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Author Topic: Flip-face helmets  (Read 6965 times)

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Online BMW-K

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Flip-face helmets
« on: April 22, 2014, 06:31:51 PM »
Like 'em?  Don't like 'em?  Why?

I'm thinking of adding one and I'm wondering about the general consensus on them.
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Offline Stripes

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2014, 06:39:59 PM »
I love mine! I used to be on the fence about them when I only wore full face helmets. Now that I have a modular, I'll probably never go back to a full face. I think that they are much more convenient. You don't have to take them off at gas stops or when you're having a conversation w/ someone. It also makes taking a drink much faster too, camelback or bottle/can. I also like the way the communication/bluetooth systems work in them too. I was worried about the extra weight on long trips, but w/ my Schuberth C3(IMO the lightest of the mods) I haven't noticed any issues.
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Offline M.Brane

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2014, 07:03:26 PM »
 Love my Neotec. I'd buy another. The only downside I've found so far is the pinlock is very easy to scratch, and if you get any polish on the coated side you'll never get it clear. They're also expensive to replace. Lately I've just been leaving mine on. It creates some halos at night, but I don't ride much at night anyway.

Offline Dan K

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2014, 07:10:07 PM »
Great for glasses and talking to other riders/people at quick stops. I use mine as my daily commuter - mostly because I wear glasses.
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Online smoker

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2014, 07:21:52 PM »
I tried one, an HJC symax? I think? I still have it actually. I'm a general fan of HJC but this one I didn't like. Heavy, noisy, and felt very cheaply made. I only half trust that the chin bar won't un-latch and expose my face in a crash, probably just in my head, but I feel safer with a FF. I did like being able to flip it up at a stop light on hot days, but that was the only thing I liked.
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Offline sleazy rider

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2014, 07:28:21 PM »
Been using them for several years.  Multitec, EXO900, Revolver, Zeus, etc.  I like them because I wear glasses and don't have to fight with padding getting them on.
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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2014, 08:22:48 PM »
Wow, it's great to read that other flip users like them for the same reason.

*  lid on and off with my glasses on a big plus!!!

*  i love the built in sun visor (understand that newer full face non-flips are coming with this feature)

*  flipping it up on a hot day while in traffic

*  taking a quick drink w/o removing lid = win

*  +1 on the pinlock.  It does scratch way too easy.  But, the system works like magic when you need it.
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Online squeezer

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2014, 08:38:00 PM »
I don't think I've bought a non-flip helmet in about a decade. They're so convenient in so many ways that I stopped looking at other helmets after I got my first one. The Shoei Multitec has been my favorite. I think I'll snag a Neotec in a year or so when it's time to replace it.

I think the biggest practical knock is that they're noisier. I wear ear plugs anyway.

I suppose the biggest safety knock is that they might spring open on impact. I've heard reports about that on the interweb, so it must be true. I still don't know anyone who has experienced it, though. Anyone on here ever met someone who had that happen?
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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2014, 09:06:14 PM »
Pretty much everything everyone above me said. Modular helmets rock, especially for glasses wearers and people (like me) who wear a helmet every day.

Luckily, I have a Nolan-shaped head so my choice is easy.
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Offline DNA

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2014, 10:48:05 PM »
Like everyone said heavy and loud but comfy and convenient.

With the front up you get great chipmunk cheeks so cameras are to be avoided.

I have had a few Nolan's and would get another or the shoi when the time is right assuming I ever ride again...




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Offline mastros2

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2014, 03:06:26 AM »
Great for glasses and talking to other riders/people at quick stops.

Yes but...

I tried one, an HJC symax? I think? I still have it actually. I'm a general fan of HJC but this one I didn't like. Heavy, noisy, and felt very cheaply made. I only half trust that the chin bar won't un-latch and expose my face in a crash, probably just in my head, but I feel safer with a FF. I did like being able to flip it up at a stop light on hot days, but that was the only thing I liked.

Exactly my thoughts. I have a Symax but wore it under 5 times. 

A friend was taken out but a cager crossing the yellow. He glanced off the driver door's "A" pillar but luckily he was wearing a full face.   Still had a concussion and bloody mouth from the impact.  In my opinion, a flip up would have blown off with that type of impact.

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2014, 05:43:28 AM »
I have the Shark Evoline 2 and the jury is still out.  I haven't done enough riding to really spend any quality time with it.  It's different that a flip up in that it's a true convertible helmet.  The chinbar actually swings back and sits on the back of the helmet.
So basically, you can ride at speed w/ a 3/4 helmet configuration without having your head torn off.  It's heavy but when riding around town it is nice to just flip it over and be in 3/4 mode.  Back on the highway, just reach back and flip it down and lock it.
The locking takes more than a standard flip helmet to latch as there is a down movement then a back movement to fully lock it.  I need to spend more time with it to give a fully informed review.  And since I'm a bit of a helmet whore, I have many choices.  We'll see.

http://www.webbikeworld.com/r2/motorcycle-helmet/shark-evoline-series-2/

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Offline motormike

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2014, 08:45:18 AM »
I haven't tried them.  I wear glasses.  I'm fine with my full-face helmet.

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #13 on: April 23, 2014, 09:09:20 AM »
I haven't tried them.  I wear glasses.  I'm fine with my full-face helmet.

I'm in agreement with the skating lion dude. I like my full face. I'm not in so much if a hurry that I can't take my helmet off when I stop for a couple of minutes. You can't hear the birds with a helmet on and I like birds.

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Offline motormike

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #14 on: April 23, 2014, 09:41:51 AM »
Just a story for tib bits sake...not sure if it has any relevance.

I ride with a guy who is 64 years old.  He wears a Schuberth C3 flippy.  He collided with a deer at 65 mph one year ago.  I think his head impacted pretty hard on the pavement.  The impact was to the side of the helmet and was hard enough for the helmet to crack somewhat and the shield to fly off but the modular part stayed intact.  His glasses were still on his face but somewhat askew.  He was knocked unconscious for a few minutes but he's had a history of concussions.

Offline Rincewind

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2014, 12:12:54 PM »
I had maybe 4-5 consecutive flip-up helmets over the years.  I liked not having to remove my glasses.  And I liked being able to flip it up right before sneezing.

Last summer, the night before a multi-day trip, the latch got jammed and the helmet wouldn't open anymore.  I ended up buying a full-face with retractable visor and I don't regret it.

I've had other flip-ups helmets quit latching right on me before, sometimes just from getting knocked onto its side.  I also got tired of slamming it down across my face all the time, and then always checking to make sure it was latched right.  My last one was a real PITA to attach my BT com, because the flip-part took up most of the side of the helmet.

Sure, it's nice to flip it out of the way when stopped in hot weather - but it does make you look stupid when it's up like that.  Yes, really. 

I can deal with removing my glasses and sneezing onto the chin bar.  I can deal with not worrying about the latch.

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2014, 12:31:31 PM »
Sure, it's nice to flip it out of the way when stopped in hot weather - but it does make you look stupid when it's up like that.  Yes, really. 


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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2014, 12:49:41 PM »
Like my Multitec but it's noisy. Might try the Shark next time.
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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2014, 01:08:29 PM »
Like my Multitec but it's noisy. Might try the Shark next time.

The Schuberth C3 is very quite.  I can ride naked bikes and wear no ear protection whatsoever (with clean air).  But, I don't believe it vents as well as other lids.  It can be steamy on warm days.

When I go to replace the C3, I'll most likely go with the Neotec.
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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2014, 01:11:01 PM »
Like my Multitec but it's noisy. Might try the Shark next time.

The Sharks are cheap right now because they're on closeout. I guess they're coming out with a new model. I have one, but I'm in the same place as vulcanbill -- I haven't worn it enough  to make a judgment. The Multitec is much more comfortable but that has more to do with the shape of my head than the design of the helmet. Whoever designed my skull was an amateur.

I don't think it's much quieter than the Shoei, but I'm on an FJR with a large aftermarket screen. Not a good test bed for comparing noise levels.
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Offline Dan K

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2014, 01:41:08 PM »
Great for glasses and talking to other riders/people at quick stops.

Yes but...

I tried one, an HJC symax? I think? I still have it actually. I'm a general fan of HJC but this one I didn't like. Heavy, noisy, and felt very cheaply made. I only half trust that the chin bar won't un-latch and expose my face in a crash, probably just in my head, but I feel safer with a FF. I did like being able to flip it up at a stop light on hot days, but that was the only thing I liked.

Exactly my thoughts. I have a Symax but wore it under 5 times. 

A friend was taken out but a cager crossing the yellow. He glanced off the driver door's "A" pillar but luckily he was wearing a full face.   Still had a concussion and bloody mouth from the impact.  In my opinion, a flip up would have blown off with that type of impact.

I had a Caberg Justissimo as my first flip helmet YEARS AND YEARS ago, which was a little heavy and a little noisy, but the SHoei Neotec is quiet when looking straight ahead, and does not appear heavy, compared to my ridiculously expensive Arai Corsair or my $100 Scorpion EXO-1000.

By the way, the Caberg, the Neotec and the Scorpion (which is not a full face) all had the flip down sun visor, which is the best addition to a helmet ever.

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Offline Dan K

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2014, 02:23:11 PM »
I have the Shark Evoline 2 and the jury is still out.  I haven't done enough riding to really spend any quality time with it.  It's different that a flip up in that it's a true convertible helmet.  The chinbar actually swings back and sits on the back of the helmet.
So basically, you can ride at speed w/ a 3/4 helmet configuration without having your head torn off.  It's heavy but when riding around town it is nice to just flip it over and be in 3/4 mode.  Back on the highway, just reach back and flip it down and lock it.
The locking takes more than a standard flip helmet to latch as there is a down movement then a back movement to fully lock it.  I need to spend more time with it to give a fully informed review.  And since I'm a bit of a helmet whore, I have many choices.  We'll see.

http://www.webbikeworld.com/r2/motorcycle-helmet/shark-evoline-series-2/

There are newer models out.


Interested in your take on this one. Looking forward to a "fully informed review"
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Offline three west

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2014, 06:08:09 PM »

I had a Nolan flip-up years ago and swore that I would NEVER go back to a full face helmet.

Then I got a new bike, and I realized how crazy loud it was, and now I only wear a full face again.

I'd say it depends upon you and your bike and the wind protection in relation to your head.

Offline RBEmerson

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #23 on: May 18, 2014, 12:53:02 AM »
I wear both types. For serious, long haul riding, it's the Schuberth S1 full-face. For local, go-fer runs, it's a Nolan N-103. I also have a Caberg full-face (great sun visor, noisy and poor ventilation - OK for longer local riding spring and fall) and a Caberg Justissimo (great sun visor, noisy, poor venting, now sitting in its box). I've also worn Schuberth C1 & 2. I sold both (mostly noise issues and some fit concerns). The S1 is the second one I bought. #1 wore out. #2 is the Druidi (great graphics, with reflective bits), which is beginning to show its age. I'll miss it when it's time to hang it up.

I agree that flip-ups are better with on-and-off situations. I have yet to find one that's quiet enough, even with good phones or plugs. Ditto for really meaningful ventilation. My K1200RS, with the windshield down gives lots of air flow that, AFAIK, isn't all the chaotic. NTL, these helmets are generally too noisy for slabbing.

The S1 is the quietest helmet and has fair ventilation. I wish I could find a quiet, well ventilated helmet with the Caberg silvered sun visor (most internal visors aren't dense enough for my needs). I wish I could find a pound of $20 bills, too.  :bigsmile:

PS Yes, I wear glasses.
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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #24 on: May 18, 2014, 06:36:52 AM »
I sold my C3 last weekend and rode my bike 40 miles to my dealer wearing my old Arai Quantum II full face with no ear protection.  I picked up a new Shoei Neotec and wore it home.  I couldn't tell the difference in wind noise between the two. 

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Offline Jet-A-Pumper

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #25 on: May 18, 2014, 11:29:15 AM »
Glasses wearer that wore Shoei RF's for years. Was a firm believer, amen. Then tried a modular. Never going back. Evah. Not gonna do it.

Wind noise? Just don't wear earplugs. The tinnitus will cover up that wind noise just fine in no time at all.
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Offline RBEmerson

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #26 on: May 18, 2014, 11:31:24 AM »
Well DOH!!! I just woke up to seeing the C1 in avatar. I liked the concept, thought the sun visor was too narrow (glare up from the road was an issue), and thought it a bit noisy. OTOH, ventilation was very good and well managed. The C2 was, in fact, a step backward from that. I really should scrounge a C3 from my BMW dealer - they have test helmets available.
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Offline mugwump

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #27 on: May 18, 2014, 02:45:02 PM »
Just got an N104 with Ncom. It remains to be seen whether I can connect more than the GPS. I've never thought it was a good idea for me to have distractions while riding, but long hauls on the slab might pass more quickly with some music. Not sure the Ncom will do that.

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #28 on: May 19, 2014, 07:50:46 AM »
I looked at the 104 but just couldn't pull the trigger.

For comms, Sena's SMH10 is da bomb. Now that sidetone (you hear yourself - same thing that a phone does) is supported, life is very good. I have a Zumo 660, it's a bad Bluetooth citizen. NTL Sena has worked hard to get around the Zumo's miserable Bluetooth implementation.
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Offline Mr. Whippy

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #29 on: May 19, 2014, 11:48:03 AM »
I was rear-ended at a stop sign once, while wearing a flip face helmet.  I went over the bars and landed on my back when I tucked.  I hit the back of the helmet.  The flip face stayed latched and operated completely normally after that.  That's about the only data I have on it.   I still prefer flip face helmets for all the reasons listed.

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Re: Flip-face helmets
« Reply #30 on: June 27, 2014, 08:49:30 PM »
For me I started with a Multitec, was good and I still have it; kind of heavy and had to switch visors depending on lighting

The second was a Shuberth Concept; Loved the sunshade well built but was heavy and had poor ventilation.

Third was another Shuberth, a C2; Better lighter and larger sunshade, still suffered from poor ventilation.

Presently I am riding with a Shuberth C3; In short the best helmet I have ever owned, Extremely light, No fog EVER!, Quiet is an understatement (as long as you are in clean wind, turbulence seems to be a noise making issue). Good chin locking latches (worth taking one apart just to see how its made quite impressive) A bit pricy OK way to much $$$ but does come with a nice guarantee from Shuberth

I do enjoy having the option of walking into a bank wearing my helmet (just as long as the face is open) Try that with a full face  ;D 
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