Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Author Topic: Medium-term review of the 1000R  (Read 7977 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Medium-term review of the 1000R
« on: June 26, 2014, 11:13:16 PM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login

(Me at Rainey Curve at Laguna Seca)

Well, I've had the S1000R few a couple of months now and I've gotten over two thousand miles on it (including a track day) so now I think I can evaluate the bike properly.

I'm not going to talk about the aesthetics, because beauty, as they say, is in the eye of the beholder.  Either you like it or you don't.

First off, a little about myself and the bikes I'll be comparing it to.  I'm 6' 2" or so, with longer limbs and a shorter torso compared to most.  I prefer a bit of forward lean, and in fact find bolt-upright bikes such as the GS or V-Strom uncomfortable and awkward.
The bikes I've owned or ridden extensively that I'll be comparing the S1000R to are a 2004 Triumph Speed Triple (last of the 955s), A 2006 BMW K1200R, A 2008 BMB R1200GS, a 2012 BMW F800R, a 2009 Suzuki GSXR 1000, a 2014 KTM Superduke 1290, a 2012 V4R Tuono, and most importantly, a 2010 BMW S1000RR. 

The S1000R I bought is the "Sport" model in Europe or the "Premium" model here in the US.  It has four power map/traction control modes, plus six electronic suspension modes.  It comes with a quick shifter, slipper clutch, heated grips, and cruise control.

« Last Edit: June 26, 2014, 11:32:16 PM by miles »
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2014, 11:13:39 PM »
Basic ergonomics:  I was considering the KTM Superduke 1290 and this bike (I had deposits down on both of them.  I was first on both dealerships' lists), but the info on cycle-ergo.com had me a bit concerned about the KTM, and thinking more positively about the BMW.  My old K1200R fit me so well it was as if they'd used my body to design the ergs of the bike, and according to Cycle-ergo.com the new S1000R fit almost exactly the same.  The KTM, though, had a far more upright position, which worried me.
When I actually did test ride the KTM, it turns out I was right to be concerned.  The bike has an adjustable bar clamp (which is cool) but even with it all the way forward and perhaps swapping out for a straighter bar I'd still be too upright.  The S1000R, though, fit me like a glove.  I can find no fault with the ergs of the bike, but I'm sure the pegs will be too high for many.  In fact, I suspect that more people would find the Superduke comfy than the S1000R, with its lower pegs and more upright bars- but not me.
The saddle is fine, but I'm not particularly particular about those things.  I've raced bicycles for most of my life, and compared to those saddles any motorcycle seat is a barcalounger.

Controls:  The heated grips are BMW style, with high/low/off settings.  Because the bars are completely exposed in the breeze, the grips aren't as effective as they might be on other bikes, even though they do get plenty hot.  Some on the S1000R board have fit GS-style handguards, which would help keep the mitts warm.  I might do that at some point in the future for cold-weather riding, but hey- I live in Southern California and only get the occasional snowy, icy ride.
The bike has non-BMW traditional turn signals.  In fact, all current BMWs have the Japanese-standard style signal switches now.  The left switch assembly also has the button to turn the ABS and TC off, and another button to change the preload settings for the DDC (Dynamic Damping Control, or electronic suspension) in addition to the typical high beam switch, turn signals, and trip/info switches.  It sounds really busy, but it isn't too bad.  On the top of the switch housing is where the magic happens- the cruise control.  It functions exactly like a car CC, with an on switch and a separate set/resume switch.  It's dead simple to use, and works flawlessly.  The CC has some interesting quirks which I'll detail later.
On the right side you have the heated grip switch, the TC/power map switch and the kill switch/starter button.  The mode switch is difficult to hit with your thumb while maintaining throttle, so I generally reach across with my left hand.  Otherwise it's all easy-peasy.

The shifter is equipped with a quick-shift, which completely rocks.  Once you get used to the things you never want a bike without.  Same for the slipper clutch.  Seriously, I'm not going to buy another bike without them.

The brakes are absolutely freaking awesome.  Hand of God type awesome.  One finger and your eyeballs launch out of your head awesome.  Seriously, they are unbelievable.  I'm used to them now, having had the same brakes on my S1000RR, but whenever I jump on another bike I wonder why it is so much work to slow down.  The ABS is generally unnoticeable, and its thresholds are set by the TC mode you choose.  In "Rain" mode the ABS kicks in a lot earlier, and in "Dynamic Pro" mode the rear has no ABS at all and the front only kicks in very little and very late in the game.  The brakes are sometimes linked.  In "Rain" or "Road" mode the front lever activates the rear as well (to a degree).  In "Dynamic" or "Dynamic Pro" modes the brakes are independent.  At no point does the rear lever activate the front brakes.

The gearbox is smooth and the shifts are clean and sure.  Maybe not quite Honda perfect, but at least as good as, say, a GSXR gearbox.  The engine vibes exist, and are more exaggerated than in a Honda or Kawasaki, but again, no rougher than a GSXR.  I had a set of Manic Salamander throttle locks from the S1000RR, and I swapped them onto the new bike even though it has cruise control.  The heavy weight of the things helps quell the vibes a bit I'm sure.

Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2014, 11:19:37 PM »
The engine:  Some of you may know about my history with my old S1000RR, and may remember my comments when the 150hp was announced for the S1000R model.  The quick rundown is that my old bike had a motor built for AMA Superbike racing, and it put out 208 HP at the rear wheel on pump gas.  It blew up, though, and I swapped in a stock motor which dynoed at 185 RWHP.  My first reaction on hearing that the "Single R" would be so neutered was disgust.  How could anybody live with only 150HP? I wondered, and why would BMW do such a shitty thing?
It turns out that for road use, the surprisingly extensive motor changes have been a good thing.  The reason the power is gone is simple- they chopped the top end off.  The "Double R" revs to 14,200 RPM, but the Single R only spins to 12k.  That said, the Single R has more power everywhere in the rev range that it does have compared to the Double R.  Few of us wind bikes out above 12k anyway, so most of us would never notice the loss.  That said, I certainly did at Laguna Seca the other day.  Not just the lack of power, but the lower red line meant a whole lot more shifting, or sitting at the limiter or a quick up shift then an immediate downshift, where the Double R would run into any of those issues.

For road use, though, it is a better motor.  It pulls from 2k on up with no surging and no complaints.  The fueling is perfect and the throttle response is unbelievably linear. 

The motor has enough gruffness to silence the whole "Inline fours have no character" crowd, but no so much to make it buzzy or irritating.  The sound is distinctive.  At the track day on monday I could tell without looking which bikes were BMWs (there were plenty of S1000RRs there, but only my single Single R) by the sound.  Laguna Seca has severe noise restrictions so every BMW but one had stock pipes, and that one guy got pulled for the dy for being too loud.
I kept my super bike race pipe from my Double R, and I'm going to install it on the new bike sometime soon, but it isn't subtle.  Nobody would call it quiet.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2014, 11:33:54 PM by miles »
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2014, 11:26:33 PM »
So- enough of all that.  How does it work on the road, you ask?

Really damned well, I have to say.  The bike is exceedingly sure-footed.  The DDC works very well at keeping the bike from ever getting out of shape.  It never feels as if you're in over your head.  It's always stable, and ready to do whatever you want.
In contrast, my old Double R was a pussycat and a perfectly calm, easy to ride bike until you switched into "Race" or "Slick" mode and got the RPMs up.  If you did that it turned into a raging beast that was barely on the edge of control and a serious threat to one's sanity.  The Single R never gets that way.  "Dynamic Pro" mode doesn't have the extremely angry throttle response that "Slick" mode on the Double R has, and the motor of the Single R doesn't spin up anywhere near as quickly, either.  As a result it's a lot harder to ge the bike to go completely mental- which, for most of us, is a Very Good Thing.

Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2014, 11:41:22 PM »
How does it work on the track?

Not as well as the Double R, to be blunt.  At a very tight, technical track it might hold its own, but a fast track, not so much.  It has excellent drive out of corners, but runs out of steam and need frequent shifts.  The gearing is also road-oriented and not right for faster, flowing tracks, either.

Still, it's perfectly capable of running in the fast group on street tires and with stock suspension, so you really can't say much bad about that.  There were times when the rearward weight bias (as compared to the Double R) bothered me, but then again, for hard braking it's a benefit, so...

The crummy aerodynamics are a hindrance at higher speeds, but that's just the reality of a naked bike.  If I wanted to tuck in, I'd have kept the Double R (which, by the way, is being rebuilt into a Bonneville bike).

Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2014, 11:49:05 PM »
Things I really like about the bike:

It fits me very well.  I find it perfectly comfortable for long periods, and thanks to the better view and wider, higher bars the position is fantastic for control on narrow, loose, sketchy back roads in a way the Double R was never going to be.

Cruise control.  It really rocks on long, boring stretches.  It's nice to be able to take your right hand off the bars every so often, and to be able to maintain a constant speed without thinking about it.

The motor.  It's as good a road motor as anything I've ever ridden, and better than most.

The brakes.  They really are all that.

The electronics.  People complain about "electronic nannies" but the reality is that you don't even notice them, and in the meanwhile they let you get on with riding better than you could without them.

The DDC suspension.  It's wonderful to be able to adjust for the conditions as the conditions change.  Soft and supple on a bumpy rippled road, firm and hard for a fast rip through smooth twists... all just a button away.

Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2014, 11:56:50 PM »
Things I don't like:

The low beam shuts off two seconds after the high beam turns on.  For the life of me I can't figure out why BMW did that.  The Double R's lights don't do it, and the two bikes have the same alternator, so it's not a power management scheme...  I have no idea why anyone would want less than all the light possible when they flip on the high beams.   :shrug:

Also, the low beam housing protrudes a bit from the mini fairing and I can see the top edge of it all lit up at night.  I don't need a light source screwing with my night vision, and that's exactly what it does.  I've hit it with some electrical tape for now, but I plan on painting that exposed top edge sometime soon.

Another similar bother is that the bar clamp and bar are a bright silver anodize over a sand-blast texture, so they reflect a lot of sunlight onto the dash, making some of the gauges hard to read at times.  I'm not sure what I'm going to do about that.

Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #7 on: June 27, 2014, 12:00:40 AM »
Odd quirks:

The high beam/low beam shutoff thing, for one.  WTF were they thinking?

The cruise control shuts off when you get airborne.

The TC will stay in whatever mode you left it in when you shut the bike off, unless it was "Dynamic Pro".  If that's what you'd been in when you turned the bike off, when you start up again it defaults to "Dynamic".

Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online viffergyrl

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: 1 hour north of La-La Land
  • Posts: 3179
  • Hey! Wait for me.....
  • Motorcycles: 2007 Suzuki SV650
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #8 on: June 27, 2014, 12:05:04 AM »
The cruise control shuts off when you get airborne.


Because you reached cruising altitude? So I'm reading this all to M.Brane and we are speculating (knowing you) on just how you found this out.
The world is a mess. It has always been a mess. Our job is to straighten out our own lives.  Joseph Campbell

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2014, 12:12:15 AM »
Mods I've done to my bike (and plan on doing):

I wired in a PDM-60 'fuse block' (with BMW-K's help).  I'm using it to run all my add-ons, even though the bike has three auxiliary connectors on the wiring harness.  This is mainly to isolate anything I do from the bike's core systems.

I bummed some cheap LED driving lights from BMW-K as well, and some ghetto mounts he fabbed.  Our group of SoCal locals tend to ride at night, rapidly, and under adverse conditions.  I'd like to be able to see when doing so.

I also wired in a Powerlet plug for my heated vest.

I installed a USB socket to charge my phone (which lives in a RAM mount on the bars) while riding.  I use the phone as my all-in-one GPS, music source, info center and sometimes telephone paired with my SENA headset.

I installed a little charging system indicator LED, since I wasn't totally certain the charging system would be able to run headlights, driving lights, grips and vest at the same time.  SO far, so good.  Not an issue.

I swapped some hot-rod halogen bulbs in the headlights.  65 watts, high and low beam.  Down the road I'll probably go with HIDs, but I may test out some LED lights first.

I installed radiator and oil cooler guards, because a lot of my riding is on roads of questionable cleanliness and that are very remote. The last thing I need is a punctured radiator or oil cooler.

I have a race pipe and PC-V to install.  I was waiting until after my Laguna Seca track day to do this.

I also have some sexy lightweight wheels to put on, which I'll probably do at my next tire change.

I'm probably going to give up on using my phone as my GPS, and if I do I'm going with a Garmin Montana, which I'll hardwire in.

When the chain wears out I'll do a 520 conversion.
« Last Edit: June 27, 2014, 12:59:39 AM by miles »
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2014, 12:12:43 AM »
The cruise control shuts off when you get airborne.


Because you reached cruising altitude? So I'm reading this all to M.Brane and we are speculating (knowing you) on just how you found this out.


Did you guess Highway 58?
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2014, 12:14:31 AM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online viffergyrl

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: 1 hour north of La-La Land
  • Posts: 3179
  • Hey! Wait for me.....
  • Motorcycles: 2007 Suzuki SV650
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2014, 12:17:46 AM »
The cruise control shuts off when you get airborne.


Because you reached cruising altitude? So I'm reading this all to M.Brane and we are speculating (knowing you) on just how you found this out.


Did you guess Highway 58?
That was our first thought.
The world is a mess. It has always been a mess. Our job is to straighten out our own lives.  Joseph Campbell

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #13 on: June 27, 2014, 12:22:00 AM »
Things I really would like to do in the long term:

I would love to fab up a set of mounts so I could run the BMW Sport hard bags:
visitors can't see pics , please register or login

I had a set on my K1200R and I loved them. 

Rebuild the stock fork and shock with upgraded parts.  The DDC rocks to no end, but ultimately they are still OEM-level suspension components.  There's a suspension shop in Australia that's got it all figured out, and now they are trying to calculate prices.

Ride the wheels off the bike.  I'm committed to this thing long-term, and I plan on racking up plenty of miles on it.
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #14 on: June 27, 2014, 12:23:10 AM »

Did you guess Highway 58?
That was our first thought.

I confirmed it on some raised cattle guards on Cholame, too. 
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online viffergyrl

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: 1 hour north of La-La Land
  • Posts: 3179
  • Hey! Wait for me.....
  • Motorcycles: 2007 Suzuki SV650
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2014, 12:27:10 AM »
Ah. I did not recognize the road in the picture which I assume is Cholame. Haven't been on that one but I figured it was one of those less traveled in the Central Valley.

Nice write up.
The world is a mess. It has always been a mess. Our job is to straighten out our own lives.  Joseph Campbell

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2014, 12:29:56 AM »
A tidbit that may only be interesting to a few of us:  The Laguna Seca track day RGBeard and I did was a few days past the six month anniversary of Kevin Stevens' passing.  He had badgered me for years to do a track day there with him, but for a variety of reasons it never happened.  Now, though, I had a bike with a legal muffler, so when Rusty suggested it as a memorial track day I readily agreed.

If you look closely at the photo at the top of this thread you may see an orange aluminum canister taped (using Angry Birds duct tape) to my brake line right by the lever.  It contains a bit of Kevin's ashes.  He must have been OK with the whole thing, because I didn't hear a peep from him all day.

The beverage of choice trackside was Diet Coke, also in his honor.  Normally I would never touch the stuff, but Kevin was a great consumer of the toxic liquid, so we drank several bottles each in his memory.
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2014, 12:30:54 AM »
Ah. I did not recognize the road in the picture which I assume is Cholame. Haven't been on that one but I figured it was one of those less traveled in the Central Valley.

Nice write up.


No, that's not Cholame.  That's Coalinga-Los Gatos Rd.  One of my favorites in the area.
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online viffergyrl

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: 1 hour north of La-La Land
  • Posts: 3179
  • Hey! Wait for me.....
  • Motorcycles: 2007 Suzuki SV650
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2014, 06:37:07 AM »
:thumbsup: I will make a note of that one as well.

Speaking of Kevin: When Team Roto-Plooker partcipated in the Chump Car World Series 'Interstate 5 Middle of Nowhere Gran Prix' at Buttonwillow Raceway in May there was a fundraiser for ALS. We made a donation in memory of KeS.

We finished 7th (out of 30-somethng cars) in this 24 hour race.

Edit: 'Achilles absent... is Achilles still' I think of Kevin often; he has a way of taking up skull space. It's a good thing.

Thanks again.
The world is a mess. It has always been a mess. Our job is to straighten out our own lives.  Joseph Campbell

Offline kneescrubber

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: Neither here nor there
  • Posts: 10479
  • Nothing beats good line of sight
  • Motorcycles: 1999 VFR
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2014, 09:50:59 AM »
....If I wanted to tuck in, I'd have kept the Double R (which, by the way, is being rebuilt into a Bonneville bike).

Always keep it interesting Miles.  ;)
Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Offline BMW-K

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: SoCAL! Represent!
  • Posts: 1117
  • The Original ER6i Pimp
  • Motorcycles: F800GS, 765 RS, WR250R
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2014, 11:18:43 PM »
I just got to spend a few hundred miles on Miles S1kr.  So I thought that since I'm now fully vetted on the bike I should spend some time to write a review.








It's a good bike!  Much fun was had!  Buy one! 







The End.   8)
IBA #:  20880
Damn.  Was that really a good idea?

Offline kneescrubber

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: Neither here nor there
  • Posts: 10479
  • Nothing beats good line of sight
  • Motorcycles: 1999 VFR
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #21 on: July 07, 2014, 07:18:33 AM »
Sweet!
Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Offline BMW-K

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: SoCAL! Represent!
  • Posts: 1117
  • The Original ER6i Pimp
  • Motorcycles: F800GS, 765 RS, WR250R
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #22 on: July 07, 2014, 09:19:55 AM »
Sweet!

I put a lot of work into that report.  I'm glad you liked it! ;D
IBA #:  20880
Damn.  Was that really a good idea?

Offline Rincewind

  • Member
  • Location: SEPA
  • Posts: 336
  • Motorcycles: DL650A
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #23 on: July 25, 2014, 06:12:33 PM »
Great review, Miles.  Thanks for taking the time to write it.

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #24 on: August 11, 2014, 12:36:07 AM »
....If I wanted to tuck in, I'd have kept the Double R (which, by the way, is being rebuilt into a Bonneville bike).

Always keep it interesting Miles.  ;)



Here's a pic of my old bike in its new incarnation:
visitors can't see pics , please register or login
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online squeezer

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: OC, CA
  • Posts: 2537
  • squirrelly geezer
  • Motorcycles: 16 Tiger Xr(x)
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #25 on: August 11, 2014, 12:53:59 AM »
Now that's all kinds of cool.
A man with no sig

Online coho

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: Pacific NorthWet
  • Posts: 4938
  • Probably not wearing pants.
  • Motorcycles: R1100RT (Gentleman's Express) - StFU200 (The Dumbbike) - Guzzi V7II (Tiny Musclecar)
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #26 on: August 11, 2014, 12:58:33 AM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login



Coooool.  :drif:
If it weren't for the therapeutic properties of the occasional off-camber decreasing radius downhill right-hander I'd almost certainly go completely sane.

"I like the beverages."  -CLAY

Offline kneescrubber

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: Neither here nor there
  • Posts: 10479
  • Nothing beats good line of sight
  • Motorcycles: 1999 VFR
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #27 on: August 11, 2014, 06:37:17 AM »
....If I wanted to tuck in, I'd have kept the Double R (which, by the way, is being rebuilt into a Bonneville bike).

Always keep it interesting Miles.  ;)



Here's a pic of my old bike in its new incarnation:
visitors can't see pics , please register or login


 :hail:

Do you have a head on shot?

Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #28 on: August 11, 2014, 09:19:04 AM »
visitors can't see pics , please register or login


visitors can't see pics , please register or login
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #29 on: August 11, 2014, 09:20:10 AM »
Here's a shot of the Bonneville Salt Flats this weekend:

visitors can't see pics , please register or login
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Offline kneescrubber

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: Neither here nor there
  • Posts: 10479
  • Nothing beats good line of sight
  • Motorcycles: 1999 VFR
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #30 on: August 11, 2014, 09:58:38 AM »
Here's a shot of the Bonneville Salt Flats this weekend:

visitors can't see pics , please register or login


Pontoons?
Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Online viffergyrl

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location: 1 hour north of La-La Land
  • Posts: 3179
  • Hey! Wait for me.....
  • Motorcycles: 2007 Suzuki SV650
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #31 on: August 11, 2014, 11:06:29 AM »
Skies and a powerboat tow.
The world is a mess. It has always been a mess. Our job is to straighten out our own lives.  Joseph Campbell

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #32 on: August 11, 2014, 02:36:11 PM »
It was only four inches deep.  You'd have a hard time finding a powerboat with that shallow of a draft.

No, the answer would be a heavy motorcycle with ice-racing studded tires and a tow rope for skiers.
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Offline GRN

  • Member
  • Location: Charlotte, NC
  • Posts: 154
  • Next?
    • Motorcycles Of Charlotte
  • Motorcycles: '14 RT, '10 KLX250S, and whatever I take home from work :)
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #33 on: August 24, 2014, 10:15:48 PM »
Miles - thanks for the time given to the review  :)

Your observations closely echo those of the customers we've had trade RR's for R's. The DDC has been the main reason many have traded up from RR's to HP4's too.

High/low beam switch - there is a trick if you haven't figured it out yet. The problem most have with it is getting from high to low without triggering the flash yielding a high/low/high/low result (even without gloves on). To avoid this simply give a quick, firm squeeze bringing the switch immediately and fully back to the flash position (yields no low only result) and then release to let the switch default to the low position sans any unwanted flashing result.
Sales & Marketing Manager, BMW Motorcycles of Charlotte

There are motorcycle owners, and there are motorcycle riders.
And then there are those of us for whom motorcycling is an essential part of our journey - a way of life, and looking at it…

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #34 on: August 24, 2014, 10:25:49 PM »
High/low beam switch - there is a trick if you haven't figured it out yet. The problem most have with it is getting from high to low without triggering the flash yielding a high/low/high/low result (even without gloves on). To avoid this simply give a quick, firm squeeze bringing the switch immediately and fully back to the flash position (yields no low only result) and then release to let the switch default to the low position sans any unwanted flashing result.

My problem isn't flashing other road users- it's not having all the light I possibly can when riding empty roads at night.
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Offline GRN

  • Member
  • Location: Charlotte, NC
  • Posts: 154
  • Next?
    • Motorcycles Of Charlotte
  • Motorcycles: '14 RT, '10 KLX250S, and whatever I take home from work :)
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #35 on: August 25, 2014, 12:01:12 AM »
High/low beam switch - there is a trick if you haven't figured it out yet. The problem most have with it is getting from high to low without triggering the flash yielding a high/low/high/low result (even without gloves on). To avoid this simply give a quick, firm squeeze bringing the switch immediately and fully back to the flash position (yields no low only result) and then release to let the switch default to the low position sans any unwanted flashing result.

My problem isn't flashing other road users- it's not having all the light I possibly can when riding empty roads at night.

Sorry, read those as two separate things...

IIRC, it's the same switch used on several other models that close both circuits when switched to high (R's, K's & S-RR), you should be able to reroute the low beam circuit to get the desired effect.
Sales & Marketing Manager, BMW Motorcycles of Charlotte

There are motorcycle owners, and there are motorcycle riders.
And then there are those of us for whom motorcycling is an essential part of our journey - a way of life, and looking at it…

Online miles

  • Contributor
  • Member
  • Location:
  • Posts: 3037
  • Motorcycles: Two of them
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #36 on: August 25, 2014, 12:40:34 AM »
With no CanBus errors?
Your mother was a hamster and your father smelled of elderberries

Offline GRN

  • Member
  • Location: Charlotte, NC
  • Posts: 154
  • Next?
    • Motorcycles Of Charlotte
  • Motorcycles: '14 RT, '10 KLX250S, and whatever I take home from work :)
Re: Medium-term review of the 1000R
« Reply #37 on: August 25, 2014, 08:47:28 AM »
With no CanBus errors?

Same switch, so with schematics from one of the models that closes both on high you should be able to modify to match. Give your service manager a call tomorrow and see what they say, it's probably something they can do pretty efficiently. If you don't like their answer, I'll see what my guys say... seems simple enough, but there could be a variable I'm not accounting for.
Sales & Marketing Manager, BMW Motorcycles of Charlotte

There are motorcycle owners, and there are motorcycle riders.
And then there are those of us for whom motorcycling is an essential part of our journey - a way of life, and looking at it…