919, members of the US temperance movement had been campaigning against excessive drinking for a century. Their efforts resulted in the 18th Amendment, which, when it went into effect in 1920, prohibited the sale—but not the consumption—of liquor. Prohibition spawned what John D. Rockefeller called "a vast army of lawbreakers" who profited from the illegal sale of alcohol, and the failed ban was repealed in 1933. What was delivered to the White House immediately after the repeal? More... Discuss