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The Lounge => Off Topic Discussion => Topic started by: sodapop6620 on September 23, 2014, 07:02:08 PM

Title: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 23, 2014, 07:02:08 PM
Post up you history for (each) today.

Planet Neptune Is Discovered (1846)
Neptune is notable for being the first planet to be discovered by way of mathematical prediction rather than standard observation. Galileo observed Neptune twice in the early 1600s, but he mistook the planet for a fixed star and is therefore not credited with its discovery. Centuries later, small changes in Uranus's orbit led astronomers to seek out and discover the eighth and outermost planet of our solar system. Who predicted Neptune's location in the 1840s within 1° of where it was found?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Discovery+of+Neptune (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Discovery+of+Neptune)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 24, 2014, 11:14:31 AM
The first Supreme Court (USA) was instituted under the Judiciary Act 1789.

And:

The Prophet entered Medina at the end of his flight from Mecca (the Hegira) in 622.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Mr. Whippy on September 24, 2014, 12:52:56 PM
1957 Eisenhower orders US troops to desegregate Little Rock schools
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on September 24, 2014, 01:20:19 PM
1960- The USS Enterprise- the first nuclear powered aircraft carrier- was launched.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on September 24, 2014, 01:40:35 PM
Today is the fiftieth anniversary of the premiere of The Munsters. (1964)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on September 24, 2014, 01:40:48 PM
9/24/88

The Grateful Dead at Madison Square Garden.

I was there.

https://archive.org/details/gd88-09-24.sbd.rich.425.sbeok.shnf
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Mr. Whippy on September 24, 2014, 01:42:48 PM
9/24/88

The Grateful Dead at Madison Square Garden.

I was there.

https://archive.org/details/gd88-09-24.sbd.rich.425.sbeok.shnf

Why am I not surprised?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 24, 2014, 01:57:50 PM
9/24/88

The Grateful Dead at Madison Square Garden.

I was there.

https://archive.org/details/gd88-09-24.sbd.rich.425.sbeok.shnf

You lucky bastard.

Why am I not surprised?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on September 24, 2014, 02:06:56 PM
I've been to a lot of Dead shows.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on September 24, 2014, 02:49:31 PM
I've been to a lot of Dead shows.

I'll bet the crowd is really rambunctious at those.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 24, 2014, 03:02:16 PM
Getting bang up to date: The British Prime Minister has recaed Parliament today to decide upon the the whether we should join the US and others in bombing IS and putting boots on the ground in Iraq,

No comment.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Mr. Whippy on September 24, 2014, 03:08:42 PM
I've been to a lot of Dead shows.

If you went west of the Mississippi, my Brother was inevitably at the show.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: PatM on September 24, 2014, 04:03:39 PM
F. Scott Fitzgerald was born on this day Sept 24 1896.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on September 24, 2014, 06:18:59 PM
The trial of the "Chicago Seven", began today in 1969.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Patmo on September 24, 2014, 06:20:54 PM
1948....Honda Motor Company is incorporated.   


As they say, the rest is history.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Skee on September 24, 2014, 08:09:10 PM
9/24/88

The Grateful Dead at Madison Square Garden.

I was there.

https://archive.org/details/gd88-09-24.sbd.rich.425.sbeok.shnf

Thanks for posting this link.  I attended several shows in mid-80s. 

[Don't remember which ones though! LOL]  Now I can listen to what I heard.



On this day in 1870, Georges Claude, inventor of the neon lamp was born. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on September 24, 2014, 08:16:51 PM
9/24/88

The Grateful Dead at Madison Square Garden.

I was there.

[url]https://archive.org/details/gd88-09-24.sbd.rich.425.sbeok.shnf[/url]


Thanks for posting this link.  I attended several shows in mid-80s. 

[Don't remember which ones though! LOL]  Now I can listen to what I heard.



On this day in 1870, Georges Claude, inventor of the neon lamp was born.

http://relisten.net/grateful-dead/


Also, Jim Henson was born on this day in 1936.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on September 24, 2014, 09:10:33 PM
Nevermind by Nirvana is released on this date in 1991. Hair bands cower in fear.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 25, 2014, 02:25:48 AM
Heather Locklear was born Sept.25/61, making the world better for men on earth.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on September 25, 2014, 04:27:34 AM
In 1775 British troops capture Ethan Allen, the hero of Ticonderoga, when he and a handful of Americans try to invade Canada. They have their own furniture,  thank you very much.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on September 25, 2014, 08:39:12 AM
In 1775 British troops capture Ethan Allen, the hero of Ticonderoga, when he and a handful of Americans try to invade Canada. They have their own furniture,  thank you very much.


Reading this siting on my Ethan Allen chair.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Mr. Whippy on September 25, 2014, 09:15:50 AM
In 1775 British troops capture Ethan Allen, the hero of Ticonderoga, when he and a handful of Americans try to invade Canada. They have their own furniture,  thank you very much.


Reading this siting on my Ethan Allen chair.

Why are you siting?  The war's over...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: motormike on September 26, 2014, 01:08:51 PM
Today, bruce Dickinson joined Iron Maiden in 1981. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: satchmo on September 26, 2014, 01:53:13 PM
September 26 (1957):

Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story opens in the Winter Garden Theatre on Broadway.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stevent on September 26, 2014, 03:16:35 PM
On this day in 1964, had a strawberry sunday at the Dairy Queen in Quebec City, I think it was the one on Rue De Champlain but I may be mistaken. Anyway it was by a Roman Catholic church and they of course had a very graphic Crucifix outside. The strawberry syrup on the white ice cream looked just like the blood on the mortified skin of the Crucifix and it looked just like Jesus was watching me eat this ice cream sunday....

Anyway it freaked me out because I was only 6 years old at the time...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on September 26, 2014, 04:51:43 PM
Today, in 1944, Operation Market-Garden fails as thousands of British and Polish paratroopers are killed, captured and wounded. Of more than 10,000 soldiers, only about 2,900 were able to cross the Meuse River back to Allied lines.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on September 26, 2014, 04:52:39 PM
DQ does stigmata on sundaes?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: giaka on September 26, 2014, 06:53:05 PM
Yesterday in 1980 John Bonham died.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on September 26, 2014, 08:15:30 PM
Yesterday in 1980 John Bonham died.

 :'(
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on September 26, 2014, 08:28:26 PM
Yesterday in 1980 John Bonham died.

Bang a drum. If you can keep up.

Bonham and Jp Jones would lay down some solid shit and Page could jerk off and who cared what Bobby sang.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on September 26, 2014, 09:11:59 PM
Yesterday in 1980 John Bonham died.

Bang a drum. If you can keep up.

Bonham and Jp Jones would lay down some solid shit and Page could jerk off and who cared what Bobby sang.


Damn straight. John Paul Jones contributed so much and the 2 stage men took all the credit. Mandolin? JPJ.

Quote
Gear[edit]
Bass guitars[edit]
1962 Fender Jazz Bass (used in studio and live performances)
1952 Fender Precision Bass with the finish removed (used to play "Black Dog" and other songs live from 1971–1975)
Fretless Fender Precision Bass
Gibson EB-1 (seen on the inner wheel of Led Zeppelin III)
Fender Bass V
Alembic Bruce Becvar 8 string Triple Omega
Alembic Series II 4 string
Manson E-35 4 String Bass
Manson E-30 4 String Bass (Single Pickup)
Manson 8 String Bass
Manson 10 String Bass
Manson 12 String Bass
Manson Bass Mandolin
Acoustic Control Corporation 360 Bass Amp
SWR SM 900 Bass Amp
SWR Goliath III Cabinet
SWR Son of Bertha Cabinet
SWR Big Ben Cabinet
Mandolins[edit]
Jones owns many mandolins made by Andy Manson, including a triple neck mandolin, octave mandolin, octave mandola, and mando cello. His main mandolin is a Manson F style mandolin.

Keyboard instruments[edit]
Hammond organs
Hohner Clavinet
Hohner Electra-Piano
Fender Rhodes
Mellotron
Steinway piano
Yamaha CP-80 piano
Yamaha GX-1 Synthesizer
Symbolic Sound Kyma system
Korg Trinity synthesiser
Korg M3 synthesiser (used with Them Crooked Vultures)
Korg X50 used at Led Zeppelin 2007 reunion concert
EMS VCS3 Synthesizer
Moog Minimoog Model D
Moog 15 Modular Synthesizer
Korg Kaossilator
Korg Oasys
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 27, 2014, 04:38:40 AM
Sept 27 1939, Poland surrenders.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 27, 2014, 06:42:36 AM
The world's first steam locomotive passenger railway opens between Stockton and Darlington
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jet-A-Pumper on September 27, 2014, 08:05:08 AM
1908 – The first production of the Ford Model T automobile was built at the Piquette Plant in Detroit, Michigan.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on September 27, 2014, 09:25:16 AM
Gerneralismo Frederico Franco is still dead.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on September 27, 2014, 02:33:29 PM
Gerneralismo Frederico Franco is still dead.

Should we send flowers?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on September 27, 2014, 04:34:44 PM
Jimmy Doolittle passes in 1993 at the age of 96.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on September 27, 2014, 06:01:55 PM
Payton was born.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on September 28, 2014, 05:05:14 AM
28th September 1964, Harpo Marx died.

Sent from here using smoke and mirrors

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 28, 2014, 06:01:12 AM
Again in 1964
The Warren Commission report into the assassination of US President John F Kennedy is made public and finds 'no conspiracy'.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on September 29, 2014, 08:10:14 AM
29th September 1829, 185 years ago, officers of the newly formed Metropolitan Police first patrolled the streets of London.

Sent from here using smoke and mirrors

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 29, 2014, 09:42:35 AM
101 years ago today, Rudolph Diesel disappeared from the steamer Dresden, enroute to London from Begium, and his body was found 10 days later in the North Sea, near Norway.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 29, 2014, 12:07:12 PM
101 years ago today, Rudolph Diesel disappeared from the steamer Dresden, enroute to London from Begium, and his body was found 10 days later in the North Sea, near Norway.

Well, at least they named a smelly engine after him.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on September 29, 2014, 12:10:11 PM
The sun will rise in the east and set in the west. Just the same it has for the last xxxxxxxxxxx Years.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on September 29, 2014, 12:10:47 PM
Today is National Coffee Day.

Go get some.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 29, 2014, 01:20:02 PM
101 years ago today, Rudolph Diesel disappeared from the steamer Dresden, enroute to London from Begium, and his body was found 10 days later in the North Sea, near Norway.

Well, at least they named a smelly engine after him.

Which gives Jeremy Clarkson one more thing to complain about.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stevent on September 29, 2014, 02:13:35 PM
29th September 1829, 185 years ago, officers of the newly formed Metropolitan Police first patrolled the streets of London.

Sent from here using smoke and mirrors


Bloody Peelers..


 :bash:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: PatM on September 29, 2014, 03:49:49 PM
Miguel de Cervantes (Author of Don Quixote) was born on this day in 1547.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 30, 2014, 08:56:39 AM
First Photos Taken of a Giant Squid in the Wild (2004)
In 2004, two teams of Japanese researchers traveled to a sperm whale hunting ground south of Tokyo, where they attached bait, a camera, and a flash to a 3,000-foot (914-m) line. After numerous attempts to lure their prey, a 26-foot (8-m) giant squid attacked and became entangled in the lure, breaking free after more than 500 photos were taken over a four-hour period. What did the photos—the first ever taken of a live giant squid in its natural habitat—reveal about the mysterious creature?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/giant+squid (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/giant+squid)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 30, 2014, 08:58:49 AM
The sun will rise in the east and set in the west. Just the same it has for the last xxxxxxxxxxx Years.

People still think the Sun rises and sets, when it is really the Earths rotation that moves areas into and out of the Suns reach.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on September 30, 2014, 09:24:31 AM
The sun will rise in the east and set in the west. Just the same it has for the last xxxxxxxxxxx Years.


People still think the Sun rises and sets, when it is really the Earths rotation that moves areas into and out of the Suns reach.


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 30, 2014, 10:00:19 AM
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on September 30, 2014, 10:02:03 AM
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 30, 2014, 04:11:12 PM
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on October 01, 2014, 02:47:02 AM
This day in 1982 the first commercially available CD player, the  Sony CDP-101 went on sale.

Sent from here using smoke and mirrors

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 01, 2014, 05:22:47 AM
Jimmy Carter was born 10/1/24
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Napper on October 01, 2014, 04:21:51 PM
This day in 1982 the first commercially available CD player, the  Sony CDP-101 went on sale.

Sent from here using smoke and mirrors

 at a list price of 168,000 yen (approx $730).

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Mr. Whippy on October 02, 2014, 06:30:07 AM
October 2, 1883

The first train from Portland, Oregon to New York City, New York traveled through The Dalles, Oregon.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 03, 2014, 06:29:10 AM
Stevie Ray Vaughan was born today back in 1954.
Stevie Ray Vaughan (1954)
Vaughan's career as a professional musician was tragically cut short when he was killed in a helicopter crash in 1990, but in the short time he spent in the industry, he helped inspire a blues-rock revival and secured his reputation as one of the greatest guitarists of all time. His trio's 1989 album In Step won a Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Blues Album, as did the posthumously released Family Style, featuring Vaughan and his brother Jimmie. What was Vaughan's "first wife"?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Stevie+Ray+Vaughan (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Stevie+Ray+Vaughan)

What a musician!!!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: redbandit14 on October 03, 2014, 01:04:30 PM
1918-  Captain John MacGregor of the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles Battalion earned the Victoria Cross near Cambrai ,France
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: squeezer on October 03, 2014, 03:11:05 PM
1989:  Art Shell becomes the first African American head coach in the NFL.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on October 04, 2014, 03:45:07 AM
57 years ago today Sputnik was launched.

Sent from here using smoke and mirrors

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: squeezer on October 04, 2014, 11:14:50 AM
On this day in 1970, Janis Joplin died. She was 27.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 04, 2014, 11:22:08 AM
On this day in 1970, Janis Joplin died. She was 27.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on October 04, 2014, 11:36:34 AM
On this day in 1970, Janis Joplin died. She was 27.

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John, you dirty old man.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 04, 2014, 12:25:36 PM
I was 7 when this pic was taken. They're both dead.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Mr. Whippy on October 04, 2014, 12:58:26 PM
I was 7 when this pic was taken. They're both dead.

You're Janis Joplin's son? 


Whoa. :eek:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 05, 2014, 02:22:09 PM
Rodney Dangerfield passed on this day in '04.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 06, 2014, 07:43:41 AM
     The Reno brothers carry out the first train robbery in U.S. history, 1866
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 06, 2014, 07:48:32 AM
1908 Yankees lose 100th game of year go 51-103 for season
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on October 06, 2014, 09:11:07 AM
1871 The Great Chicago Fire begins.


On this day in 1871, flames spark in the Chicago barn of Patrick and Catherine O'Leary, igniting a two-day blaze that kills between 200 and 300 people, destroys 17,450 buildings, leaves 100,000 homeless and causes an estimated $200 million (in 1871 dollars; $3 billion in 2007 dollars) in damages. Legend has it that a cow kicked over a lantern in the O'Leary barn and started the fire, but other theories hold that humans or even a comet may have been responsible for the event that left four square miles of the Windy City, including its business district, in ruins. Dry weather and an abundance of wooden buildings, streets and sidewalks made Chicago vulnerable to fire. The city averaged two fires per day in 1870; there were 20 fires throughout Chicago the week before the Great Fire of 1871.

Despite the fire's devastation, much of Chicago's physical infrastructure, including its water, sewage and transportation systems, remained intact. Reconstruction efforts began quickly and spurred great economic development and population growth, as architects laid the foundation for a modern city featuring the world's first skyscrapers. At the time of the fire, Chicago's population was approximately 324,000; within nine years, there were 500,000 Chicagoans. By 1893, the city was a major economic and transportation hub with an estimated population of 1.5 million. That same year, Chicago was chosen to host the World's Columbian Exposition, a major tourist attraction visited by 27.5 million people, or approximately half the U.S. population at the time.

In 1997, the Chicago City Council exonerated Mrs. O'Leary and her cow. She turned into a recluse after the fire, and died in 1895.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on October 06, 2014, 09:12:48 AM
2003 Arnold Schwarzenegger becomes California governor
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 07, 2014, 02:45:52 PM
Edgar Allen Poe died.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on October 07, 2014, 03:24:09 PM
Henry Ford put the "continuous assembly line" into place at his Highland Park auto plant, reducing the time it took to build a Model T from 12 1/2 hours to 6. Within a year, a Model T was coming off the production line every 93 minutes.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 08, 2014, 12:20:29 PM
On October 7, 1806, Antoine Romaine was put in the pillory for running a common bawdy house.
That's Canada, eh?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 08, 2014, 01:09:11 PM
Yesterday in history (sorry, missed this one), the most important battle between the Muslim and Christian world took place, near Lepanto. Twas a sea battle, one which stopped the otherwise inexorable rise of the Ottoman Caliphate.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 09, 2014, 11:20:31 AM
John Lennon was born today, 1940.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: PatM on October 09, 2014, 01:28:53 PM
On this day in 1954, Diamond Dave (David Lee Roth) was born in Bloomington, Indiana, USA
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 09, 2014, 01:58:11 PM
The Korean alphabet was invented today, back in 1446.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: giaka on October 09, 2014, 06:57:35 PM
 1979 – No. 1 Chart Toppers Pop Hit: “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough,” Michael Jackson.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 10, 2014, 04:56:17 AM
The billiard ball was patented by John Wesley Hyatt, in 1865.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 10, 2014, 01:15:30 PM
The billiard ball was patented by John Wesley Hyatt, in 1865.

Fucker.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 11, 2014, 12:04:39 PM
During the American Revolution, a British fleet under Sir Guy Carleton defeats 15 American gunboats under the command of Brigadier General Benedict Arnold at the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain, New York. Although nearly all of Arnold's ship were destroyed, it took more than two days for the British to subdue the Patriot naval force, delaying Carleton's campaign and giving the Patriot ground forces adequate time to prepare a crucial defense of New York.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stevent on October 11, 2014, 01:16:20 PM
During the American Revolution, a British fleet under Sir Guy Carleton defeats 15 American gunboats under the command of Brigadier General Benedict Arnold at the Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain, New York. Although nearly all of Arnold's ship were destroyed, it took more than two days for the British to subdue the Patriot naval force, delaying Carleton's campaign and giving the Patriot ground forces adequate time to prepare a crucial defense of New York.


Fucking traitors and rebels should have been keel hauled and their ships burned to the waterline.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 12, 2014, 09:04:47 AM
General (Vinegar) Joe Stillwell died today in 1946.
Quote
Gen. George C. Marshall declared (him) "far-sighted" and "one of the exceptionally brilliant and cultured men in the Army...qualified for any command in peace or war".
Chennault's main adversary in China.  :lol:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 14, 2014, 03:16:18 PM
1983         Prime Minister of Grenada Maurice Bishop overthrown and later executed by a military coup.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on October 14, 2014, 04:06:56 PM
Generalisimo Fredrico Franco is still dead.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 14, 2014, 04:14:03 PM
Generalisimo Fredrico Franco is still dead.


As is Buckwheat

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on October 14, 2014, 04:31:19 PM
I thought that was Gumby Dammit!

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 14, 2014, 04:41:39 PM
Buckwheat has been shot.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Stickman on October 15, 2014, 10:08:41 AM
1881 - 1st American fishing magazine, American Angler published (after first edition, readers were hooked...)
1939 - LaGuardia Airport opens in NYC
1951 - I Love Lucy debuts on CBS
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 15, 2014, 10:23:56 AM
1997         Andy Green of the UK becomes the first person to break the sound barrier in the Earth's atmosphere, driving the ThrustSSC supersonic car to a record 763 mph (1,228 km/h).
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 15, 2014, 02:53:27 PM
1863 - For the second time, the Confederate submarine H L Hunley sinks during a practice dive in Charleston Harbor, this time drowning its inventor along with seven crew members.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 16, 2014, 09:28:37 AM
1793 Queen Marie Antoinette is beheaded by guillotine during the French Revolution.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on October 16, 2014, 05:30:31 PM
Chevrolet begins to sell a car-truck hybrid that it calls the El Camino. Inspired by the Ford Ranchero, which had already been on the market for two years, the El Camino was a combination sedan-pickup truck built on the Impala body, with the same "cat's eye" taillights and dramatic rear fins. It was, ads trilled, "the most beautiful thing that ever shouldered a load!" "It rides and handles like a convertible," Chevy said, "yet hauls and hustles like the workingest thing on wheels."

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 :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 17, 2014, 12:47:34 AM
1933 Due to rising anti-Semitism and anti-intellectualism in Hitler's Germany, Albert Einstein immigrates to the United States. He makes his new home in Princeton, N.J.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on October 17, 2014, 06:43:31 AM
Evil Knievel was born in 1938.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 17, 2014, 05:54:52 PM
Moe, Larry, and Joe release the Three Stooges "short", "Rusty Romeos" in 1957.
"Hello!"  :wave:

http://youtu.be/74pVk4KKX5s (http://youtu.be/74pVk4KKX5s)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on October 17, 2014, 08:55:55 PM
On this day, 200 years ago, the London beer flood:

Quote
On October 17, 1814, a three-story-high vat of beer exploded inside a London brewery and unleashed a tidal wave of porter that killed eight people in the neighboring tenements. On the 200th anniversary of the London Beer Flood, look back at one of history’s strangest disasters.


http://www.history.com/news/the-london-beer-flood-200-years-ago/?cmpid=Social_Facebook_HITH_10172014_1 (http://www.history.com/news/the-london-beer-flood-200-years-ago/?cmpid=Social_Facebook_HITH_10172014_1)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 18, 2014, 05:26:33 AM
Today, in 1867, the rules for American football are formulated at meeting in New York among delegates from Columbia, Rutgers, Princeton and Yale universities, confusing the rest of the world for the following 147 years.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 18, 2014, 05:35:05 AM
1867 The Alaska territory is formally transferred to the U.S. from Russian control.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 18, 2014, 07:48:45 AM
Texas Instruments Announces First Commercial Transistor Radio (1954)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 18, 2014, 08:27:26 AM

1967-A Russian unmanned spacecraft makes the first landing on the surface of Venus.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 18, 2014, 02:42:00 PM
1956, 21-year-old Elvis Presley pulled into a Memphis gas station where he started to attract a small crowd of autograph seekers. After repeatedly asking Elvis to move on so he could resume normal business, station manager Ed Hopper slapped Presley on the head and found himself on the receiving end of a punch in the face from Elvis. Station employee Aubrey Brown tried to help his boss, but was no match for Presley. After police are called, Hopper and Brown were charged with assault and were fined $25 and $15 respectively.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on October 18, 2014, 05:36:39 PM
1956, 21-year-old Elvis Presley pulled into a Memphis gas station where he started to attract a small crowd of autograph seekers. After repeatedly asking Elvis to move on so he could resume normal business, station manager Ed Hopper slapped Presley on the head and found himself on the receiving end of a punch in the face from Elvis. Station employee Aubrey Brown tried to help his boss, but was no match for Presley. After police are called, Hopper and Brown were charged with assault and were fined $25 and $15 respectively.

Bitch slap from Elvis? Seriously?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 19, 2014, 06:38:04 AM
1739 England declares war on Spain over borderlines in Florida. The War is known as the War of Jenkins' Ear because the Spanish coast guards cut off the ear of British seaman Robert Jenkins.

1781 Major General Lord Charles Cornwallis surrenders to George Washington and Count de Rochambeau at Yorktown, Va. Cornwallis surrenders 7,157 troops, including sick and wounded, and 840 sailors, along with 244 artillery pieces. Losses in this battle had been light on both sides. The Revolutionary War is effectively ended.

1917 The first doughnut is fried by Salvation Army volunteer women for American troops in France during World War I.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 19, 2014, 07:41:12 AM

1949 The People's Republic of China is formally proclaimed.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 19, 2014, 03:31:07 PM
In 1216, King John of England died after consuming what was described as an excessive number of peaches and too much beer.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on October 19, 2014, 04:31:00 PM
In 1216, King John of England died after consuming what was described as an excessive number of peaches and too much beer.

Fermentation can be a bitch.


Peter Tosh born, 1944.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on October 19, 2014, 08:43:23 PM
Missed it by 2 days (17th).

35 years ago "the spreadsheet" was born.

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/10/behold-the-awesome-power-of-the-spreadsheet/381604/ (http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/10/behold-the-awesome-power-of-the-spreadsheet/381604/)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 20, 2014, 01:19:31 AM
In 1216, King John of England died after consuming what was described as an excessive number of peaches and too much beer.

I was taught it was a "surfeit of eels."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 20, 2014, 03:37:53 PM
October 20, 1987:
•USAF LTV A-7D-4-CV Corsair II, 69-6207, of the 4450th Tactical Group, Nellis AFB, Nevada, loses all power 15 miles S of Indianapolis, Indiana at 31,000 feet while en route from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Tinker AFB, Oklahoma. Pilot tries to dead-stick into Indianapolis International Airport but receives poor direction from air traffic controllers and crashes at ~0915 hrs. during late turn after aiming plane at a baseball field but fighter veers, striking bank branch roof and hitting center of Ramada Inn across the street, killing nine employees, injuring five others (one of whom died later as a result of the injuries sustained). Pilot Maj. Bruce L. Teagarden, 35, ejected, suffering bruises and muscle strain. He lands in parking lot of Ace Supply Company, four blocks from the hotel. Air Force pays out $50,427 in property claims damages, according to The New York Times on 26 October. This A-7D was part of the unit then secretly operating Lockheed F-117A Nighthawk stealth aircraft but this was successfully kept out of the media for several years.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 21, 2014, 07:36:21 AM
1096- Seljuk Turks at Chivitot slaughter thousands of German crusaders.

1837- Under a flag of truce during peace talks, U.S. troops siege the Indian Seminole Chief Osceola in Florida.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 21, 2014, 09:28:41 AM
Alfred Nobel was born today back in 1833.  I bet you it was a BANG! :firedevil:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on October 21, 2014, 12:43:29 PM
A British fleet under Admiral Lord Nelson, defeats a combined French and Spanish fleet at the Battle of Trafalgar, fought off the coast of Spain.

The battle raged at its fiercest around HMS Victory, and a French sniper shot Nelson in the shoulder and chest. The admiral was taken below and died about 30 minutes before the end of the battle. Nelson's last words, after being informed that victory was imminent, were "Now I am satisfied. Thank God I have done my duty."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: giaka on October 21, 2014, 01:02:05 PM
Meant to post this yesterday.

Lynyrd Skynyrd plane crash

Following a performance at the Greenville Memorial Auditorium in Greenville, South Carolina, on October 20, 1977 the band boarded a chartered Convair CV-300 to Baton Rouge, Louisiana where they were scheduled to appear at LSU the following night. Due to a faulty engine, the airplane ran low on fuel and the pilots were diverted to the McComb-Pike County Airport. After running out of fuel they attempted an emergency landing before crashing in a heavily forested area five miles northeast of Gillsburg, Mississippi.[14][15] Ronnie Van Zant, Steve Gaines, Cassie Gaines, assistant road manager Dean Kilpatrick, pilot Walter McCreary and co-pilot William Gray were killed on impact; the other band members (Collins, Rossington, Wilkeson, Powell, Pyle, and Hawkins), tour manager Ron Eckerman,[16] and road crew suffered serious injuries.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 21, 2014, 01:37:23 PM
Nelson's last words, after being informed that victory was imminent, were "Now I am satisfied. Thank God I have done my duty."

Nah, it was "kiss me, Hardy".
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 23, 2014, 06:25:13 AM
Top this!
4004BC - According to 17th century divine James Ussher, Archbishop of Armagh, and Dr. John Lightfoot of Cambridge, the world was created on this day, a Sunday, at 9 a.m.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 23, 2014, 02:46:56 PM
1915
25,000 women marched in New York City, demanding the right to vote.


Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on October 23, 2014, 08:14:19 PM
Top this!
4004BC - According to 17th century divine James Ussher, Archbishop of Armagh, and Dr. John Lightfoot of Cambridge, the world was created on this day, a Sunday, at 9 a.m.

Well I guess that settles it.   :bigsmile:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 24, 2014, 06:23:37 AM
Closer to my home:

Quote
On this day in 1901, a 63-year-old schoolteacher named Annie Edson Taylor becomes the first person to take the plunge over Niagara Falls in a barrel. 












Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 24, 2014, 06:49:20 AM

1929-Black Thursday–the first day of the stock market crash which began the Great Depression.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 25, 2014, 05:46:08 AM
Oct.25, 1964
The Rolling Stones appeared for the first time on The Ed Sullivan Show from New York, performing ‘Around And Around’ and ‘Time Is On My Side’. A riot brook out in the studio, prompting Sullivan’s infamous quote, ‘I promise you they’ll never be back on our show again.’ The Rolling Stones went on to make a further five appearances on Sullivan’s show between 1965 and 1969.
 :wings:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 28, 2014, 07:29:50 AM
Today's birthday.

Bernie Ecclestone (1930)
Ecclestone is a controversial British business magnate and one of the most powerful people in the world of Formula One (F1) racing. Briefly a racer, he gave up the sport after several accidents but later returned as a manager and team owner. In the 1970s, he secured his position in the F1 organization by negotiating TV broadcasting rights, vastly increasing the sport's popularity.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on October 28, 2014, 08:05:29 AM
The Cuban Missile Crisis comes to an end


The Cuban Missile crisis comes to a close as Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev agrees to remove Russian missiles from Cuba in exchange for a promise from the United States to respect Cuba's territorial sovereignty. This ended nearly two weeks of anxiety and tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union that came close to provoking a nuclear conflict. The consequences of the crisis were many and varied. Relations between Cuba and the Soviet Union were on shaky ground for some time after Khrushchev's removal of the missiles, as Fidel Castro accused the Russians of backing down from the Americans and deserting the Cuban revolution. European allies of the United States were also angered, not because of the U.S. stance during the crisis, but because the Kennedy administration kept them virtually in the dark about negotiations that might have led to an atomic war.

Inside the Soviet Union, hard-liners were appalled at Khrushchev's withdrawal of the weapons. Two years later, in 1964, Leonid Brezhnev and Aleksei Kosygin pushed him from power and proceeded to lead the Soviet Union on a massive military buildup. There was perhaps one positive aspect of the crisis. Having gone to the edge of what President Kennedy referred to as the "abyss of destruction," cooler heads in both nations initiated steps to begin some control over nuclear weapons. Less than a year after the crisis ended, the United States and Soviet Union signed an agreement to end aboveground testing; in 1968, both nations signed a non-proliferation treaty.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 28, 2014, 08:23:42 AM

1636- Harvard College, the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States, is founded in Cambridge, Mass.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: PatM on October 28, 2014, 08:36:31 AM
1955 - William "Bill" Gates, the chairman and CEO of Microsoft Corporation, the world's largest software firm.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 28, 2014, 03:49:51 PM
312    Constantine the Great defeats Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius at the Mulvian Bridge.

Bastard. Maxentius is supposed to be an ancestor of mine. I shall never forgive Constantine. Ever.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 29, 2014, 05:59:07 AM
Duane Allman rode into the side of a flat-bed trailer and was killed on his motorcycle, today in 1971.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 29, 2014, 07:05:03 AM

1945-The first ball-point pen goes is sold by Gimbell's department store in New York for a price of $12.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on October 29, 2014, 07:31:32 AM
Duane Allman rode into the side of a flat-bed trailer and was killed on his motorcycle, today in 1971.

A very sad day.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Formerly Known as Bigfoot on October 29, 2014, 07:52:42 AM
Closer to my home:

Quote
On this day in 1901, a 63-year-old schoolteacher named Annie Edson Taylor becomes the first person to take the plunge over Niagara Falls in a barrel.

Were you there to watch? 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: xsrider on October 29, 2014, 12:28:52 PM
1945:  The first ball-point pen is sold by Gimbell's department store in New York for a price of $12

1969:  First computer-to-computer link; the link is accomplished through ARPANET, forerunner of the Internet.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: squeezer on October 29, 2014, 01:19:51 PM
Duane Allman rode into the side of a flat-bed trailer and was killed on his motorcycle, today in 1971.

A very sad day.

Very much so.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 30, 2014, 06:19:55 AM

1938- H.G. Wells' War of the Worlds is broadcast over the radio by Orson Welles' Mercury Theatre. Many panic believing it is an actual newscast about a Martian invasion.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 30, 2014, 06:27:53 AM
1961         The USSR detonates "Tsar Bomba," a 50-megaton hydrogen bomb; it is still the largest explosive device of any kind over detonated.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on October 30, 2014, 12:37:37 PM
"Rumble in the Jungle" 40 years ago today.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 30, 2014, 05:09:45 PM
You beat me too it.

It is also Charles Atlas (1892) birthday.  AKA A scrawny youth, Angelo Siciliano, better known as "Charles Atlas," built up his physique using a system of exercises he developed that worked muscles against each other and in 1922 was dubbed "The World's Most Perfectly Developed Man."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 31, 2014, 07:27:20 AM

1984= Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi is assassinated in New Delhi by two Sikh members of her bodyguard.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 31, 2014, 09:57:23 AM
The Battle of Britain Is Won (1940)

Where are you Papa :headscratch:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on October 31, 2014, 10:18:31 AM
The Battle of Britain Is Won (1940)

Where are you Papa :headscratch:


Hiding under a rock.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Chronic on October 31, 2014, 10:39:49 AM
Just saw a reference in the paper this morning about this day in 1840-something was the day of the big snow storm that doomed the Donner Party in the Sierras near Truckee ( near to lake Tahoe)

As a matter of fact, there will be a snow storm up there today........ to commemorate, I guess??


Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 31, 2014, 01:57:18 PM
Winnie was donated to Regent's Park Zoo, and so began a story:


Winnie-the-Pooh's Winnipeg connection began in August of 1914 when a young veterinarian, Lieutenant Harry Colebourn, enlisted in the Canadian army. Harry's regiment, The Fort Garry Horse, soon left Winnipeg on a train bound for Quebec. The train stopped at White River, Ontario. There, on the station platform, Harry spotted a hunter carrying an orphaned black bear cub. Harry bought the cub for twenty dollars and they continued on their journey together. Harry named the bear Winnie after his current home base of Winnipeg. The two soon became good friends and after a short stay in Quebec they sailed for England. While camped at Salisbury Plain Winnie stayed in Colebourn's tent, slept under his cot, and became a favourite of the Canadian soldiers. When Lt. Colebourn's unit was ordered to the battlefields of France, Harry placed Winnie in the London Zoo for safekeeping. Four years later, in 1918, Harry returned to London to take Winnie home. It didn't take long for Harry to realize what a hit Winnie was with the children. Harry donated Winnie to the London Zoo permanently and Harry, now a Captain, returned to Winnipeg alone.

Among the many visitors to London Zoo was a young boy named Christopher Robin and his father A. A. Milne. Christopher Robin adored Winnie and renamed his stuffed teddy Winnie-the-Pooh. Shortly afterwards A.A. Milne began writing stories based on the adventures of his son's toy animals. The books of Pooh stories became an instant success and Winnie-the-Pooh is still beloved by children to this day.

Winnipeg continues to celebrate its unique relationship with the exuberant Winnie-the-Pooh. In the city's Assiniboine Park you will find two special Winnie tributes: a bronze statue of Captain Colebourn and Winnie, and an original oil portrait of Winnie-the-Pooh by the illustrator Ernest H. Shepard - forever linking Winnie-the-Pooh to the city which gave him its name.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 31, 2014, 01:57:56 PM
The Battle of Britain Is Won (1940)

Where are you Papa :headscratch:

In excelsis Deo, as usual.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on October 31, 2014, 02:18:00 PM
Winnie was donated to Regent's Park Zoo, and so began a story:


Winnie-the-Pooh's Winnipeg connection began in August of 1914 when a young veterinarian, Lieutenant Harry Colebourn, enlisted in the Canadian army. Harry's regiment, The Fort Garry Horse, soon left Winnipeg on a train bound for Quebec. The train stopped at White River, Ontario. There, on the station platform, Harry spotted a hunter carrying an orphaned black bear cub. Harry bought the cub for twenty dollars and they continued on their journey together. Harry named the bear Winnie after his current home base of Winnipeg. The two soon became good friends and after a short stay in Quebec they sailed for England. While camped at Salisbury Plain Winnie stayed in Colebourn's tent, slept under his cot, and became a favourite of the Canadian soldiers. When Lt. Colebourn's unit was ordered to the battlefields of France, Harry placed Winnie in the London Zoo for safekeeping. Four years later, in 1918, Harry returned to London to take Winnie home. It didn't take long for Harry to realize what a hit Winnie was with the children. Harry donated Winnie to the London Zoo permanently and Harry, now a Captain, returned to Winnipeg alone.

Among the many visitors to London Zoo was a young boy named Christopher Robin and his father A. A. Milne. Christopher Robin adored Winnie and renamed his stuffed teddy Winnie-the-Pooh. Shortly afterwards A.A. Milne began writing stories based on the adventures of his son's toy animals. The books of Pooh stories became an instant success and Winnie-the-Pooh is still beloved by children to this day.

Winnipeg continues to celebrate its unique relationship with the exuberant Winnie-the-Pooh. In the city's Assiniboine Park you will find two special Winnie tributes: a bronze statue of Captain Colebourn and Winnie, and an original oil portrait of Winnie-the-Pooh by the illustrator Ernest H. Shepard - forever linking Winnie-the-Pooh to the city which gave him its name.



Know the story.
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White River.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 31, 2014, 03:10:01 PM
On October 31, 1957, the Japanese car company Toyota establishes its U.S. headquarters in an old Rambler dealership in Hollywood.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on October 31, 2014, 04:55:37 PM
Winnie was donated to Regent's Park Zoo, and so began a story:


Winnie-the-Pooh's Winnipeg connection began in August of 1914 when a young veterinarian, Lieutenant Harry Colebourn, enlisted in the Canadian army. Harry's regiment, The Fort Garry Horse, soon left Winnipeg on a train bound for Quebec. The train stopped at White River, Ontario. There, on the station platform, Harry spotted a hunter carrying an orphaned black bear cub. Harry bought the cub for twenty dollars and they continued on their journey together. Harry named the bear Winnie after his current home base of Winnipeg. The two soon became good friends and after a short stay in Quebec they sailed for England. While camped at Salisbury Plain Winnie stayed in Colebourn's tent, slept under his cot, and became a favourite of the Canadian soldiers. When Lt. Colebourn's unit was ordered to the battlefields of France, Harry placed Winnie in the London Zoo for safekeeping. Four years later, in 1918, Harry returned to London to take Winnie home. It didn't take long for Harry to realize what a hit Winnie was with the children. Harry donated Winnie to the London Zoo permanently and Harry, now a Captain, returned to Winnipeg alone.

Among the many visitors to London Zoo was a young boy named Christopher Robin and his father A. A. Milne. Christopher Robin adored Winnie and renamed his stuffed teddy Winnie-the-Pooh. Shortly afterwards A.A. Milne began writing stories based on the adventures of his son's toy animals. The books of Pooh stories became an instant success and Winnie-the-Pooh is still beloved by children to this day.

Winnipeg continues to celebrate its unique relationship with the exuberant Winnie-the-Pooh. In the city's Assiniboine Park you will find two special Winnie tributes: a bronze statue of Captain Colebourn and Winnie, and an original oil portrait of Winnie-the-Pooh by the illustrator Ernest H. Shepard - forever linking Winnie-the-Pooh to the city which gave him its name.



Know the story.
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 ([url]http://mxvet.smugmug.com/Other/posting-pics/28327217_XrJtxt#[/url]!i=2900277452&k=6db5JDQ&lb=1&s=A)

White River.


I was just searching my pictures in vain for that shot.  Nice catch Ed.  I have been there a few times.   :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on October 31, 2014, 06:42:24 PM
Winnie was donated to Regent's Park Zoo, and so began a story:


Winnie-the-Pooh's Winnipeg connection began in August of 1914 when a young veterinarian, Lieutenant Harry Colebourn, enlisted in the Canadian army. Harry's regiment, The Fort Garry Horse, soon left Winnipeg on a train bound for Quebec. The train stopped at White River, Ontario. There, on the station platform, Harry spotted a hunter carrying an orphaned black bear cub. Harry bought the cub for twenty dollars and they continued on their journey together. Harry named the bear Winnie after his current home base of Winnipeg. The two soon became good friends and after a short stay in Quebec they sailed for England. While camped at Salisbury Plain Winnie stayed in Colebourn's tent, slept under his cot, and became a favourite of the Canadian soldiers. When Lt. Colebourn's unit was ordered to the battlefields of France, Harry placed Winnie in the London Zoo for safekeeping. Four years later, in 1918, Harry returned to London to take Winnie home. It didn't take long for Harry to realize what a hit Winnie was with the children. Harry donated Winnie to the London Zoo permanently and Harry, now a Captain, returned to Winnipeg alone.

Among the many visitors to London Zoo was a young boy named Christopher Robin and his father A. A. Milne. Christopher Robin adored Winnie and renamed his stuffed teddy Winnie-the-Pooh. Shortly afterwards A.A. Milne began writing stories based on the adventures of his son's toy animals. The books of Pooh stories became an instant success and Winnie-the-Pooh is still beloved by children to this day.

Winnipeg continues to celebrate its unique relationship with the exuberant Winnie-the-Pooh. In the city's Assiniboine Park you will find two special Winnie tributes: a bronze statue of Captain Colebourn and Winnie, and an original oil portrait of Winnie-the-Pooh by the illustrator Ernest H. Shepard - forever linking Winnie-the-Pooh to the city which gave him its name.



Know the story.
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White River.


I was just searching my pictures in vain for that shot.  Nice catch Ed.  I have been there a few times.   :thumbsup: :thumbsup:


I've got some better ones but there on my other computer.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 01, 2014, 07:22:33 AM
On this day in 1967, Cool Hand Luke, starring Paul Newman as a tough, anti-authoritarian, poker-playing prisoner, debuts in theaters. Newman received a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his portrayal of the jail-breaking Luke Jackson, whom the American Film Institute in 2003 named one of the top 50 greatest movie heroes in history.
Remember the "car-wash" scene?
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 01, 2014, 08:00:03 AM
1512   - Michelangelo's painting on the Sistine Chapel ceiling is exhibited for the first time.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 01, 2014, 02:09:46 PM

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I'm sorry did you say something?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on November 01, 2014, 02:28:07 PM

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I'm sorry did you say something?


Uh.....yeah.....whatever he said. It's been a few years. I may need to watch it again.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 01, 2014, 03:50:35 PM
Well, a man can only look at so many Pooh pictures...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on November 01, 2014, 05:52:18 PM
Exactly. Especially if he has multiple grandkids.  ;D
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 03, 2014, 03:51:09 PM
November 3, 1883
The U.S. Supreme Court declares American Indians to be "dependent aliens".
 :nono:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 04, 2014, 11:43:25 AM
Rogers Day
The birthday of Will Rogers, America's "cowboy philosopher," is observed in Oklahoma, where he was born on November 4, 1879. After his first appearance as a vaudeville entertainer in 1905 at Madison Square Garden, he developed a widespread reputation as a humorist. He went on to become a writer, a radio performer, and a motion-picture star. His birthday was first observed in 1947, with a celebration at the Will Rogers Memorial near the town of Claremore. Beneath the statue of Rogers at the memorial is the statement for which he is best remembered: "I never met a man I didn't like."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on November 04, 2014, 02:22:42 PM
2008 - Barack Obama becomes the first African-American to be elected President of the United States
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on November 04, 2014, 08:17:36 PM
1921 - The Sturmabteilung (SA) is founded by a guy who flunked out of art college.

Also Walter Cronkite (1916) and Markie Post (1950) were born.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 05, 2014, 01:22:02 PM
1983, Topper Headon of The Clash was arrested for walking his dog while drunk on London's Fulham Road.
Slow news day...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on November 05, 2014, 03:12:06 PM
Drunken dogs are nothing to take lightly.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 06, 2014, 05:34:35 AM
Nov. 6, 1917
After three months of horrific fighting, the Third Battle of Ypres finally ends when Canadian forces take the village of Passchendaele in Belgium.

In one of the bloodiest battles of World War I, a combination of over-ambitious aims, terrible weather conditions, and misguided persistence by British Field Marshal Douglas Haig led to nearly 250,000 total casualties suffered by both sides. At the time Allied forces were scheduled to begin the long-planned offensive, Allied artillery and unusually heavy rains had turned the battlefield into a sea of mud. Soldiers fought in the mud, slept in the mud, and some men drowned in the mud when they slipped into water-filled shell craters. When the offensive was finally called off, after the Canadian victory at Passchendaele, the total Allied advance amounted to only five miles.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on November 09, 2014, 02:04:13 AM
25 years ago today - the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Sent from here using smoke and mirrors

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 09, 2014, 07:19:37 AM
25 years ago the Berlin wall came down.

Snowdog beat me to it. I guess that i should have looked before posting. Damn rookie mistake.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on November 09, 2014, 08:25:28 AM
It was a bit of a big one, so two reminders seem fine.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on November 09, 2014, 09:01:40 AM
Is that a Pink Floyd thing?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 09, 2014, 04:19:56 PM
Tom Fogerty (Creedence Clearwater Revival) was born today, 1941.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on November 09, 2014, 04:25:51 PM
Tom Fogerty (Creedence Clearwater Revival) was born today, 1941.

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 :hail:

Oh wait. You're not talking about John. Nevermind.

 :nuts:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on November 09, 2014, 08:26:40 PM
Is that a Pink Floyd thing?

That was kind of the opposite.  They were putting bricks in the wall.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 10, 2014, 06:21:17 AM
November 10, 1960 - Gregg Allman received a guitar for his 13th birthday.
The rest is history...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mr.awesome on November 10, 2014, 07:09:26 AM
The bell will ring out 29 times today.  :(

http://youtu.be/9vST6hVRj2A (http://youtu.be/9vST6hVRj2A)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 10, 2014, 08:16:28 AM
Today's birthday.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: PatM on November 10, 2014, 08:27:26 AM
1969 -  The PBS children's program Sesame Street debuts.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 10, 2014, 08:29:24 AM

1989 - German citizens begin tearing down the Berlin Wall.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 11, 2014, 08:50:33 AM
It is Veterans Day in the USA.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: PatM on November 11, 2014, 08:55:11 AM
Remembrance day - end of WWI hostilities in Europe

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stevent on November 11, 2014, 09:33:28 AM
11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month ..........


 :'(
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on November 11, 2014, 02:06:14 PM
11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month ..........


 :'(

I lost family in both wars. I find today a sad day.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: giaka on November 11, 2014, 03:56:04 PM
Christa Brittany Allen was born in the town where I presently live.   :)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stevent on November 12, 2014, 12:26:46 AM
11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month ..........


 :'(

I lost family in both wars. I find today a sad day.


Ditto, my family has a tradition of service as far back as we can remember, either RN or Army, my dad was with the REME's, i joined the USN, two of my Welsh cousins were RN. It's an honor and privilidge to serve your country, adopted or not.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 12, 2014, 08:38:00 AM
 1968-The U.S. Supreme Court voids an Arkansas law banning the teaching of evolution in public schools.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on November 12, 2014, 02:00:13 PM
1980 - Voyager 1 flew past Saturn
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 12, 2014, 05:49:22 PM
Today is history.
Well done, Rosetta!
http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/12/world/comet-landing-countdown/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/12/world/comet-landing-countdown/index.html)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 16, 2014, 08:57:57 AM
The Sound of Music Opens on Broadway (1959)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on November 16, 2014, 11:48:43 AM
Birthday of Burgess Meredith

WWII Army Air Corp/Force Capt., B-26 rear gunner to 'Of Mice and Men', the Penguin on 'Batman' and Rocky's trainer among a very vast array of roles.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on November 16, 2014, 11:49:47 AM
Today is history.
Well done, Rosetta!
[url]http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/12/world/comet-landing-countdown/index.html[/url] ([url]http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/12/world/comet-landing-countdown/index.html[/url])


We watched it live in class via ESA webcast.  It was pretty cool.   :thumbsup:

Today:

On November 16, 1532, Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish explorer and conquistador, springs a trap on the Incan emperor, Atahualpa. With fewer than 200 men against several thousand, Pizarro lures Atahualpa to a feast in the emperor's honor and then opens fire on the unarmed Incans. Pizarro's men massacre the Incans and capture Atahualpa, forcing him to convert to Christianity before eventually killing him.
 :facepalm:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on November 16, 2014, 01:11:38 PM
In 1904 the vacuum tube was invented.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 16, 2014, 04:01:43 PM
November 16, 1798
British seamen board the U.S. frigate Baltimore and impress a number of crewmen as alleged deserters, a practice that contributed to the War of 1812.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 17, 2014, 06:29:28 AM
Nov. 17, 1963
John Weightman the Headmaster of a Surrey Grammar School, banned all pupils from having Beatle haircuts saying, "this ridiculous style brings out the worst in boys physically. It makes them look like morons."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: MrsCablebandit on November 17, 2014, 07:18:23 AM
November 17, 2001 - Oscar Clark was born.

It's historically significant at Casa de Cablebandit, if nothing else!  ;D

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on November 17, 2014, 08:14:23 AM
Nov. 17, 1963
John Weightman the Headmaster of a Surrey Grammar School, banned all pupils from having Beatle haircuts saying, "this ridiculous style brings out the worst in boys physically. It makes them look like morons."

 :rolf:  That's awesome. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 18, 2014, 05:38:10 AM
11/18/1883
At exactly noon on this day, American and Canadian railroads begin using four continental time zones to end the confusion of dealing with thousands of local times. The bold move was emblematic of the power shared by the railroad companies.

The need for continental time zones stemmed directly from the problems of moving passengers and freight over the thousands of miles of rail line that covered North America by the 1880s. Since human beings had first begun keeping track of time, they set their clocks to the local movement of the sun. Even as late as the 1880s, most towns in the U.S. had their own local time, generally based on "high noon," or the time when the sun was at its highest point in the sky. As railroads began to shrink the travel time between cities from days or months to mere hours, however, these local times became a scheduling nightmare. Railroad timetables in major cities listed dozens of different arrival and departure times for the same train, each linked to a different local time zone.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 18, 2014, 06:45:36 AM

1978- Peoples Temple cult leader Jim Jones leads his followers to a mass murder-suicide in Jonestown, Guyana, hours after cult member killed Congressman Leo J. Ryan of California.  :crazy:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on November 18, 2014, 08:40:40 AM
Steamboat Willie is released in 1928.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 19, 2014, 01:17:35 PM
Honest Abe makes a delivery to some address in Gettysburg back in 1863.

I thought him being the Pres that he would have farmed that out to a lackie.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 19, 2014, 03:23:15 PM
19 November 1916: Ruth Bancroft Law (Mrs. Charles Oliver) flew a Curtiss Pusher non-stop from Chicago, Illinois to Hornell, New York, a distance of 590 miles (949.5 kilometers). This exceeded the previous long distance flight record of 452 miles (727.4 kilometers) and set a new Aero Club of America record for distance.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on November 19, 2014, 06:32:28 PM
19 November 1916: Ruth Bancroft Law (Mrs. Charles Oliver) flew a Curtiss Pusher non-stop from Chicago, Illinois to Hornell, New York, a distance of 590 miles (949.5 kilometers). This exceeded the previous long distance flight record of 452 miles (727.4 kilometers) and set a new Aero Club of America record for distance.
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 :hail:


http://youtu.be/oHrxxyBPaY4 (http://youtu.be/oHrxxyBPaY4)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 20, 2014, 06:38:55 AM
Nov.20, 1974
Drummer with The Who, Keith Moon collapsed during a concert after his drink was spiked with horse tranquilizer. 19 year-old Scott Halpin who was in the audience, volunteered to replace him on drums for the remaining three numbers.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 20, 2014, 06:50:26 AM
1903- In Cheyenne, Wyoming, 42-year-old hired gunman Tom Horn is hanged for the murder of 14-year-old Willie Nickell.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on November 20, 2014, 06:55:32 AM
Nov.20, 1974
Drummer with The Who, Keith Moon collapsed during a concert after his drink was spiked with horse tranquilizer. 19 year-old Scott Halpin who was in the audience, volunteered to replace him on drums for the remaining three numbers.
Huh.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Vulcanbill on November 20, 2014, 07:40:52 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPiG7HVt5lM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPiG7HVt5lM)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on November 20, 2014, 03:20:10 PM
The Nuremberg War Crimes trials opened up in 1945.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 22, 2014, 07:14:23 AM
Todays birthday  Rodney Dangerfield (1921)

And JFK got himself killed.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 22, 2014, 07:25:38 AM

1542 -  New laws are passed in Spain giving Indians in America protection against enslavement.  That went well. :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: doc4216 on November 22, 2014, 11:59:34 AM
1906-At the second International Radio Telegraphic Convention, which was held in Berlin, the attendees agreed to adopt the wireless signal "SOS" as the internationally recognized signal for distress at sea.  Their thinking was that three dots, three dashes and three dots could not be misinterpreted.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 23, 2014, 06:31:48 AM
Nov. 23, 1956
Sheet metal worker Louis Balint was arrested after punching Elvis Presley at a Hotel in Toledo. Balint claimed that his wife's love for Elvis had caused his marriage to break up. He was fined $19.60 but ended up being jailed because he was unable to pay the fine.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: doc4216 on November 23, 2014, 10:11:19 AM
1942-The Coast Guard Women's Reserve, known as SPARs, was organized.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on November 23, 2014, 11:29:26 AM
1942-The Coast Guard Women's Reserve, known as SPARs, was organized.

That definitely deserves a big Happy Birthday!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on November 23, 2014, 12:06:14 PM
1942-The Coast Guard Women's Reserve, known as SPARs, was organized.

Paving the way for you know who.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on November 23, 2014, 12:33:28 PM
1942-The Coast Guard Women's Reserve, known as SPARs, was organized.

That definitely deserves a big Happy Birthday!
+1
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 24, 2014, 06:47:32 AM
Nov. 23, 1991
Freddie Mercury died of complications from aids at his home in London's Holland park aged 45, just one day after he publicly admitted he was HIV positive. Mercury was openly bisexual and enjoyed a colourful rock star lifestyle.
Bolded to indicate "understatement".
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 24, 2014, 09:02:12 AM
1963- Jack Ruby fatally shoots the accused assassin of President Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald, in the garage of the Dallas Police Department.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on November 24, 2014, 02:27:25 PM
Sounds like a conspiracy to me.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on November 24, 2014, 02:33:13 PM
Something about a grassy troll.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 24, 2014, 03:04:28 PM
The hairy mound.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 24, 2014, 04:49:05 PM
The schoolbook suppository?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on November 24, 2014, 06:58:31 PM
The king is dead. All hail the king.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 25, 2014, 07:24:37 AM
 1955- The Interstate Commerce Commission bans segregation in interstate travel.  :headscratch:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jim on November 25, 2014, 10:25:11 AM
Bus service / Greyhound
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 26, 2014, 06:29:06 AM
Nov. 26, 1968
United States Air Force helicopter pilot James P. Fleming rescues an Army Special Forces unit pinned down by Viet Cong fire and is later awarded the Medal of Honor.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 26, 2014, 07:24:03 AM
1863   The first National Thanksgiving is celebrated.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: doc4216 on November 26, 2014, 10:00:39 AM
2002-President George W. Bush signed into law a bill that created the Department of Homeland Security, the largest reorganization of the federal government in fifty years.  The Coast Guard was one of a number of agencies that transferred to the new Department; the transfer was scheduled to go into effect on 1 March 2003.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 27, 2014, 07:36:08 AM
1868   Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer's 7th Cavalry kills Chief Black Kettle and about 100 Cheyenne (mostly women and children) on the Washita River. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on November 27, 2014, 08:42:17 AM
This ones for you Clay.

Bill Nye the science guy was born in 1955.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Nye (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Nye)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on November 27, 2014, 10:52:29 AM
Here are a couple more birthdays.

1917 - "Buffalo" Bob Smith, Buffalo NY, TV host (Howdy Doody)
1940 - Bruce Lee, [Lee Yuen Kam], San Francisco California, karate star/actor (Green Hornet)
1942 - Jimi Hendrix, Seattle Wash, rock guitarist (Purple Haze), (d. 1970)
1948 - Dave Winthrop, rock saxophonist (Supertramp)
1976 - Jaleel White, Los Angeles California, actor (Steve Urkel-Family Matters)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on November 27, 2014, 11:00:39 AM
1095 - Pope Urban II preaches 1st Crusade
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on November 27, 2014, 12:57:16 PM
2005   First partial human face transplant completed Amiens, France.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on November 29, 2014, 06:34:26 AM
1760   Major Roger Rogers takes possession of Detroit on behalf of Britain.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on November 29, 2014, 06:36:42 AM
Today or yesterday, I can't quite remember, the signing of the Magna Carta, which became a foundation for later democratic rights charters across the world.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 29, 2014, 06:53:50 AM
Denver, CO. declares today "Rolling Stones Day" 1965.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on November 29, 2014, 09:08:10 AM
This ones for you Clay.

Bill Nye the science guy was born in 1955.

[url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Nye[/url] ([url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Nye[/url])


Love me some Bill Nye!  I actually use clips in my class from time to time.


Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on November 29, 2014, 09:09:51 AM
1760   Major Roger Rogers takes possession of Detroit on behalf of Britain.

I'm in Detroit right now.  Can he do that again?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on November 30, 2014, 06:01:28 AM
Nov.30, 2003
A block of East 2nd Street in New York City was officially renamed Joey Ramone Place. It is the block where Joey once lived with band mate Dee Dee Ramone, and is near the music club CBGB, where the Ramones played their first gigs. In 2010, it was reported that "Joey Ramone Place," was New York City's most stolen sign. As of September 27, the sign has been moved to 20 feet above ground level.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on December 01, 2014, 05:54:05 AM
59 years ago today Rosa Parks sat down on a bus.

Sent from here using smoke and mirrors

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on December 01, 2014, 06:01:47 AM
1957 - Sam Cooke and Buddy Holly and Crickets debut on Ed Sullivan Show
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 01, 2014, 07:18:03 AM
1881   Virgil, Wyatt and Morgan Earp are exonerated in court for their action in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Ariz.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 01, 2014, 03:56:27 PM
Dec. 1, 1783
J. A. C. Charles and another man make the first trip in a hydrogen balloon, flying 27 miles from Paris to Nesle, France. After landing, Charles goes up again by himself, achieving the first solo balloon flight.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: xsrider on December 01, 2014, 04:52:15 PM
Dec. 1, 1913, Henry Ford introduced the first moving assembly line for the mass production of an entire automobile. His innovation reduced the time it took to build a car from more than 12 hours to two hours and 30 minutes.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 02, 2014, 05:27:46 AM
Dec. 2, 1973 - The Who and some companions were jailed overnight for $6,000 worth of destruction they imposed on a hotel room after a show.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 03, 2014, 07:29:50 AM
1979   Eleven are dead and eight injured in a mad rush to see a rock band (The Who) at a concert in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 03, 2014, 09:46:11 AM
Dec. 3, 1938
German government revoked driver's licenses held by Jews.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on December 03, 2014, 12:31:02 PM
Paul Harvey begins his radio show in 1950.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 04, 2014, 05:36:03 AM
Dec. 4, 1956
The "Million Dollar Quartet" begin to record at Sun.
Quote
The modest storefront recording studio at 760 Union Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee, played an outsize role in rock-and-roll history. And of the many historic moments that occurred there, none is more famous than the impromptu jam session by four young rock-and-roll giants that took place on this day in 1956—a session enshrined in rock-and-roll legend as the one-and-only gathering of the "Million Dollar Quartet."

The studio at 760 Union was run by Sam Phillips, the legendary producer whose Sun Records had launched Elvis Presley on his path toward stardom two years earlier with the release of his first single, "It's Alright Mama" (1954). Phillips' decision to sell Presley's contract to RCA Victor in 1955 for only $35,000 is easy to question in retrospect, but it provided Sun Records with the operating capital it needed in order to record and promote the parade of future stars who had descended on Memphis hoping to follow in Elvis' footsteps.

Among those stars was Carl Perkins, the rockabilly legend who was in the studio on December 4, 1956, to record a follow-up to his smash hit from earlier that year: "Blue Suede Shoes." Hanging out in the booth was Perkins' good friend Johnny Cash, already a star in his own right after his breakthrough hits, "Folsom Prison Blues" (1955) and "I Walk The Line" (1956). And playing piano for a $15 session fee was the brash, wild, but not-yet-famous Jerry Lee Lewis, whose career-making Sun single "Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On" was set for release just a few weeks later. Four songs into Perkins' session, all work came to an end with the arrival of an unexpected drop-in guest: Elvis Presley himself.

While recording engineer Jack Clement ran a tape that would not be discovered for more than 20 years, Sam Phillips—ever the promoter—had the presence of mind to summon a photographer from the local paper to capture images of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins gathered around a piano singing the kind of music they'd all grown up on: gospel. The caption under the photo that ran in the next day's Memphis Press-Scimitar was "Million Dollar Quartet." The label quickly caught on among rock-and-roll fans who would not actually get the chance to hear the recording made on this day in 1956 until 1981, when the first portions of the lost tapes were discovered and released.


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on December 04, 2014, 05:37:47 AM
1957: Elvis Presley reports for his pre-induction Army physical in Memphis.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 04, 2014, 07:18:35 AM
1872   The U.S. brigantine Marie Celeste is found adrift and deserted with its cargo intact, in the Atlantic Ocean between the Azores and Portugal.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Stickman on December 04, 2014, 08:22:12 AM
1872   The U.S. brigantine Marie Celeste is found adrift and deserted with its cargo intact, in the Atlantic Ocean between the Azores and Portugal.

On this day in 1872, The Dei Gratia, a small British brig under Captain David Morehouse, spots the Mary Celeste, an American vessel, sailing erratically but at full sail near the Azores Islands in the Atlantic Ocean. The ship was seaworthy, its stores and supplies were untouched, but not a soul was onboard. On November 7, the brigantine Mary Celeste sailed from New York harbor for Genoa, Italy, carrying Captain Benjamin S. Briggs, his wife and two-year-old daughter, a crew of eight, and a cargo of some 1,700 barrels of crude alcohol. After the Dei Gratia sighted the vessel, Captain Morehouse and his men boarded the ship to find it abandoned, with its sails slightly damaged, several feet of water in the hold, and the lifeboat and navigational instruments missing. However, the ship was in good order, the cargo intact, and reserves of food and water remained on board. The last entry in the captain's log shows that the Mary Celeste had been nine days and 500 miles away from where the ship was found by the Dei Gratia. Apparently, the Mary Celeste had been drifting toward Genoa on her intended course for 11 days with no one at the wheel to guide her. Captain Briggs, his family, and the crew of the vessel were never found, and the reason for the abandonment of the Mary Celeste has never been determined.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on December 04, 2014, 09:38:42 AM
One guy thinks he knows what happened;
Sea Captain solves Mary Celeste mystery   www.deafwhale.com/maryceleste/ (http://www.deafwhale.com/maryceleste/)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on December 04, 2014, 03:47:06 PM
One guy thinks he knows what happened;
Sea Captain solves Mary Celeste mystery   [url=http://www.deafwhale.com/maryceleste/]www.deafwhale.com/maryceleste/[/url] ([url]http://www.deafwhale.com/maryceleste/[/url])


Interesting read- thanks for posting!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 05, 2014, 05:33:43 AM
Dec. 5, 1933
The 21st Amendment ends Prohibition in the United States, which had begun 13 years earlier.
:beerchug:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 05, 2014, 07:30:24 AM
Dec. 5, 1933
The 21st Amendment ends Prohibition in the United States, which had begun 13 years earlier.
:beerchug:

I will have to tilt a beer to this one and send it to my friends.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 05, 2014, 08:59:57 AM
Orion has been launched today!!!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: giaka on December 05, 2014, 12:07:30 PM
32 years ago I got married for the first time.  :rolf:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on December 05, 2014, 02:13:53 PM
1904   The Japanese destroy the Russian Baltic fleet (yes, they sailed round the world just to get sunk) at Port Arthur in Korea
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 06, 2014, 06:00:23 AM
Dec. 6, 1917
Quote
On this day in 1917, a Belgian steamer and French freighter, both loaded with ammunition, explode in Canada's Halifax Harbor, leveling part of the town and killing nearly 1,600 people and injuring approximately 8,000. The 8 million tons of TNT carried by the ships was intended for use in World War I.

The ships were gathered in Halifax, the meeting point for convoys to begin the dangerous Atlantic crossing, during which they were threatened by the deadly and stealthy German U-boat submarines. The HMS High Flyer was assigned to lead the convoy. The freighter from France, the Mont Blanc, had picked up a full load of TNT in New York and came into the harbor on a foggy morning. Due to the poor conditions, it collided with the Imo, a Belgian steam boat, also carrying ammunition. A fire resulted and both ships were abandoned immediately.

A British ship, the Pictou, was at a pier in the harbor and was also filled with ammunition. The crew of the Pictou immediately fled and set the ship free upon witnessing the collision. The High Flyer was the only ship that took any action to try to stop the disaster--it sent 23 men toward the collision to attempt to sink the vessels. They were too late: A massive explosion occurred just as they reached the ships.

The explosion sent burning debris throughout Halifax. It also caused a large wave to form that pushed the ships at pier right up out of the harbor. A Canadian army officer stationed at Halifax described the result, "All that could be seen for a great circumference were burning buildings, great mounds of iron and brick in the streets and dead bodies." A 2.5- mile radius was completely demolished and the explosion could be felt 125 miles away. The wave of water hit a Navy ammunition plant located near the shores, possibly saving it from the fire.

Most other places nearby were not so lucky: The railway station collapsed from the blast and crushed scores of people inside. About 100 more were killed in a sugar plant located near the water. Of the 500 students located in schools nearby, less than 10 survived. In all, the death toll was somewhere between 1,200 and 4,000, but no one knows for sure because so much of the city was completely obliterated. Many more might have died except for a snowstorm later that day that helped put out the flames. Still, 25,000 people were left homeless in the wake of the disaster.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 06, 2014, 08:03:54 AM
1862   President Abraham Lincoln orders the hanging of 39 of the 303 convicted Indians who participated in the Sioux Uprising in Minnesota. They are to be hanged on December 26.
 :eek: I never read anything about Lincoln remotely like that.

After further review, like most things, it's complicated.
http://www.historynet.com/abraham-lincoln-deciding-the-fate-of-300-indians-convicted-of-war-crimes-in-minnesotas-great-sioux-uprising.htm (http://www.historynet.com/abraham-lincoln-deciding-the-fate-of-300-indians-convicted-of-war-crimes-in-minnesotas-great-sioux-uprising.htm)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 06, 2014, 05:36:42 PM
After further review, like most things, it's complicated.
Good sig. line.
 :beerchug:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on December 07, 2014, 03:14:32 AM
1862   President Abraham Lincoln orders the hanging of 39 of the 303 convicted Indians who participated in the Sioux Uprising in Minnesota. They are to be hanged on December 26.
 :eek: I never read anything about Lincoln remotely like that.

After further review, like most things, it's complicated.
[url]http://www.historynet.com/abraham-lincoln-deciding-the-fate-of-300-indians-convicted-of-war-crimes-in-minnesotas-great-sioux-uprising.htm[/url] ([url]http://www.historynet.com/abraham-lincoln-deciding-the-fate-of-300-indians-convicted-of-war-crimes-in-minnesotas-great-sioux-uprising.htm[/url])


this bit sums it up:

Bishop Henry Whipple, head of the Minnesota Episcopal Church, spoke often of the hypocrisy of federal Indian policies. In a newspaper editorial he wrote, "f . . . vengeance is to be more than a savage thirst for blood, we must examine the causes which have brought this bloodshed . . . . Who is guilty of the causes which desolated our border? At whose door is the blood of these innocent victims? I believe that God will hold the Nation guilty." Whipple was a cousin to Henry Halleck, Lincoln's general-in-chief, so the bishop gained an audience with the president in November and urged clemency. Lincoln was impressed. "He came here the other day," Lincoln said later, "and talked with me about the rascality of this Indian business, until I felt it down to my boots. - See more at: http://www.historynet.com/abraham-lincoln-deciding-the-fate-of-300-indians-convicted-of-war-crimes-in-minnesotas-great-sioux-uprising.htm#sthash.0MLgmAFg.dpuf (http://www.historynet.com/abraham-lincoln-deciding-the-fate-of-300-indians-convicted-of-war-crimes-in-minnesotas-great-sioux-uprising.htm#sthash.0MLgmAFg.dpuf)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on December 07, 2014, 03:51:42 AM
On Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese warplanes attacked the home base of the U.S. Pacific fleet at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, drawing the United States into World War II. More than 2,300 Americans were killed.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 07, 2014, 05:11:25 AM
1972   The crew of Apollo 17, the last manned mission to the moon, lifts off at Cape Canaveral, Florida.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 07, 2014, 06:03:22 AM
Dec. 7, 1963
The "Singing Nun" Sister Luc-Gabrielle (nee Jeanne-Paule Marie Deckers) reached #1 in America on the pop charts with "Dominique", a song praising St. Dominic, in French!!
It would remain #1 for four weeks, preventing "Louie Louie" from ever doing the same.
Deckers' career and life ended tragically in 1985, when she committed suicide in the face of a massive tax bill from the Belgian government relating to unpaid taxes on royalties that Deckers had donated in full to the Roman Catholic Church.
I can still remember the words to this day in French.
 :shrug:

http://youtu.be/hkJNWp9OoUI (http://youtu.be/hkJNWp9OoUI)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 07, 2014, 06:54:43 AM
Dec. 7, 1963
The "Singing Nun" Sister Luc-Gabrielle (nee Jeanne-Paule Marie Deckers) reached #1 in America on the pop charts with "Dominique", a song praising St. Dominic, in French!!
It would remain #1 for four weeks, preventing "Louie Louie" from ever doing the same.
Deckers' career and life ended tragically in 1985, when she committed suicide in the face of a massive tax bill from the Belgian government relating to unpaid taxes on royalties that Deckers had donated in full to the Roman Catholic Church.
I can still remember the words to this day in French.
 :shrug:

Very sad. I don't remember the song very well, but I do remember it being played a lot on the radio.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 08, 2014, 06:34:05 AM
RIP John
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on December 08, 2014, 09:15:51 PM
On Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese warplanes attacked the home base of the U.S. Pacific fleet at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, drawing the United States into World War II. More than 2,300 Americans were killed.

I thought it was the Germans.

Anyway, in a few days, 12/11/41 to be exact, Herr Hitler declared war on the US.  If on this Thursday you get a sense of deja vu remember you read it here first.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 09, 2014, 01:57:17 AM
Kecksburg UFO Incident (1965)
Many believe that the large fireball observed in the sky above Ontario, Canada, and at least six US states in 1965 was nothing more than a passing meteor. However, some witnesses in the small town of Kecksburg, Pennsylvania, claim a car-sized, acorn-shaped object with hieroglyphic-like markings crashed in a nearby wood and was then carted off by the military. Government officials long denied these allegations, but 40 years later, in 2005, NASA made what admission regarding the suspicious object?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Kecksburg+UFO+incident (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Kecksburg+UFO+incident)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on December 09, 2014, 03:20:18 AM
Government officials long denied these allegations, but 40 years later, in 2005, NASA made what admission regarding the suspicious object?


that the moon really is made of cheese?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on December 09, 2014, 06:02:56 AM
Dec 9, 1972:
"I Am Woman" by Helen Reddy tops the U.S. pop charts
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 09, 2014, 05:08:18 PM
1st Young Men's Christian Association in North America opens. (Montreal)
 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on December 09, 2014, 05:38:10 PM
Ralph Baer, inventor of the gaming console, dies at 92

http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/08/tech/gaming-gadgets/ralph-baer-obit/index.html (http://www.cnn.com/2014/12/08/tech/gaming-gadgets/ralph-baer-obit/index.html)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 10, 2014, 05:45:15 AM
Dec. 10, 1967
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When he left his final recording session in Memphis, Otis Redding intended to return soon to the song he'd been working on—he still had to replace a whistled verse thrown in as a placeholder with additional lyrics that he'd yet to write. In the meantime, however, there was a television appearance to make in Cleveland, followed by a concert in Madison, Wisconsin. On its final approach to Madison on this day in 1967, however, the private plane carrying soul-music legend Otis Redding would crash into the frigid waters of a small lake three miles short of the runway, killing seven of the eight men aboard, including Redding. "Sittin' On The Dock Of The Bay" would be released in its "unfinished" form several weeks later, with Redding's whistled verse a seemingly indispensable part of the now-classic record. It would soon become history's first posthumous #1 hit and the biggest pop hit of Redding's career.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on December 10, 2014, 06:27:17 AM
Dec. 10, 1967
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When he left his final recording session in Memphis, Otis Redding intended to return soon to the song he'd been working on—he still had to replace a whistled verse thrown in as a placeholder with additional lyrics that he'd yet to write. In the meantime, however, there was a television appearance to make in Cleveland, followed by a concert in Madison, Wisconsin. On its final approach to Madison on this day in 1967, however, the private plane carrying soul-music legend Otis Redding would crash into the frigid waters of a small lake three miles short of the runway, killing seven of the eight men aboard, including Redding. "Sittin' On The Dock Of The Bay" would be released in its "unfinished" form several weeks later, with Redding's whistled verse a seemingly indispensable part of the now-classic record. It would soon become history's first posthumous #1 hit and the biggest pop hit of Redding's career.



:clap:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 10, 2014, 07:38:35 AM
1869   Governor John Campbell signs the bill that grants women in Wyoming Territory the right to vote as well as hold public office.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 10, 2014, 08:35:29 AM
First Nobel Prizes Awarded (1901)
The Nobel Prizes, named after Swedish chemist Alfred Nobel, are awarded annually to those who have made outstanding contributions to the fields of physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, peace, and—since 1969—economic sciences. Nobel is said to have been inspired to create the prizes after reading his own prematurely published obituary, which condemned his invention of dynamite and referred to him as "the merchant of death." What family has amassed the most Nobel Prizes?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Nobel+Prize (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Nobel+Prize)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 11, 2014, 06:43:27 AM
1936   Britain's King Edward VIII abdicates the throne to marry American Wallis Warfield Simpson.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 11, 2014, 12:04:34 PM
Dec. 11, 1968
Filming began for The Rolling Stones 'Rock & Roll Circus.' As well as clowns and acrobats, John Lennon and his fiancee Yoko Ono performed as part of a supergroup called The Dirty Mac, along with Eric Clapton, Mitch Mitchell, and Keith Richards. It was originally meant to be aired on the BBC, but the Rolling Stones withheld it because they were unhappy with their performance. The film was eventually released in 1996.
http://youtu.be/LzwRgKpmbgQ (http://youtu.be/LzwRgKpmbgQ)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 12, 2014, 11:29:49 AM
Dec. 12, 1901
Italian physicist and radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi succeeds in sending the first radio transmission across the Atlantic Ocean, disproving detractors who told him that the curvature of the earth would limit transmission to 200 miles or less. The message--simply the Morse-code signal for the letter "s"--traveled more than 2,000 miles from Poldhu in Cornwall, England, to Newfoundland, Canada.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 13, 2014, 05:59:21 AM
December 13, 1951,
Maj George Davis of the 334th Fighter Interceptor Squadron shoots down four MiG-15 s in a single day.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 14, 2014, 11:58:41 AM
Max Planck's Quantum Theory Is Born (1900)
Considered the inventor of quantum theory, Max Planck shocked the science world by showing that atoms emit or absorb energy in bundles, or quanta, not in a continuous stream as taught by Newtonian physics. This insight, along with subsequent developments by Einstein, Bohr, and others, established the revolutionary quantum theory of modern physics and earned Planck the 1918 Nobel Prize in Physics. In 1945, Planck's son was executed following a failed attempt to assassinate what political figure?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Max+Planck (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Max+Planck)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 15, 2014, 05:38:26 AM
Dec. 15, 2006
The co-founder of Atlantic Records Ahmet Ertegun died, aged 83. Ertegun who founded Atlantic Records with Herb Abramson in 1947 helped make Ray Charles and Aretha Franklin stars and signed the Rolling Stones and Led Zeppelin in the early 70s. He suffered a head injury when he fell at a Rolling Stones concert at New York's Beacon Theatre in October, and died after slipping into a coma.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 16, 2014, 01:17:07 PM
Battle of the Bulge Begins (1944)
This major German counter-offensive on the Western Front during World War II was the largest and bloodiest battle fought by the US Army during the war. Taking advantage of foggy weather, German forces attacked the thinly held American front in the Belgian Ardennes sector, catching the Allied forces unprepared. The Germans penetrated deep into the Allied lines. However, an American force held out at Bastogne, and the arrival of reinforcements turned the tide. How did the battle get its name?

I don't think it has anything to do with fat men.

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Battle+of+the+Bulge (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Battle+of+the+Bulge)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 16, 2014, 02:41:40 PM
Dec. 16, 1835
The Great NY Fire of 1835 began on the evening in a five-story warehouse at 25 Merchant Street (now called Beaver Street) at the intersection with Pearl Street between Hanover Square, Manhattan and Wall Street in the snow-covered city and was fed by gale-force winds blowing from the northwest towards the East River. With temperatures as low as −17 °F (−27 °C) and the East River frozen solid, firefighters had to cut holes in the ice to get water. Water then froze in the hoses and pumps. Attempts to blow up buildings in its path (a technique later regarded as counterproductive) were thwarted by a lack of gunpowder in Manhattan (probably NOT the case today - Ed.). Firefighters coming to help from Philadelphia said they could see signs of the fire there.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 16, 2014, 06:15:28 PM
Near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Orville and Wilbur Wright make the first successful flight in history of a self-propelled, heavier-than-air aircraft.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 17, 2014, 05:00:46 AM
The Simpsons Debuts (1989)
One of the most popular animated TV shows in US history, The Simpsons has earned its spot in pop culture history through its parodies of the "Middle American" lifestyle. The show, created by Matt Groening, is a spin-off of a series of animated shorts originally aired on The Tracey Ullman Show and is currently both the longest-running American sitcom and the longest-running American animated program.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on December 17, 2014, 09:50:46 AM
Near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Orville and Wilbur Wright make the first successful flight in history of a self-propelled, heavier-than-air aircraft.

I was able to see the actual wright flyer at the smithsonian this past spring.
It was amazing.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 17, 2014, 03:36:36 PM
Dec. 17, 1939
Canada signs British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, a $1.281 billion program to train pilots, navigators, wireless operators and gunners from UK, Canada, Australia and NZ; instructors from the Royal Canadian Air Force working at 107 schools and 184 ancillary units across Canada will eventually train 130,000 Allied aircrew.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 18, 2014, 06:19:18 AM
1865   Slavery is abolished in the United States. The 13th Amendment is formally adopted into the U.S. Constitution, ensuring that "neither slavery nor involuntary servitude… shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on December 18, 2014, 12:39:52 PM
Today in 1856,  J J Thomson, discoverer of the electron, inventor of the mass spectrometer, and winner of the 1906 Nobel Prize, was born.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 18, 2014, 08:47:35 PM
Dec. 18, 1941

A week of air raids over Hong Kong, a British crown colony, was followed up on December 17 with a visit paid by Japanese envoys to Sir Mark Young, the British governor of Hong Kong. The envoys' message was simple: The British garrison there should simply surrender to the Japanese—resistance was futile. The envoys were sent home with the following retort: "The governor and commander in chief of Hong Kong declines absolutely to enter into negotiations for the surrender of Hong Kong..."

The first wave of Japanese troops landed in Hong Kong with artillery fire for cover and the following order from their commander: "Take no prisoners." Upon overrunning a volunteer antiaircraft battery, the Japanese invaders roped together the captured soldiers and proceeded to bayonet them to death. Even those who offered no resistance, such as the Royal Medical Corps, were led up a hill and killed.

The Japanese quickly took control of key reservoirs, threatening the British and Chinese inhabitants with a slow death by thirst. The Brits finally surrendered control of Hong Kong on Christmas Day.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 20, 2014, 05:09:14 AM
Dec. 20, 1941
The Flying Tigers, American pilots in China, enter combat against the Japanese over Kunming.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 20, 2014, 06:16:46 AM
1933   The German government announces 400,000 citizens are to be sterilized because of hereditary defects.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 20, 2014, 07:15:03 AM
The Louisiana Purchase (1803)
Early American settlers in the western territories depended on the Mississippi River's port of New Orleans for commerce. When Spain retroceded New Orleans to France in 1800, Americans feared their access to the river would be blocked, so President Thomas Jefferson sent negotiators to broker a deal for the port city. Why did Napoleon ultimately sell the entire Louisiana territory, including New Orleans, to the US for only about 4 cents per acre, or a sum total of $15 million?


And born today.

Samuel Mudd (1833)
Mudd was the physician who set the broken leg of John Wilkes Booth, Abraham Lincoln's assassin, just hours after Booth fled the crime scene. A Confederate sympathizer, Mudd was accused of aiding Booth's escape and tried along with Booth's other accomplices. Throughout, Mudd maintained that he had not recognized the disguised Booth, an acquaintance of his, and had been unaware of the assassination, but he was nonetheless convicted and sentenced to life imprisonment. Why was he pardoned in 1869?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on December 21, 2014, 06:53:57 AM
Why did Napoleon ultimately sell the entire Louisiana territory, including New Orleans, to the US for only about 4 cents per acre, or a sum total of $15 million?



Probably to bribe the US. France was fighting the rest of Europe at the time.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 21, 2014, 07:13:29 AM
Dec. 20, 1941
The Flying Tigers, American pilots in China, enter combat against the Japanese over Kunming.
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One of those flew past where I live, a couple of times, last week. What a great sound. :inlove:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 21, 2014, 07:16:51 AM
1620   The Pilgrims land at or near Plymouth Rock.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 21, 2014, 07:22:13 AM
Dec. 21, 1940
Born on this day, Frank Zappa, multi' instrumentalist, producer and composer. Recorded with The Mothers Of Invention and solo, 1969 album 'Hot Rats', 1974 album 'Apostrophe', featuring 'Don't Eat The Yellow Snow'. First band was The Blackouts, recorded one of the first concept albums 'Freak Out'. Zappa died of prostate cancer on 4th December 1993.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on December 21, 2014, 09:11:05 AM
Dec. 21, 1940
Born on this day, Frank Zappa, multi' instrumentalist, producer and composer. Recorded with The Mothers Of Invention and solo, 1969 album 'Hot Rats', 1974 album 'Apostrophe', featuring 'Don't Eat The Yellow Snow'. First band was The Blackouts, recorded one of the first concept albums 'Freak Out'. Zappa died of prostate cancer on 4th December 1993.
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I know. [emoji1]

Sent from my XT1058

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jet-A-Pumper on December 22, 2014, 09:59:20 AM
1st flight of what is, IMO, one of the coolest aircraft ever built by humans:

The SR-71 Blackbird

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on December 22, 2014, 12:42:28 PM
1st flight of what is, IMO, one of the coolest aircraft ever built by humans:

The SR-71 Blackbird


I'll second that.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on December 22, 2014, 12:57:26 PM
1st flight of what is, IMO, one of the coolest aircraft ever built by humans:

The SR-71 Blackbird


I'll second that.

Third-ed. Grew up in Yuba City near Beale AFB where the 9th SRW was based.  Watched many of those beauties take off in my youth. 

One of my high school friends was "interviewed" by the FBI because he drew up some rather accurate schematics of the SR cockpit controls using what was publicly available at the time. No Internet or Google at the time, kiddies. His dad was a retired aerospace engineer so the feds were rather concerned that there was some Soviet influence going on. Nope. Just a smarter-than-average high school kid who put 2 and 2 together. This was around the time the movie "War Games" came out so we kidded John that the sequel will be based on him.

Back on topic...

1864 – Union General William T. Sherman presents the city of Savannah, Georgia, to President Lincoln.

Sherman wired Lincoln with the message, “I beg to present you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with 150 heavy guns and plenty of ammunition, and also about 25,000 bales of cotton.”
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on December 22, 2014, 02:17:33 PM
Today in history, many years ago, it was December the 22nd. And, lo! the daylight started coming back.

Happy ex Winter Solstice everyone.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 22, 2014, 03:54:15 PM
Dec. 22, 1967
The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Pink Floyd, The Who, Keith West and Tomorrow, Eric Burdon & The Animals, 1984 (featuring future Queen guitarist Brian May) and Soft Machine all appeared at The Olympia, London at an all night festival 'Christmas On Earth Continued'. The DJ was John Peel plus the venue featured a paddling pool, light shows and a movie theatre, tickets £1.
Those were the days...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 23, 2014, 06:56:43 AM
Dec 25, 1941- Bing Crosby introduces "White Christmas" to the world.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 23, 2014, 10:45:18 AM
TODAY, however, 53 years and about 48 hours prior to Der Bingle...
Dec. 23, 1888,
Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh, suffering from severe depression, cuts off the lower part of his left ear with a razor while staying in Arles, France.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on December 23, 2014, 10:46:03 AM
Dec 25, 1941- Bing Crosby introduces "White Christmas" to the world.
Ummm, that's not 'today'.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 23, 2014, 09:27:19 PM
Today in history, many years ago, it was December the 22nd. And, lo! the daylight started coming back.

Happy ex Winter Solstice everyone.

Poppycock
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 24, 2014, 05:19:58 PM
The end of the 1812 war.

And Joules birthday.  A unit of work 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 24, 2014, 08:04:35 PM
The end of the 1812 war.
At 16:00 today, at the church on the battlefield of Lundy's Lane, the bell tolled to mark the end of hostilities.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 25, 2014, 06:43:34 AM
1914- German and British troops on the Western Front declare an unofficial truce to celebrate Christmas during World War I.

http://youtu.be/Xy9lg0aAhlE (http://youtu.be/Xy9lg0aAhlE)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 25, 2014, 01:45:37 PM
Dec. 25, 1651
The General Court of Boston levies a five shilling fine on anyone caught "observing any such day as Christmas", proving that the law was an ass even then.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 26, 2014, 10:34:41 AM
Dec. 26, 1979
The Soviet Union flies 5,000 troops to intervene in the Afghanistan conflict.
I wonder how that turns out...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on December 26, 2014, 10:48:34 AM
Dec. 26th, 2004

Ten years ago today a magnitude 9.1 earthquake struck off the coast of Aceh province in Indonesia, triggering a massive tsunami that inundated most of the land surrounding the Indian Ocean. An estimated 230,000 people died, with many tens of thousands more missing.


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on December 26, 2014, 05:02:25 PM
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on December 27, 2014, 04:55:43 AM
You funny.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on December 27, 2014, 05:02:21 AM
I just went back through that thread. Wow, we know how to have fun, eh?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on December 27, 2014, 05:02:59 AM
Doesn't Oprah have a show called "Where are they now"?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 27, 2014, 08:09:25 AM
1939-  A series of vicious earthquakes take 11,000 lives in Turkey.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 27, 2014, 09:40:37 AM
Dec. 27, 1944
Quote
As World War II dragged on, President Franklin D. Roosevelt orders his secretary of war to seize properties belonging to the Montgomery Ward company because the company refused to comply with a labor agreement.

In an effort to avert strikes in critical war-support industries, Roosevelt created the National War Labor Board in 1942. The board negotiated settlements between management and workers to avoid shut-downs in production that might cripple the war effort. During the war, the well-known retailer and manufacturer Montgomery Ward had supplied the Allies with everything from tractors to auto parts to workmen's clothing--items deemed as important to the war effort as bullets and ships. However, Montgomery Ward Chairman Sewell Avery refused to comply with the terms of three different collective bargaining agreements with the United Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union hammered out between 1943 and 1944. In April 1944, after Sewell refused a second board order, Roosevelt called out the Army National Guard to seize the company's main plant in Chicago. Sewell himself had to be carried out of his office by National Guard troops. By December of that year, Roosevelt was fed up with Sewell's obstinacy and disrespect for the government's authority. (The uber-capitalist Sewell's favorite insult was to call someone a "New Dealer"--a direct reference to Roosevelt's Depression-era policies.) On December 27, Roosevelt ordered the secretary of war to seize Montgomery Ward's plants and facilities in New York, Michigan, California, Illinois, Colorado and Oregon.

In his announcement that day, Roosevelt emphasized that the government would "not tolerate any interference with war production in this critical hour." He issued a stern warning to labor unions and industry management alike: "strikes in wartime cannot be condoned, whether they are strikes by workers against their employers or strikes by employers against their Government." Sewell took the fight to federal court, but lost.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 28, 2014, 07:27:21 AM
1971   The U.S. Justice Department sues Mississippi officials for ignoring the voting ballots of blacks in that state.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 28, 2014, 07:46:21 AM
William Semple Files Chewing Gum Patent (1869)
Existing in various forms since prehistoric times, chewing gum is one of the oldest types of candy still widely consumed today. Early chewing gums were made from plant resins. In 1869, dentist William Semple patented a rubber-based chewing gum that he envisioned as a tooth cleaning product. Around that time, confectioners discovered that chicle, a natural latex that was being explored as a possible rubber substitute, was an ideal gum base. What country banned chewing gum in 1992?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/chewing+gum (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/chewing+gum)


Happy Birthday to Woody Wilson

Wilson served as US president from 1913 to 1921, a period that spanned the country's involvement in World War I. Following the war, Wilson hoped to achieve world peace through his "Fourteen Points," but his progressive vision suffered numerous setbacks, and he ended his term incapacitated by a stroke. While trying to implement his plan at the Paris Peace Conference, he became the first US president to travel to Europe while in office. On what rare unit of US currency is Wilson's image featured?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Wilson,+Woodrow (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Wilson,+Woodrow)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 28, 2014, 08:04:27 AM
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/_/viewer.aspx?path=5%2F53%2F&name=US100000dollarsbillobverse.jpg&url=http%3A%2F%2Fencyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com%2FWilson%252c%2BWoodrow (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/_/viewer.aspx?path=5%2F53%2F&name=US100000dollarsbillobverse.jpg&url=http%3A%2F%2Fencyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com%2FWilson%252c%2BWoodrow)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 29, 2014, 09:10:04 AM
Wounded Knee Massacre (1890)

The Wounded Knee Massacre was the last major armed conflict of the Indian wars. After the death of Sitting Bull, a band of Sioux led by Big Foot fled into the badlands but was captured by the 7th Cavalry on December 28, 1890. The next day, as the Sioux were being disarmed, a scuffle broke out and a US officer was wounded. US troops then opened fire, killing about 200 men, women, and children in mere minutes. Who seized and occupied Wounded Knee for 71 days in 1973?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 29, 2014, 09:35:04 AM
1607   Indian chief Powhatan spares John Smith's life after the pleas of his daughter Pocahontas.

I always assumed that this was just fiction.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Black Hills on December 29, 2014, 09:55:10 AM
Wounded Knee Massacre (1890)

The Wounded Knee Massacre was the last major armed conflict of the Indian wars. After the death of Sitting Bull, a band of Sioux led by Big Foot fled into the badlands but was captured by the 7th Cavalry on December 28, 1890. The next day, as the Sioux were being disarmed, a scuffle broke out and a US officer was wounded. US troops then opened fire, killing about 200 men, women, and children in mere minutes. Who seized and occupied Wounded Knee for 71 days in 1973?

Russell and the boys (AIM). it's still not sorted out..
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Mr. Whippy on December 29, 2014, 10:35:24 AM
1170   Thomas Becket, the archbishop of Canterbury, is murdered in Canterbury Cathedral by four knights of Henry II.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 29, 2014, 10:42:21 AM
What country banned chewing gum in 1992?

Singapore/Indonesia?

Dec. 29, 1942
Born on this day, Rick Danko, guitar, vocals, The Band.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on December 29, 2014, 01:56:17 PM
Wounded Knee Massacre (1890)

The Wounded Knee Massacre was the last major armed conflict of the Indian wars. After the death of Sitting Bull, a band of Sioux led by Big Foot fled into the badlands but was captured by the 7th Cavalry on December 28, 1890. The next day, as the Sioux were being disarmed, a scuffle broke out and a US officer was wounded. US troops then opened fire, killing about 200 men, women, and children in mere minutes. Who seized and occupied Wounded Knee for 71 days in 1973?

Russell and the boys (AIM). it's still not sorted out..

"Where White Men Fear to Tread" Russell Means. Good book.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Black Hills on December 29, 2014, 02:14:04 PM
Wounded Knee Massacre (1890)

The Wounded Knee Massacre was the last major armed conflict of the Indian wars. After the death of Sitting Bull, a band of Sioux led by Big Foot fled into the badlands but was captured by the 7th Cavalry on December 28, 1890. The next day, as the Sioux were being disarmed, a scuffle broke out and a US officer was wounded. US troops then opened fire, killing about 200 men, women, and children in mere minutes. Who seized and occupied Wounded Knee for 71 days in 1973?

Russell and the boys (AIM). it's still not sorted out..

"Where White Men Fear to Tread" Russell Means. Good book.

things on the rez are not as they appear ;)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 30, 2014, 07:11:28 AM
1903    About 600 people died when fire broke out at the Iroquois Theater in Chicago.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 30, 2014, 07:28:07 AM
Dec. 30,1968
 Led Zeppelin (who were advertised as Len Zefflin), appeared at Gonzaga University Gymnasium, Spokane on their first North American tour supporting Vanilla Fudge.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on December 30, 2014, 11:01:13 AM
1922 USSR was formed
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on December 31, 2014, 06:28:35 AM
Dec. 31,1991
 Ted Nugent donated 200 pounds of venison to a Salvation Army soup kitchen in Detroit with the message 'I kill it, you grill it'.
 :chili:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on December 31, 2014, 07:13:32 AM
1852   The richest year of the gold rush ends with $81.3 million in gold produced.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on December 31, 2014, 08:38:39 AM
Dec. 31,1991
 Ted Nugent donated 200 pounds of venison to a Salvation Army soup kitchen in Detroit with the message 'I kill it, you grill it'.
 :chili:

I've done that.  Minus the "I kill it, you grill it".
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 01, 2015, 08:45:06 AM
1863   President Abraham Lincoln issues the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing the slaves in the Confederacy.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 01, 2015, 12:15:03 PM
Jan. 1, 1937
At a party at the Hormel Mansion in Minnesota, a guest wins $100 for naming a new canned meat–Spam.
http://youtu.be/anwy2MPT5RE (http://youtu.be/anwy2MPT5RE)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 01, 2015, 12:59:01 PM
Frankenstein Is Published (1818)

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's Frankenstein, or, the Modern Prometheus is a gothic novel that spawned a new genre of horror stories. It tells the story of Frankenstein, a scientist who discovers how to bring inanimate matter to life and, in the process, creates a man-monster. When Frankenstein fails to provide a mate to satisfy the creature's human emotions, it seeks revenge. Mary Shelley came up with the idea for the novel while vacationing at the home of what famous poet?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 01, 2015, 06:06:05 PM
Lord Byron.

What's with the interrogations?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on January 01, 2015, 07:13:11 PM
Stop asking questions you two!   :bigsmile:

This day, every year since 1582, New Year's Day. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 01, 2015, 08:59:46 PM
Stop asking questions you two three!   :bigsmile:

This day, every year since 1582, New Year's Day.
What was Jan. 1, 1581?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on January 01, 2015, 09:04:53 PM
Stop asking questions you two three!   :bigsmile:

This day, every year since 1582, New Year's Day.
What was Jan. 1, 1581?

Just another day. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 01, 2015, 09:51:42 PM
Stop asking questions you two three!   :bigsmile:

This day, every year since 1582, New Year's Day.
What was Jan. 1, 1581?

Just another day.
Saint Telemachus "just another" feast day"!!!
They probably had bacon!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on January 01, 2015, 10:36:26 PM
Stop asking questions you two three!   :bigsmile:

This day, every year since 1582, New Year's Day.
What was Jan. 1, 1581?

Just another day.
Saint Telemachus "just another" feast day"!!!
They probably had bacon!


I certainly hope so.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on January 02, 2015, 05:37:04 AM
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugatti_Type_57S_Atalante_(57502) (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugatti_Type_57S_Atalante_(57502))

On this day in 2009, media outlets report that a rare unrestored 1937 Bugatti Type 57S Atalante Coupe has been found in the garage of a British doctor. A month later, on February 7, the car sold at a Paris auction for some $4.4 million.

The black two-seater, one of just 17 57S Atalante Coupes ever made by Bugatti, had been owned by English orthopedic surgeon Harold Carr since 1955. Carr, who died in 2007, reportedly had kept the rare vehicle parked in his garage since the early 1960s and hadn't driven it in five decades. The car was built in May 1937 and originally owned by Francis Richard Henry Penn Curzon, the 5th Earl Howe. Curzon was also the first president of the British Racing Drivers' Club and a winner of the 24 Hour Le Mans race.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 02, 2015, 06:55:16 AM
Jan.2, 1974
In a day that will live in infamy, President Richard M. Nixon signs the Emergency Highway Energy Conservation Act, setting a new national maximum speed limit.
Nixon signed a federal law lowering all national highway speed limits to 55 mph. The act was intended to force Americans to drive at speeds deemed more fuel-efficient, thereby curbing the U.S. appetite for foreign oil. With it, Nixon ushered in a policy of fuel conservation and rationing not seen since World War II.
In response, Sammy Hagar wrote "I Can't Drive 55".
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 02, 2015, 07:24:24 AM
1936   In Berlin, Nazi officials claim that their treatment of Jews is not the business of the League of Nations.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 02, 2015, 09:23:59 AM
Birthdate of Isaac Asimov (1920)

Asimov was an exceptionally prolific Russian-American author who achieved great success with his science-fiction and popular science books. Along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, he was considered one of the "Big Three" science-fiction authors of his era. Though best known for his scientific works, Asimov wrote on a diverse range of subjects, including the Bible and Shakespeare, penning more than 400 volumes in all. What robot-related term did he coin in the course of his writings?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on January 02, 2015, 04:29:20 PM
The 3 laws of robotics
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: olderigetfasteriam on January 02, 2015, 05:02:01 PM
[url]http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugatti_Type_57S_Atalante_(57502)[/url] ([url]http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugatti_Type_57S_Atalante_(57502))[/url]

On this day in 2009, media outlets report that a rare unrestored 1937 Bugatti Type 57S Atalante Coupe has been found in the garage of a British doctor. A month later, on February 7, the car sold at a Paris auction for some $4.4 million.

The black two-seater, one of just 17 57S Atalante Coupes ever made by Bugatti, had been owned by English orthopedic surgeon Harold Carr since 1955. Carr, who died in 2007, reportedly had kept the rare vehicle parked in his garage since the early 1960s and hadn't driven it in five decades. The car was built in May 1937 and originally owned by Francis Richard Henry Penn Curzon, the 5th Earl Howe. Curzon was also the first president of the British Racing Drivers' Club and a winner of the 24 Hour Le Mans race.

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I imagine his heirs were very, very happy!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 03, 2015, 06:16:10 AM
Jan. 3, 1976
The Bay City Rollers went to No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Saturday Night.' At the height of their US success, the Scottish group signed a deal to promote breakfast cereal.
 :rolleyes: :facepalm: :shrug:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 03, 2015, 07:00:47 AM
The Curse of the Bambino (1920)

According to baseball lore, the Boston Red Sox became cursed after Babe Ruth, the "Bambino," was sold to the New York Yankees in 1920. Before the sale, the Red Sox had won five World Series titles. After the sale, Ruth became a superstar, and the previously lackluster Yankees went on to win 27 World Series titles. The Red Sox, meanwhile, failed to win another series for more than eight decades, finally breaking the "curse" in 2004.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 03, 2015, 07:01:49 AM
Todays birthday J.R.R. Tolkien (1892)

Though we know him today as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings—the creator of the fantastic Middle Earth, the inventor of hobbits and orcs and Elvish, indeed the "father of modern fantasy literature"—Tolkien was also a respected medieval scholar and professor. He worked briefly for The Oxford English Dictionary, taught at Leeds University and then Oxford, and produced a landmark lecture on Beowulf.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 03, 2015, 07:24:43 AM
1977   Apple Computers incorporates.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 03, 2015, 02:46:59 PM
Why didnt i buy stock in them?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 03, 2015, 03:01:14 PM
Why didnt i buy stock in them?

Boy, no kidding! When I lived in Seattle, I met a former carpenter that bought a bunch of Microsoft stock at the beginning.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 03, 2015, 08:37:21 PM
Sergio Leone is born in 1929.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 04, 2015, 06:24:47 AM
Jan.4, 1986
 Irish singer, songwriter and bassist Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy died of heart failure and pneumonia after being in a coma for eight days following a drug overdose. Had the 1973 hit 'Whiskey in the Jar', (their version of the traditional Irish song), 1978 album 'Live and Dangerous' spent 62 weeks on the UK chart. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street in Dublin in 2005.
RIP Phil.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 04, 2015, 08:07:48 AM
Jan.4, 1986
 Irish singer, songwriter and bassist Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy died of heart failure and pneumonia after being in a coma for eight days following a drug overdose. Had the 1973 hit 'Whiskey in the Jar', (their version of the traditional Irish song), 1978 album 'Live and Dangerous' spent 62 weeks on the UK chart. A life-size bronze statue of Phil Lynott was unveiled on Harry Street in Dublin in 2005.
RIP Phil.
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 :'(
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 04, 2015, 09:03:51 AM
1999   Jesse "The Body" Ventura, a former professional wrestler, is sworn in as populist governor of Minnesota.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 05, 2015, 07:04:21 AM
Jackie Robinson Retires (1957)

The birthday of the safety razor inventor  King C. Gillette (1855)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 05, 2015, 07:26:04 AM
1923   The U.S. Senate debates the benefits of Peyote for the American Indian.  :bigsmile:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on January 05, 2015, 12:53:24 PM
1923   The U.S. Senate debates the benefits of Peyote for the American Indian.  :bigsmile:

Also the first recorded utterance of "Like, Wow Man!" in the Congressional Record.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 05, 2015, 03:43:20 PM
5 January 1941,
Famed British aviator, Amy Johnson CBE, a First Officer* with the Air Transport Auxiliary, took off from RAF Squires Gate, Blackpool, in an Airspeed AS.10 Oxford Mk.II, V3540, enroute RAF Kidlington, Oxfordshire. The twin-engine airplane was commonly used as an aircrew flight trainer. For reasons not known, at approximately 3:30 p.m., Johnson bailed out of the Oxford and parachuted into the Thames Estuary. The airplane crashed into the river a short distance away and sank.
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Amy Johnson’s parachute was seen by the crew of HMS Haslemere. They attempted to rescue her and in the process, the ship’s captain, Lieutenant Commander Walter Edmund Fletcher, Royal Navy, dove into the water. In the cold temperatures and rough water, Fletcher died. For his effort to rescue Johnson, he was awarded the Albert Medal, posthumously. Amy Johnson is presumed to have drowned. Her body was not recovered.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 06, 2015, 07:14:24 AM
Roger Keith "Syd" Barrett (1946)

Barrett, an English singer, songwriter, guitarist, and artist, was one of the founding members of Pink Floyd. The band formed in 1965, and it soon became the most popular group in the "London Underground" psychedelic music scene. As the group's popularity grew, Barrett began behaving increasingly erratically, and he left Pink Floyd in 1968 amid speculations of mental illness exacerbated by drug use. After a short-lived solo career, Barrett retreated from public life and returned to doing what?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jay547 on January 06, 2015, 07:28:41 AM
For reasons not known, at approximately 3:30 p.m., Johnson bailed out of the Oxford and parachuted into the Thames Estuary. The airplane crashed into the river a short distance away and sank.

Interesting...

There is still some mystery about the accident, as the exact reason for the flight is still a government secret and there is some evidence that besides Johnson and Fletcher a third person (possibly someone she was supposed to ferry somewhere) was also seen in the water and also died. Who the third party was is still unknown. Johnson was the first member of the Air Transport Auxiliary to die in service. Her death in an Oxford aircraft was ironic, as she had been one of the original subscribers to the share offer for Airspeed.

However, in 1999 it was reported that Tom Mitchell, from Crowborough, Sussex, claimed to have shot the heroine down when she twice failed to give the correct identification code during the flight. He said: "The reason Amy was shot down was because she gave the wrong colour of the day [a signal to identify aircraft known by all British forces] over radio." Mr. Mitchell explained how the aircraft was sighted and contacted by radio. A request was made for the signal. She gave the wrong one twice. "Sixteen rounds of shells were fired and the plane dived into the Thames Estuary. We all thought it was an enemy plane until the next day when we read the papers and discovered it was Amy. The officers told us never to tell anyone what happened."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 06, 2015, 09:52:10 AM
January 6, 1975
A crowd of 2,000-plus lines up outside Boston Garden to buy tickets to the rock band Led Zeppelin. Some in the crowd then broke in to the near-empty arena, and caused thousands of dollars in damage.
The near-riot was calmed by around 2:30 a.m., when the Garden staff began selling tickets hours ahead of schedule. By 6:00 a.m., all 9,000 seats were sold out and the crowd had dispersed, but not before causing upwards of $50,000 damage to the Garden and infuriating the Boston's mayor, Kevin H. White.

No one could accuse Mayor White of failing to understand the power of rock and roll. Back in 1972, he had personally intervened to free the Rolling Stones from a Warwick, Rhode Island, jail rather than risk a riot by angry Stones fans if a scheduled concert in Boston that night were cancelled. White came down hard on the Led Zeppelin rioters. Not only did he cancel the concert scheduled for February 4, but he also announced that the band would not be allowed to perform in Boston for the next five years. In fact, Led Zeppelin would never perform there again. Banned in Beantown, the group moved on to the next stop on their 1975 North American tour and bypassed Boston on their next one in 1977.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 07, 2015, 05:31:17 AM
Jan. 7,1971,
Black Sabbath released 'Paranoid' their second studio album in the US. The album features the band's best-known signature songs, including the title track, 'Iron Man' and 'War Pigs'. The album was originally titled War Pigs, but allegedly the record company changed it to Paranoid, fearing backlash from supporters of the ongoing Vietnam War.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 07, 2015, 08:07:28 AM
1979   Pol Pot and his Khmer Rouge are overthrown when Vietnamese troops seize the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 07, 2015, 08:08:38 AM
Nanakusa Matsuri (2015)

Nanuska Matsuri is a Japanese ceremony dating back to the 9th century. It is also called Wakana-setsu ("Festival of Young Herbs"), or Jin-jitsu ("Man Day"), because it occurs on the zodiacal day for "man." After an offering to the clan deity in the morning, participants partake of nanakusa gayu, a rice gruel seasoned with seven different herbs that is said to have been served for its medicinal value to the young prince of the Emperor Saga. The herbs are shepherd's-purse, chickweed, parsley, cottonweed, radish, as well as herbs known as hotoke-no-za and aona in Japanese
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 07, 2015, 08:09:48 AM
Leaning Tower of Pisa Begins Decade-Long Closure (1990)

The Leaning Tower is the freestanding bell tower of a cathedral in Pisa, Italy. Though designed to stand upright, Pisa's most famous landmark began leaning soon after construction began in 1173. In 1964, Italy's government enlisted the aid of a multinational task force to prevent the tower from toppling, but the tilt remained so severe that the tower was closed to the public in 1990. After another decade of stabilization efforts, it was reopened in 2001. What first caused it to lean?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Leaning+Tower+of+Pisa (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Leaning+Tower+of+Pisa)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 07, 2015, 10:59:19 AM

What first caused it to lean?
A gentle push on the bars?
 :thumbsup:
Quote
nanakusa gayu, a rice gruel seasoned with seven different herbs that is said to have been served for its medicinal value to the young prince of the Emperor Saga. The herbs are shepherd's-purse, chickweed, parsley, cottonweed, radish, as well as herbs known as hotoke-no-za and aona in Japanese
Keep the ditch-weeds, I shall toast Saga the Younger this evening as The Bar is serving Maotai.


Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 09, 2015, 07:11:02 AM
Burn her!   She's a WITCH!!!!!!!!!!

Joan of Arc Goes on Trial (1431)

Joan of Arc was a French military leader and heroine who was canonized a saint in 1920, nearly 500 years after she was burned at the stake. Claiming to be inspired by religious visions, she organized the French resistance that forced the English to end their siege of Orléans in 1429 and led an army to Rheims, where she had the dauphin, Charles VII, crowned king. Captured and sold to the English by the Burgundians, she was later tried for heresy and executed. What was the "nullification trial"?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Joan+of+Arc (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Joan+of+Arc)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 09, 2015, 07:12:14 AM
Man he is getting up there in age.  Happy Birthday Jimmy.

Jimmy Page (1944)

One of the most influential guitarists in the history of rock music, Page started his career as a highly sought-after studio guitarist in England. Under his direction, Led Zeppelin became one of the era's most successful rock groups, redefining the musical sound of the 70s. He has co-written many of rock's most popular anthems, including "Stairway to Heaven," which has been the subject of controversy ever since reports surfaced that it contains subliminal messages that can be heard in what way?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 09, 2015, 08:07:43 AM
1915   Pancho Villa signs a treaty with the United States, halting border conflicts.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 09, 2015, 11:49:40 AM
Jan. 9, 1493,
Italian explorer Christopher Columbus, sailing near the Dominican Republic, sees three "mermaids"--in reality manatees--and describes them as "not half as beautiful as they are painted."
The sea does strange things to a man...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on January 10, 2015, 04:51:07 AM
Burn her!   She's a WITCH!!!!!!!!!!

Joan of Arc Goes on Trial (1431)

Joan of Arc was a French military leader and heroine who was canonized a saint in 1920, nearly 500 years after she was burned at the stake. Claiming to be inspired by religious visions, she organized the French resistance that forced the English to end their siege of Orléans in 1429 and led an army to Rheims, where she had the dauphin, Charles VII, crowned king. Captured and sold to the English by the Burgundians, she was later tried for heresy and executed. What was the "nullification trial"?

[url]http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Joan+of+Arc[/url] ([url]http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Joan+of+Arc[/url])


In this case, it was a second trial, after her death, to remove the cjarges (which included damnation to hell) against her.

She was also betrayed by the French.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 10, 2015, 05:57:03 AM
Jan. 10, 2013
Claude Nobs the founder and general manager of the Montreux Jazz Festival died aged 76. During a 1971 Frank Zappa concert, at the Montreux Casino the venue caught fire. Nobs saved several young people who had hidden in the casino, thinking they would be sheltered from the flames. This act earned him a mention (as Funky Claude in the line "Funky Claude was running in and out pulling kids out on the ground") in the Deep Purple song Smoke on the Water, which is about the incident
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 11, 2015, 06:42:10 AM
Jan. 11, 1988
Pappy Boyington died this day.

Undoubtedly the most colorful and well known Marine Corps' ace, he was commanding officer of VMF-214.

Stories of Pappy Boyington are legion, many founded in fact, including how he led the legendary Black Sheep squadron, and how he served in China as a member of the American Volunteer Group, the famed Flying Tigers.  He spent a year and a half as a Japanese POW, was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, was recognized as the Marine Corps top ace.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 11, 2015, 08:03:22 AM

1948   President Harry S. Truman proposes free, two-year community colleges for all who want an education.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 12, 2015, 08:14:34 AM
1915   The U.S. Congress establishes Rocky Mountain National Park.
      :clap:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 12, 2015, 03:08:11 PM
Jan. 12, 1969
Led Zeppelin's debut album was released in the UK. Recorded at Olympic Studios in Barnes, London, the album took only about 36 hours of studio time to complete at a cost of just £1,782, most of the tracks being recorded 'live' in the studio with very few overdubs. The album spent a total of 71 weeks on the UK chart.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 13, 2015, 07:20:01 AM
First Mickey Mouse Comic Strip Released (1930)

Mickey Mouse's first incarnation of sorts was as Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, created by Walt Disney for Universal Studios. After Universal threatened to cut Disney's budget, Disney reorganized his studio and created Mickey to keep his company afloat. Mickey was rather mischievous in early cartoons but later evolved into a well-meaning everyman. Today, he is one of the most recognizable cartoon characters in the world. What did Disney call his cartoon mouse before his wife suggested "Mickey"?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 13, 2015, 07:21:30 AM
Todays Birthday Wilhelm Wien (1864)

German physicist Wilhelm Wien is noted for his work on hydrodynamics, X-rays, and the radiation of light, but it was his work on blackbody radiation that set him apart in the field. In 1893, he derived a law that relates the maximum emission of a blackbody to its temperature. In 1911, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in recognition of his "discoveries regarding the laws governing the radiation of heat." His work contributed significantly to the development of what branch of physics?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Wien,+Wilhelm (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Wien,+Wilhelm)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on January 13, 2015, 09:07:45 AM
Jan 13, 1128:
Pope recognizes Knights Templar
On this day in 1128, Pope Honorius II grants a papal sanction to the military order known as the Knights Templar, declaring it to be an army of God.

Led by the Frenchman Hughes de Payens, the Knights Templar organization was founded in 1118. Its self-imposed mission was to protect Christian pilgrims on their way to the Holy Land during the Crusades, the series of military expeditions aimed at defeating Muslims in Palestine. The Templars took their name from the location of their headquarters, at Jerusalem's Temple Mount. For a while, the Templars had only nine members, mostly due to their rigid rules. In addition to having noble birth, the knights were required to take strict vows of poverty, obedience and chastity. In 1127, new promotional efforts convinced many more noblemen to join the order, gradually increasing its size and influence.

While the individual knights were not allowed to own property, there was no such restriction on the organization as a whole, and over the years many rich Christians gave gifts of land and other valuables to support the Knights Templar. By the time the Crusades ended unsuccessfully in the early 14th century, the order had grown extremely wealthy, provoking the jealousy of both religious and secular powers. In 1307, King Philip IV of France and Pope Clement V combined to take down the Knights Templar, arresting the grand master, Jacques de Molay, on charges of heresy, sacrilege and Satanism. Under torture, Molay and other leading Templars confessed and were eventually burned at the stake. Clement dissolved the Templars in 1312, assigning their property and monetary assets to a rival order, the Knights Hospitalers. In fact, though, Philip and his English counterpart, King Edward II, claimed most of the wealth after banning the organization from their respective countries.         

The modern-day Catholic Church has admitted that the persecution of the Knights Templar was unjustified and claimed that Pope Clement was pressured by secular rulers to dissolve the order. Over the centuries, myths and legends about the Templars have grown, including the belief that they may have discovered holy relics at Temple Mount, including the Holy Grail, the Ark of the Covenant or parts of the cross from Christ's crucifixion. The imagined secrets of the Templars have inspired various books and movies, including the blockbuster novel and film The Da Vinci Code.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 13, 2015, 09:30:09 AM
...required to take strict vows of poverty, obedience and chastity....

Steerike three, I'm OUT, thanx.


13 January 1942
Helmut Schenk, became the first person to escape from a stricken aircraft with an ejection seat, after his control surfaces iced up and became inoperable. The fighter, (Heinkel He 280 V1, DL+AS), was the first prototype. being used in tests of the Argus As 014 impulse jets for Fieseler Fi 103 missile development, had its usual HeS 8A turbojets removed, and was towed aloft from Rechlin, Germany by a pair of Bf 110C tugs in a heavy snow-shower. At 7,875 feet (2,400 m), Schenk found he had no control, jettisoned his towline, and ejected.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on January 13, 2015, 09:41:44 AM
First Mickey Mouse Comic Strip Released (1930)

Mickey Mouse's first incarnation of sorts was as Oswald the Lucky Rabbit, created by Walt Disney for Universal Studios. After Universal threatened to cut Disney's budget, Disney reorganized his studio and created Mickey to keep his company afloat. Mickey was rather mischievous in early cartoons but later evolved into a well-meaning everyman. Today, he is one of the most recognizable cartoon characters in the world. What did Disney call his cartoon mouse before his wife suggested "Mickey"?

Tommy The Rat? (Say baby...)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GB9dIieS7KQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GB9dIieS7KQ)

What Masonic appendent body was created honoring the Templar's Grand Master who died at the hands of those wanting the properties of the Templars? The precepts based on the TGM's refusal to give up the names of other Templars; even unto death.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on January 13, 2015, 12:34:04 PM

His work contributed significantly to the development of what branch of physics?

That would be quantum mechanics, sir. [emoji2]


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 14, 2015, 11:22:29 AM
Jan. 14, 1969
An explosion aboard the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise kills 27 people in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. A rocket accidentally detonated, destroying 15 planes and injuring more than 300 people.
At 8:19 a.m. on January 14, a MK-32 Zuni rocket that was loaded on an F-4 Phantom jet overheated due to the exhaust from another vehicle. The rocket blew up, setting off a chain reaction of explosions. Fires broke out across the deck of the ship, and when jet fuel flowed into the carrier's interior, other fires were sparked. Many of the Enterprise's fire-protection features failed to work properly, but the crew worked heroically and tirelessly to extinguish the fire.
In all, 27 sailors lost their lives and another 314 were seriously injured. Although 15 aircraft (out of the 32 stationed on the Enterprise at the time) were destroyed by the explosions and fire, the Enterprise itself was never threatened.
The USS Enterprise was repaired over several months at Pearl Harbor and returned to action later in the year.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 15, 2015, 06:50:38 PM
Martin Luther King was born on this date in 1929.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 15, 2015, 06:54:11 PM
President John Fitzgerald Kennedy says U.S. troops are not fighting in Vietnam.  1962

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/kennedy-says-us-troops-are-not-fighting (http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/kennedy-says-us-troops-are-not-fighting)
Quote
Asked at a news conference if U.S. troops are fighting in Vietnam, President Kennedy answers "No." He was technically correct, but U.S. soldiers were serving as combat advisers with the South Vietnamese army, and U.S. pilots were flying missions with the South Vietnamese Air Force. While acting in this advisory capacity, some soldiers invariably got wounded, and press correspondents based in Saigon were beginning to see casualties from the "support" missions and ask questions.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 15, 2015, 06:57:04 PM
President Richard Milhouse Nixon halts aggression against North Vietnam. 1973

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/nixon-halts-military-action-against-north-vietnam (http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/nixon-halts-military-action-against-north-vietnam)
Quote
Citing "progress" in the Paris peace negotiations between National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger and Le Duc Tho of North Vietnam, President Richard Nixon halts the most concentrated bombing of the war, as well as mining, shelling, and all other offensive action against North Vietnam. The cessation of direct attacks against North Vietnam did not extend to South Vietnam, where the fighting continued as both sides jockeyed for control of territory before the anticipated cease-fire.

On December 13, North Vietnamese negotiators had walked out of secret talks with Kissinger. President Nixon issued an ultimatum to Hanoi to send its representatives back to the conference table within 72 hours "or else." The North Vietnamese rejected Nixon's demand and the president ordered Operation Linebacker II, a full-scale air campaign against the Hanoi area. This operation was the most concentrated air offensive of the war.

During the 11 days of the attack, 700 B-52 sorties and more than 1,000 fighter-bomber sorties dropped roughly 20,000 tons of bombs, mostly over the densely populated area between Hanoi and Haiphong. On December 28, after 11 days of intensive bombing, the North Vietnamese agreed to return to the talks. When the negotiators met again in early January, they quickly worked out a settlement. The Paris Peace Accords were signed on January 23 and a cease-fire went into effect five days later.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 15, 2015, 07:56:39 PM
Jan. 15, 1996
 Jamaican authorities opened fire on Jimmy Buffett's seaplane, mistaking it for a drug trafficker's plane. U2 singer Bono was also on the plane; neither singer was injured in the incident.
 The incident inspired Buffett to write a song called 'Jamaica Mistaica'.
http://youtu.be/4ov6E19_plA (http://youtu.be/4ov6E19_plA)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 16, 2015, 06:45:47 AM
Ivan the Terrible Crowned Tsar of Russia (1547)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 16, 2015, 07:08:32 AM

1965   Eighteen are arrested in Mississippi for the murder of three civil rights workers.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 16, 2015, 10:58:57 AM
January 16, 1909,
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On this date, three members of an Ernest Shackleton expedition to Antarctica – Edgeworth David, Douglas Mawson and Alistair Mackay – raised a British flag and recorded the moment by photograph at what they thought was Earth’s South Magnetic Pole.
Mawson would later realize that he’d overlooked some important calculations made several years previously by another researcher. In 1913, Edgeworth David admitted that their party had reached only “an outlier of the main magnetic pole,” not the true South Magnetic Pole itself. Yet their valiant effort is still remembered both in the history of science and in polar exploration.
As of 2005, the location of the wandering South Magnetic Pole was calculated to lie at 64°31′ South latitude, and 137°51′ East longitude, placing it off the coast of Antarctica and even outside the Antarctic Circle.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 17, 2015, 05:30:43 AM
Jan. 17, 1966
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On this day, a B-52 bomber collides with a KC-135 jet tanker over Spain's Mediterranean coast, dropping three 70-kiloton hydrogen bombs near the town of Palomares and one in the sea..

As a means of maintaining first-strike capability during the Cold War, U.S. bombers laden with nuclear weapons circled the earth ceaselessly for decades. In a military operation of this magnitude, it was inevitable that accidents would occur. The Pentagon admits to more than three-dozen accidents in which bombers either crashed or caught fire on the runway, resulting in nuclear contamination from a damaged or destroyed bomb and/or the loss of a nuclear weapon. One of the only "Broken Arrows" to receive widespread publicity occurred on January 17, 1966, when a B-52 bomber crashed into a KC-135 jet tanker over Spain.

The bomber was returning to its North Carolina base following a routine airborne alert mission along the southern route of the Strategic Air Command when it attempted to refuel with a jet tanker. The B-52 collided with the fueling boom of the tanker, ripping the bomber open and igniting the fuel. The KC-135 exploded, killing all four of its crew members, but four members of the seven-man B-52 crew managed to parachute to safety. None of the bombs were armed, but explosive material in two of the bombs that fell to earth exploded upon impact, forming craters and scattering radioactive plutonium over the fields of Palomares. A third bomb landed in a dry riverbed and was recovered relatively intact. The fourth bomb fell into the sea at an unknown location.

Palomares, a remote fishing and farming community, was soon filled with nearly 2,000 U.S. military personnel and Spanish civil guards who rushed to clean up the debris and decontaminate the area. The U.S. personnel took precautions to prevent overexposure to the radiation, but the Spanish workers, who lived in a country that lacked experience with nuclear technology, did not. Eventually some 1,400 tons of radioactive soil and vegetation were shipped to the United States for disposal.

Meanwhile, at sea, 33 U.S. Navy vessels were involved in the search for the lost hydrogen bomb. Using an IBM computer, experts tried to calculate where the bomb might have landed, but the impact area was still too large for an effective search. Finally, an eyewitness account by a Spanish fisherman led the investigators to a one-mile area. On March 15, a submarine spotted the bomb, and on April 7 it was recovered. It was damaged but intact.

Studies on the effects of the nuclear accident on the people of Palomares were limited, but the United States eventually settled some 500 claims by residents whose health was adversely affected. Because the accident happened in a foreign country, it received far more publicity than did the dozen or so similar crashes that occurred within U.S. borders. As a security measure, U.S. authorities do not announce nuclear weapons accidents, and some American citizens may have unknowingly been exposed to radiation that resulted from aircraft crashes and emergency bomb jettisons. Today, two hydrogen bombs and a uranium core lie in yet undetermined locations in the Wassaw Sound off Georgia, in the Puget Sound off Washington, and in swamplands near Goldsboro, North Carolina.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on January 17, 2015, 07:04:52 AM
On this date in 1920, Prohibition went into effect.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 17, 2015, 07:14:43 AM
1893   Queen Liliuokalani, the Hawaiian monarch, is overthrown by a group of American sugar planters led by Sanford Ballard Dole.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 17, 2015, 08:55:04 AM
I am the GREATEST!



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It is MY birthday Ed!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 17, 2015, 08:55:45 AM
Matt Drudge Breaks the Lewinsky Scandal (1998)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 17, 2015, 09:19:09 AM
Take a look at your $100 bill and say Happy Birthday!

Benjamin Franklin's Birthday (2015)

Born in Boston on this day in 1706, Benjamin Franklin helped edit, and was a signer of, the Declaration of Independence. He also helped to frame the Constitution. When he died in 1790 in Philadelphia, he was given the most impressive funeral that city had ever seen: 20,000 people attended. In Philadelphia, the Franklin Institute Science Museum holds a two-day "birthday bash" that often involves people dressing as Franklin. The celebration takes place on the weekend preceding Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, which is the Monday after January 15
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 17, 2015, 01:50:02 PM
Take a look at your $100 bill .......



 :rolf:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 17, 2015, 04:39:45 PM
 :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 19, 2015, 12:17:47 PM
19 January 1975:
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Major Roger J. Smith, United States Air Force, a test pilot assigned to the F-15 Joint Test Force at Edwards AFB, California, flew the  McDonnell Douglas F-15A-6-MC 72-0119, Streak Eagle, to its seventh Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) and a U.S. National Aeronautic Association time-to-altitude record. From brake release at Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota, the F-15 reached 20,000 meters (65,616 feet) in 122.94 seconds.
 
This was the seventh time-to-altitude record set by Streak Eagle in just three days.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 19, 2015, 05:06:38 PM
Fuck that is quick.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 20, 2015, 06:53:17 AM
1930   Charles Lindbergh arrives in New York, setting a cross country flying record of 14.75 hours.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 20, 2015, 09:32:19 AM
Jan. 20, 1969
Led Zeppelin appeared at the Wheaton Youth Center, Wheaton, during their first North American tour. Some reports suggest that only 55 fans attended this show, (if so, this would make it the smallest audience they ever played to). This show was on a Monday and the night of Richard Nixon's inauguration. Zeppelin were paid $250 to appear.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 22, 2015, 09:00:50 AM
1912   Second Monte Carlo auto race begins.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on January 22, 2015, 11:36:49 AM
1912   Second Monte Carlo auto race begins.

Is it still on?

That's a very long race.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 22, 2015, 04:37:41 PM
Jan. 22, 1904
Percy Zell Michener was born, the U.S. civil engineer who supervised the construction, completed in 1964, of the 28-km (17 1/2-mi) Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel across the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay in eastern Virginia, considered a marvel of modern engineering and one of the most impressive transportation facilities in the world.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: xsrider on January 22, 2015, 11:43:48 PM
In 1960, the U.S. Navy-operated bathyscaphe Trieste carried two men to the deepest known point in the Pacific Ocean, reaching a depth of more than 35,000 feet.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 23, 2015, 10:45:39 AM
Jan. 23, 1957
Machines at the Wham-O toy company roll out the first batch of their aerodynamic plastic discs--now known to millions of fans all over the world as Frisbees.
By aggressively marketing Frisbee-playing as a new sport, Wham-O sold over 100 million units of its famous toy by 1977.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 23, 2015, 11:24:59 AM
Pink floyd released animals
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 23, 2015, 12:32:50 PM
Pink floyd released animals

 :hail:

Wham-O toy company introduces the world to Frisbees.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 24, 2015, 05:50:27 AM
 :shrug:
Jan. 24, 1915
The German cruiser (Frau) Blücher is sunk by a British squadron in the Battle of Dogger Bank.

http://youtu.be/hs5j8uUR2nc (http://youtu.be/hs5j8uUR2nc)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 24, 2015, 07:51:13 AM

1848   Gold is discovered by James Wilson Marshall at his partner Johann August Sutter's sawmill on the South Fork of the American River, near Coloma, California.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 24, 2015, 02:34:48 PM
Original Apple Macintosh Computer Released (1984)Named after the McIntosh variety of apple, the original Macintosh computer was released by Apple Inc. in 1984. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 25, 2015, 05:28:17 AM
Nellie Bly Goes Around the World (1890)

Elizabeth Jane Cochran—better known by her pen name, Nellie Bly—was a pioneering investigative reporter. She feigned insanity in order to be committed to the Women's Lunatic Asylum on New York City's Blackwell's Island and expose the institution's horrific and abusive treatment methods. In 1889, she embarked on a 24,899-mile (40,071-km) journey around the world inspired by the Jules Verne novel Around the World in Eighty Days. Her trip, however, was somewhat shorter. How long did it take?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 25, 2015, 06:27:51 AM
Jan. 25, 1936,
Donald Featherstone is born this day, an American artist who designed the original plastic pink flamingo lawn ornament, at age 21, having just graduated from Worcester Art Museum School. His first project was a plastic lawn duck for the plastic products manufacturer, Union Products of Leominster, Massachussetts (founded 1946). His second was the flamingo, originated in Sep 1957.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 25, 2015, 08:53:06 AM
1949   Axis Sally, who broadcasted Nazi propaganda to U.S. troops in Europe, stands trial in the United States for war crimes.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on January 25, 2015, 08:20:37 PM
Jan 25 '79   Robert Williams became the first man killed by a robot - at the Ford Motor Co.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 25, 2015, 08:29:24 PM
The first transcontinental phone call. 100 years ago today. Alexander Graham Bell would be astounded, but not surprised, at where we are today.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 26, 2015, 05:29:58 AM
1912   Second Monte Carlo auto race begins.

Is it still on?

That's a very long race.

It is a slow race. There are drivers that havent passed the start line yet.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 26, 2015, 07:29:43 AM
1533   Henry VIII marries Anne Boleyn.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on January 26, 2015, 08:39:01 AM
1969

Crimson and Clover (Tommy James & The Shondells) was a hit.



Sent from my XT1058

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on January 26, 2015, 08:52:58 AM
The east coast gets hit by 2+ feet of snow.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 26, 2015, 09:24:25 AM
Australia Day (2015)


The anniversary of the first British settlement in Australia on January 26, 1788, was formerly known as Foundation Day or Anniversary Day. Captain Arthur Phillip and his company of British convicts arrived first at Botany Bay, and when that proved to be unsuitable, they moved on to Port Jackson, where the city of Sydney was eventually established. First officially celebrated in 1818, Australia Day has been a public holiday since 1838. It used to be observed on either January 26 or the nearest Monday, but, since 1994, it has been observed on January 26 with celebrations all over the country.


Also

Happy Birthday Douglas MacArthur (1880).  I have to go get a corncob pipe now.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 26, 2015, 02:38:37 PM
Jan. 26, 1976
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Death of Forster Herbert Martin Maynard, New Zealand WWI flying ace (6 kills, 5 of them Albatros), Air Officer Commanding of Malta during the early part of WWII.

When Italy declared war in June 1940, a part of the very limited strength of the fighter squadron based at Malta were four Gloster Gladiators, which were found in crates marked "Boxed Spares – Property of the Royal Navy" (these having been left by HMS Glorious in April). Maynard obtained permission to assemble them, and three of these units, named "Faith", "Hope", and "Charity", were part of the initially limited defence during the Siege of Malta.

Faith
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 26, 2015, 08:21:05 PM
Jan. 26, 1976
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Death of Forster Herbert Martin Maynard, New Zealand WWI flying ace (6 kills, 5 of them Albatros), Air Officer Commanding of Malta during the early part of WWII.

When Italy declared war in June 1940, a part of the very limited strength of the fighter squadron based at Malta were four Gloster Gladiators, which were found in crates marked "Boxed Spares – Property of the Royal Navy" (these having been left by HMS Glorious in April). Maynard obtained permission to assemble them, and three of these units, named "Faith", "Hope", and "Charity", were part of the initially limited defence during the Siege of Malta.

Faith
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That's a great story, Thanks.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 27, 2015, 07:48:26 AM
1973   A cease fire in Vietnam is called as the Paris peace accords are signed by the United States and North Vietnam.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: PatM on January 27, 2015, 07:56:25 AM
2015 Today in history Facebook was down for about an hour. Earth stopped.  :willy: :willy: :willy:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on January 27, 2015, 07:58:52 AM
2015 Today in history Facebook was down for about an hour. Earth stopped.  :willy: :willy: :willy:


I couldn't care less.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 27, 2015, 08:27:33 AM
The day the music was born 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756)

Mozart is considered one of the greatest composers of European classical music, having written an astonishing number of works in almost every musical genre during his short life. A child prodigy, he began composing music by the age of five and was touring and performing before royalty within a year. He later settled in Vienna, where he reached the height of his success. At the age of 35, he succumbed to an unknown illness that remains a source of speculation. What are some of the theories?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 27, 2015, 08:28:41 AM
Outer Space Treaty Signed (1967)

The Outer Space Treaty represents the basic legal framework of international space law. It bans the stationing of weapons of mass destruction in outer space, exclusively limits the use of the Moon and other celestial bodies to peaceful purposes, holds countries responsible for any damage caused by the objects they launch, and forbids any government from claiming a celestial body, such as the Moon or a planet. The Moon Treaty was approved 12 years later but was considered a failure. Why?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Outer+Space+Treaty (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Outer+Space+Treaty)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 27, 2015, 08:39:52 AM
Jan. 27, 1957,

The last North American Aviation P-51 Mustangs in squadron service with the United States Air Force were retired from the 167th Fighter Squadron, West Virginia Air National Guard.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 28, 2015, 07:12:41 PM
Challenger explodes seconds after liftoff.

Quote
At 11:38 a.m. EST, on January 28, 1986, the space shuttle Challenger lifts off from Cape Canaveral, Florida...Seventy-three seconds later, hundreds on the ground stared in disbelief as the shuttle exploded in a forking plume of smoke and fire. Millions more watched the wrenching tragedy unfold on live television. There were no survivors.

A very sad day.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on January 28, 2015, 07:16:43 PM
Henry VIII dies.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jim on January 28, 2015, 07:37:03 PM
Challenger explodes seconds after liftoff.

Quote
At 11:38 a.m. EST, on January 28, 1986, the space shuttle Challenger lifts off from Cape Canaveral, Florida...Seventy-three seconds later, hundreds on the ground stared in disbelief as the shuttle exploded in a forking plume of smoke and fire. Millions more watched the wrenching tragedy unfold on live television. There were no survivors.

A very sad day.

For the generation of my parents, the Kennedy assassination was a life memory. For my generation, this lift-off explosion is a life memory. Sadly, the footage of the twin towers is another. In both, I vividly recall details of where I was / what I was doing.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: xsrider on January 28, 2015, 11:26:55 PM
January 28: In 1964, Stanley Kubrick's nuclear war satire "Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb" premiered in New York, Toronto and London.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 29, 2015, 06:32:03 AM
January 29, 1915,
In the Argonne region of France, German lieutenant Erwin Rommel leads his company in the daring capture of four French block-houses, the structures used on the front to house artillery positions.

Rommel crept through the French wire first and then called for the rest of his company to follow him. When they hung back after he had repeatedly shouted his orders, Rommel crawled back, threatening to shoot the commander of his lead platoon if the other men did not follow him. The company finally advanced, capturing the block-houses and successfully combating an initial French counter-attack before they were surrounded, subjected to heavy fire and forced to withdraw.

Rommel was awarded the Iron Cross, First Class, for his bravery in the Argonne; he was the first officer of his regiment to be so honored. "Where Rommel is, there is the front", became a popular slogan within his regiment. The bravery and ingenuity he displayed throughout the Great War, even in light of the eventual German defeat, led to Rommel's promotion through the ranks of the army in the post-war years.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 30, 2015, 06:48:13 AM
Happy Birthday Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882)

Elected to an unprecedented four presidential terms, Roosevelt guided the US through the Great Depression and World War II. He instituted the New Deal program to promote economic recovery and social reform and, as war spread in Europe, prepared for the possibility that the US would enter the war. When it finally did, he led the nation to the threshold of victory, dying in office less than a month before Germany's surrender to the Allies. What quote about fear is attributed to FDR?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 30, 2015, 06:57:49 AM
1901   Women Prohibitionists smash 12 saloons in Kansas.

Oh, the humanity!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on January 30, 2015, 09:03:48 AM
Today, in 1968, the Tet Offensive was launched throughout South Vietnam. The North Vietnamese Army launched a wave of attacks in the late night hours of 30 January in the I and II Corps Tactical Zones of South Vietnam. This early attack did not lead to widespread defensive measures. When the main North Vietnamese operation began the next morning the offensive was countrywide and well coordinated, eventually more than 80,000 North Vietnamese and VietCong troops striking more than 100 towns and cities, including 36 of 44 provincial capitals, five of the six autonomous cities, 72 of 245 district towns, and the southern capital. The offensive was the largest military operation conducted by either side up to that point in the war.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 30, 2015, 09:12:27 AM
Jan. 30, 1973,
After recently changing their name from Wicked Lester, Gene Simmons, Paul Stanley, Ace Frehley and Peter Criss made their first appearance as Kiss at the Popcorn Club in Queens, New York.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on January 30, 2015, 01:40:08 PM
What quote about fear is attributed to FDR?

"The only thing we have to fear is those nasty little centipede thingies down in the basement.   Eeech - I HATE those things!!"

-- FDR
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on January 30, 2015, 01:50:34 PM
http://youtu.be/64PWxzW5vZU (http://youtu.be/64PWxzW5vZU)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on January 31, 2015, 05:28:05 AM
Jan. 31, 1969
Led Zeppelin played the first of two nights at The Fillmore East, New York City during the band's first North American tour. Porter's Popular Preachers opened the night, then Led Zeppelin took the stage. It is alleged that Zeppelin's show was so powerful and got such an enthusiastic audience that headliners Iron Butterfly refused to follow them.
http://youtu.be/OVzKVxee6IY (http://youtu.be/OVzKVxee6IY)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on January 31, 2015, 08:47:24 AM
1606   Guy Fawkes is hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Gunpowder Plot, an attempt to blow up Parliament.

Jan. 31, 1969
Led Zeppelin played the first of two nights at The Fillmore East, New York City during the band's first North American tour. Porter's Popular Preachers opened the night, then Led Zeppelin took the stage. It is alleged that Zeppelin's show was so powerful and got such an enthusiastic audience that headliners Iron Butterfly refused to follow them.
[url]http://youtu.be/OVzKVxee6IY[/url] ([url]http://youtu.be/OVzKVxee6IY[/url])


Talk about getting hit by a Freight train. :bigsmile:

 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 31, 2015, 11:31:54 AM
Private Slovik Executed for Desertion (1945)

US Army private Eddie Slovik was executed for desertion in 1945. His was the first such execution after the Civil War and the only one of 49 World War II desertion death sentences to be carried out. Slovik was initially separated from his unit during an artillery attack. He rejoined them but deserted after being assigned to the front lines. He later confessed in writing that he would do it again and refused offers to destroy his note and return to battle. How old was Slovik when he died?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Mr. Whippy on January 31, 2015, 12:42:18 PM
1606   Guy Fawkes is hanged, drawn and quartered for his part in the Gunpowder Plot, an attempt to blow up Parliament.

Jan. 31, 1969
Led Zeppelin played the first of two nights at The Fillmore East, New York City during the band's first North American tour. Porter's Popular Preachers opened the night, then Led Zeppelin took the stage. It is alleged that Zeppelin's show was so powerful and got such an enthusiastic audience that headliners Iron Butterfly refused to follow them.
[url]http://youtu.be/OVzKVxee6IY[/url] ([url]http://youtu.be/OVzKVxee6IY[/url])


Talk about getting hit by a Freight train. :bigsmile:


There's a Wiki page about that tour.  Apparently it wasn't just one performance that Iron Butterfly refused.  Same was true for Country Joe and the Fish on the west coast, apparently.  That must have been something amazing.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Led_Zeppelin_North_American_Tour_1968%E2%80%931969 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Led_Zeppelin_North_American_Tour_1968%E2%80%931969)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on January 31, 2015, 02:45:21 PM
I would agree with Mr Wimpy.  Led Zeppelin is something special.  I still enjoy listening to them.


Nauru Independence Day (2015)

This island in the Pacific Ocean gained independence from Great Britain on January 31, 1968. It had been governed by Australia. Independence Day is a national holiday in Nauru.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 01, 2015, 06:29:39 AM
 2003- the space shuttle Columbia breaks up while entering the atmosphere over Texas, killing all seven crew members on board.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 01, 2015, 06:33:25 AM
Feb. 1, 1911,
Thomas Jennings was found guilty with the first use of fingerprint evidence in the U.S. He was convicted at the Criminal Court of Cook County for killing Clarence B. Hiller. Upon appeal, 21 Dec 1911, the Illionis Supreme Court ruled the evidence was admissible. Two months later, Jennings was executed on 16 Feb 1912.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 02, 2015, 07:57:18 AM
1494   Columbus begins the practice using Indians as slaves.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 02, 2015, 09:34:04 AM
Feb. 2, 1942,
Born on this day, Graham Nash, guitarist, singer with The Hollies who he left in 1968. Became a member of Crosby Stills Nash & Young who had the 1969 UK No.17 single 'Marrakesh Express' and 1970 US No.1 album 'Deja Vu'.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on February 02, 2015, 06:38:00 PM
The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Guadalupe_Hidalgo) is signed ending the Mexican-American War. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican%E2%80%93American_War)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 03, 2015, 10:33:19 AM
Feb. 3, 1998
A U.S. Marine EA-6B Prowler jet flying low over the town of Cavalese in the Italian Alps severs a ski-lift cable, sending a tram crashing to the ground and killing 20 people.
The anti-radar aircraft sliced right through the steel cable holding up the tram and it plunged more than 250 feet to the ground. Everyone on board was killed instantly.

The plane suffered minimal damage and returned to its base in Italy. The pilot, Captain Richard J. Ashby, and navigator, Captain Joseph Schweitzer, destroyed a videotape that had recorded their flight before an investigation began. Still, it was soon discovered that the plane had been flying at only 360 feet above the ground, in spite of regulations that set the minimum altitude for flights at 2,000 feet. This revelation spurred large anti-American protests in Italy. President Bill Clinton apologized to the victims' families and promised compensation, but, pursuant to NATO rules, the U.S. military claimed jurisdiction over the case, despite objections from Italian prosecutors.

In a military court at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, Ashby and Schweitzer were charged with involuntary manslaughter and negligent homicide. They claimed that their equipment had malfunctioned and that their maps had not shown the location of the ski-lift. Despite Italian claims that American pilots regularly and intentionally ignored safety regulations to execute risky maneuvers, the crew was acquitted in March 1999. Ashby and Schweitzer were court-martialed for obstruction of justice for their destruction of the videotape and dismissed from the Marines.

In May 1999, Congress failed to approve a compensation fund for the victims. Italy, however, later approved nearly $2 million dollars in compensation per victim, and, according to NATO regulations, the United States was held liable for 75 percent of the damages.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 03, 2015, 12:25:20 PM
The 15th amendment was approved.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on February 03, 2015, 03:31:27 PM
The 15th amendment was approved.
It was ratified too.
But it should have been ratified on Feb 2nd.  That's when GA was the required twenty-eighth ratification of  the thirty-seven states.
Iowa  ratified it on Feb 3rd. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on February 03, 2015, 11:51:48 PM
F'n Iowa.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 04, 2015, 06:23:48 AM
Confederate States of America Established (1861)


Although Abraham Lincoln had stated his willingness to tolerate slavery where it currently existed, his election as US president precipitated the secession of several Southern states. South Carolina, the first to secede, was soon followed out of the Union by Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas. On February 4, 1861, delegates from the seceding states met in Alabama to organize a provisional government. Who was elected president of the Confederate States of America?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Confederate+States+of+America (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Confederate+States+of+America)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 04, 2015, 06:32:03 AM
Feb. 4, 1896,
Black American inventor, Willie H. Johnson, of Navasota, Texas, was issued a U.S. patent for "A Mechanism for Overcoming Dead Centers" which occur in machines when a shaft is driven by a crank (No. 554,223). The essential part of his invention consisted of a two-part or compound crank-rod of such construction that the members automatically locked together at the proper point in the stroke, so as to act as a single rod, and at other intervals of its travel would automatically unlocked, so that each member would act independently of the other. Either could act to carry the stroke past the top dead center of the other.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 05, 2015, 07:36:27 AM
Hydrogen Bomb Lost in the Ocean (1958)

The Tybee Bomb is a 7,600-pound (3,500-kg) nuclear bomb containing 400 pounds (180 kg) of conventional high explosives and highly enriched uranium. During a simulated combat mission, the B-47 bomber carrying it collided with an F-86 fighter plane, and the bomb was jettisoned and lost. It is presumed to be somewhere in Wassaw Sound, off the shores of Georgia's Tybee Island, but recovery efforts have been unsuccessful. In 2004, a retired air force pilot made what discovery in the case?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on February 05, 2015, 09:01:27 AM
Who was elected president of the Confederate States of America?


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 05, 2015, 02:53:28 PM
I should have added this.

http://youtu.be/VdphvuyaV_I (http://youtu.be/VdphvuyaV_I)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 05, 2015, 07:47:46 PM
Feb. 5, 1960
Twenty-seven year old  Jesse Belvin, who scored a 1956 hit with 'Goodnight, My Love', was killed in a car accident in Hope, Arkansas. His wife and the car's driver also died of their injuries. The three were trying to make a fast get-a-way from the first ever mixed race audience concert in the town of Little Rock, after threats had been made against Belvin's life.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 06, 2015, 05:52:26 AM
Feb. 6, 1917
Just three days after U.S. President Woodrow Wilson's speech of February 3, 1917—in which he broke diplomatic relations with Germany and warned that war would follow if American interests at sea were again assaulted—a German submarine torpedoes and sinks the Anchor Line passenger steamer California off the Irish coast.

The SS California departed New York on January 29 bound for Glasgow, Scotland, with 205 passengers and crewmembers on board. Eight days later, some 38 miles off the coast of Fastnet Island, Ireland, the ship's captain, John Henderson, spotted a submarine off his ship's port side at a little after 9 a.m. and ordered the gunner at the stern of the ship to fire in defense if necessary. Moments later and without warning, the submarine fired two torpedoes at the ship. One of the torpedoes missed, but the second torpedo exploded into the port side of the steamer, killing five people instantly. The explosion of the torpedo was so violent and devastating that the 470-foot, 9,000-ton steamer sank just nine minutes after the attack. Despite desperate S.O.S. calls sent by the crew to ensure the arrival of rescue ships, 38 people drowned after the initial explosion, for a total of 43 dead.

This type of blatant German defiance of Wilson's warning about the consequences of unrestricted submarine warfare, combined with the subsequent discovery and release of the Zimmermann telegram—an overture made by Germany's foreign minister to the Mexican government involving a possible Mexican-German alliance in the event of a war between Germany and the U.S.—drove Wilson and the United States to take the final steps towards war. On April 2, Wilson went before Congress to deliver his war message; the formal declaration of U.S. entrance into the First World War came four days later.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 06, 2015, 10:55:24 AM
Waitangi Day (2015)

A national public holiday in New Zealand, February 6 commemorates the signing of the 1840 Treaty of Waitangi, in which the Maori natives agreed to coexist peacefully with the European settlers. It was not observed as a public holiday outside the North Island until it became New Zealand Day in 1973. It was observed as such until 1976, when it again became known as Waitangi Day. Waitangi is located on the Bay of Islands at the northern end of the North Island, and the day on which the treaty was signed is observed there by the Royal New Zealand Navy and the Maoris each year. More... Discuss
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 06, 2015, 10:56:30 AM
Singapore Established as a Trading Post (1819)

A trading center as early as the 14th century, Singapore was later part of Johor, a region of the southern Malay Peninsula. In 1819, the island of Singapore was ceded to the British East India Company, and the city was founded the same year by Sir Thomas Raffles. Under Raffles' direction, Singapore developed a vital role in the lucrative China trade. Today, the city is one of the world's biggest ports. The earliest known settlement on the island of Singapore was referred to by what name?

answer here
http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Singapore (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Singapore)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Stickman on February 06, 2015, 11:07:56 AM
You all have heard of the Great Chicago Fire.  Did you know about the Big Baltimore Blaze of ’04?  As the many citizens of Charm City lay their heads to rest on this day (night) in 1904, little did they know what they would face the next day.  On February 7, 1904, a small fire in the business district of downtown Baltimore is wind-whipped into an uncontrollable conflagration that engulfs a large portion of the city by evening. The fire is believed to have been started by a discarded cigarette in the basement of the Hurst Building. When the blaze finally burned down after 31 hours, an 80-block area of the downtown area, stretching from the waterfront to Mount Vernon on Charles Street, had been destroyed. More than 1,500 buildings were completely leveled, and some 1,000 severely damaged, bringing property loss from the disaster to an estimated $100 million (in current dollars it would be too ridiculous to estimate). Miraculously, no homes or lives were lost, and Baltimore's domed City Hall, built in 1867, was preserved.  The Great Baltimore Fire was the most destructive fire in the United States since the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 destroyed most of the city and caused an estimated $200 million in property damge.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 06, 2015, 06:27:47 PM
 :clap:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 07, 2015, 06:03:19 AM
Feb. 7, 1981
A Tupolev Tu-104 airliner belonging to the Soviet Pacific Fleet and carrying its top brass on the return from  staff maneuvers in Leningrad crashes on take-off at a military airfield in Pushkin, Leningrad oblast. Out of 52 aboard, including 16 generals and admirals and 20 captains, 51 are pronounced dead at the scene, and the co-pilot later dies in hospital from his injuries. Admiral Emil Spiridonov, Fleet's CO, was among the killed. The reason was later determined to be the improper loading of the plane, with a part of the cargo, two huge rolls of book paper, unsecured and shifting during the take-off, causing a wingstrike.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 07, 2015, 06:13:32 AM
1964   The British band The Beatles are greeted by 25,000 fans upon their arrival in the United States at JFK Airport.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 07, 2015, 11:22:38 AM
Ice Worm Festival (2015)


This zany mid-winter festival celebrates the emergence of the ice worm in Cordova, Alaska. The highlight of the three-day festival is the procession of a 150-foot-long ice worm followed by 500 or so paraders. Other events include variety shows, ski events, a survival-suit race, a beauty pageant, music, and dances. The celebration began in 1961, and the legend was born then that an ice worm hibernates during the winter in the Cordova Glacier but starts to hatch or wake up in early February. The worm has gained international fame, and the festival draws great crowds of people.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jim on February 07, 2015, 11:46:24 AM
From the fire loss post above...

Losses, adjusting for inflation / current value via
http://www.davemanuel.com/inflation-calculator.php (http://www.davemanuel.com/inflation-calculator.php)

1904 Big Baltimore Blaze $100 million loss

$100,000,000 of 1904 dollars would be worth: $2,631,578,947.37 in 2014
$100,000,000 of 2014 dollars would be worth $3,800,000.00 in 1904

1871 Great Chicago Fire $200 million loss

$200,000,000 of 1871 dollars would be worth: $3,846,153,846.15 in 2014
$200,000,000 of 2014 dollars would be worth $10,400,000.00 in 1871
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 07, 2015, 01:47:25 PM
Singapore Established as a Trading Post (1819)

A trading center as early as the 14th century, Singapore was later part of Johor, a region of the southern Malay Peninsula. In 1819, the island of Singapore was ceded to the British East India Company, and the city was founded the same year by Sir Thomas Raffles. Under Raffles' direction, Singapore developed a vital role in the lucrative China trade. Today, the city is one of the world's biggest ports. The earliest known settlement on the island of Singapore was referred to by what name?

answer here
[url]http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Singapore[/url] ([url]http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Singapore[/url])


Stamford Raffles. Despite the Wiki spelling, it's usually Johore. I was born there. In the British Military Hospital. The tales from the Chinese who were under Japanese occupation were chilling. So were the tales of the Army prisoners. There were so many ghosts of dead soldiers there. It was Britain's biggest ever military defeat. Poor leadership, poor preparation, unblodded and under equipped troops.

Igrew up in the middle of the so-called Malayan Emergency. The number of dead Malays I saw is forver scarred in my brain. Once, we were going up country, as a family, for a picnic. The Standard Vanguard had bullet proof armour, There was a loory load of Ghurkas behind, with a macine gun on the top of the cab. We went through a Malay village-all the children came running up to the car and the adults waved and smiled. We came back 4 hours later. They had al been killed. About 400 people.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: squeezer on February 07, 2015, 02:04:05 PM
Jeebus, Papa. How old were you when you saw that?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 07, 2015, 02:18:50 PM
Jeebus, Papa. How old were you when you saw that?

4. At 6, I was trained to shoot. I killed my first man at 7.

I hate guns.

Sorry for breaking the internet.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jim on February 07, 2015, 04:07:21 PM
That's a bit of history...

While I am curious as to the issue at age 7, I shan't ask (an no need to stir your memory bank to put it into type)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 08, 2015, 03:28:20 AM
That's a bit of history...

While I am curious as to the issue at age 7, I shan't ask (an no need to stir your memory bank to put it into type)

The man was made of paper and wearing a German helmet. I hit my first target! Sorry for the deliberate wind up.  ;D
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on February 08, 2015, 09:51:00 AM
The man was made of paper and wearing a German helmet.

So they DID bomb Pearl Harbor!!  :wow:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jim on February 08, 2015, 10:51:31 AM
The man was made of paper and wearing a German helmet. I hit my first target! Sorry for the deliberate wind up.  ;D

pfew!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 09, 2015, 06:18:03 AM
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Adolf "Dolfo" Joseph Ferdinand Galland died this day, 9 February 1996.
He was a German Luftwaffe general and flying ace who served throughout the Second World War in Europe. He flew 705 combat missions, and fought on the Western and the Defence of the Reich fronts. On four occasions he survived being shot down, and he was credited with 104 aerial victories, all of them against the Western Allies.
He often butted heads with Reichsmarschall Hermann Göring , eventually being relieved of command. He eventually returned to active duty, and finished the war flying the potent, new Me262.
He became a highly successful businessman and aviation consultant after the war, and befriended many renowned Allied aces.
His is an incredibly interesting biography.
More here:
http://acesofww2.com/germany/aces/galland/ (http://acesofww2.com/germany/aces/galland/)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 09, 2015, 04:36:36 PM
William G. Morgan Invents Volleyball (1895)

William G. Morgan invented volleyball in Holyoke, Massachusetts, just four years after basketball was invented in the neighboring town of Springfield. Morgan, a physical education director, created "Mintonette" for older athletes who wanted to play indoor sports but deemed basketball too rough. The name volleyball came from the nature of the game: "volleying" a ball back and forth over a net. Players can also “spike” the ball and drive it downward into the opponents' court. What is a "pancake”?

They must have needed something to do when it was snowing.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 09, 2015, 04:37:55 PM
Papa did you ever win at this?

Hurling the Silver Ball (2015)

St. Ia (or Eia or Ives) is the patron saint of St. Ives, Cornwall. St. Ives celebrates Feast Monday on the Monday after the Feast of St. Ia (February 3), by playing an ancient game known as hurling, using a ball made of cork encased in silver. The mayor begins the game by tossing the ball against the side of the parish church. The game stops promptly at 12 noon, and whoever has the ball in his or her possession at that time receives a cash prize or a medal. The festivities continue in the afternoon with more sporting events and a municipal ball in the evening.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: squeezer on February 10, 2015, 02:53:39 AM
On Feb. 10, 2015, Chloe Moretz turned 18, ending a long running pedophilia scandal on several sport-touring related chat boards.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on February 10, 2015, 03:20:12 AM
On Feb. 10, 2015, Chloe Moretz turned 18, ending a long running pedophilia scandal on several sport-touring related chat boards.

 :rolf:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 10, 2015, 06:23:25 AM
General Tom Thumb Marries Lavinia Warren (1863)

General Tom Thumb, born Charles Sherwood Stratton, began touring with circus pioneer P.T. Barnum in 1843 at the tender age of four. Stratton's short stature—he was a mere 3 feet, 4 inches (102 cm) tall when he died—and his comedic impersonations made him an international hit. His courtship of Lavinia Warren, another one of Barnum's performers, led to a fashionable New York City wedding in 1863, and the pair was later received at the White House. Stratton died in 1883. What marks his grave?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 10, 2015, 06:38:33 AM
Feb. 10, 1902
Deceased today, Francis Pratt, American mechanical engineer and manufacturer of machine tools. In 1855 he produced the "Lincoln" milling machine which used a screw drive to improve on F.W. Howe's earlier rack and pinion design. Pratt formed a partnership with Amos Whitney in1860 and together developed the system of interchangeable parts that had been pioneered by Samuel Colt, Elisha Root, Amos' cousin Eli Whitney, and others. This, in turn, led to the need to establish national standards of measurement. The Pratt & Whitney Company was incorporated in 1869, making various types of gauges to enable such standards in manufacturing, making machine tools and tools particularly for the armament industry.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on February 10, 2015, 07:15:20 AM
On Feb. 10, 2015, Chloe Moretz turned 18, ending a long running pedophilia scandal on several sport-touring related chat boards.

 :rolf:

 :hail: :rolf:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 10, 2015, 08:25:08 AM
1863   P.T. Barnum's star midgets, Tom Thumb and Lavinia Warren, are married.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 11, 2015, 11:46:17 AM
On Feb. 11, 1942,
An unprecedented sight of a vast German armada of warships ploughed its way directly through the English Channel in a bold act of defiance. In broad daylight, the battleships Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, together with the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen and an escort of some fifty smaller warships sailed through rough seas to return to Germany. Overhead, struggling through low cloud and drizzle, was an expertly coordinated umbrella of fighter cover as approximately 280 Luftwaffe fighters kept a constant watch on their maritime brethren, ensuring that no fewer than 32 fighters would ever be overhead the Kreigsmarine force. Directing this aerial cover was none other than legendary fighter ace Adolf Galland.

Shortly after 1.30pm, through the drizzle, mist and murk, appeared a single squadron of Spitfires to face the combined onslaught of German warships and fighters. Below them, heading south from the English coast, was a sight which not a single German witness could ever have anticipated, a sight which Galland himself called nothing short of ‘death-defying courage’ – a single formation of six Swordfish biplanes under the command of Lt Cdr Eugene Esmonde were going to attempt to stop the German battleships.

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A great read at:
http://warthunder.com/en/news/2599-ace-of-the-month-lt-cdr-eugene-esmonde-en (http://warthunder.com/en/news/2599-ace-of-the-month-lt-cdr-eugene-esmonde-en)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 11, 2015, 01:08:02 PM
Papa did you ever win at this?

Hurling the Silver Ball (2015)

St. Ia (or Eia or Ives) is the patron saint of St. Ives, Cornwall. St. Ives celebrates Feast Monday on the Monday after the Feast of St. Ia (February 3), by playing an ancient game known as hurling, using a ball made of cork encased in silver. The mayor begins the game by tossing the ball against the side of the parish church. The game stops promptly at 12 noon, and whoever has the ball in his or her possession at that time receives a cash prize or a medal. The festivities continue in the afternoon with more sporting events and a municipal ball in the evening.

Never played it. But the game still lives.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: xsrider on February 11, 2015, 08:54:46 PM
February 11, 1990   
South African political leader Nelson Mandela is released from prison in Paarl, South Africa, after serving more than 27 years of a life sentence.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 12, 2015, 06:45:24 AM
Feb. 12, 2009
Colgan Air Flight 3407, a Bombardier Dash 8 Q400, flying from Newark Liberty International in New Jersey to Buffalo Niagara International Airport in New York crashes into a house in Clarence, New York at 10:17 pm local time; all 49 aboard the plane are killed, with one fatality on the ground.
The subsequent inquiry became an indictment of grey-market aviation practice.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on February 12, 2015, 07:29:16 AM
February 12, 1985

The pizza saver is patented. (http://worldwide.espacenet.com/publicationDetails/biblio?CC=US&NR=4498586&KC=&FT=E&locale=en_EP)

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 (http://s51.photobucket.com/user/pak714/media/pizzasaver_zpsbfe2f719.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on February 12, 2015, 12:29:36 PM
February 12, 1985

The pizza saver is patented. ([url]http://worldwide.espacenet.com/publicationDetails/biblio?CC=US&NR=4498586&KC=&FT=E&locale=en_EP[/url])

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 ([url]http://s51.photobucket.com/user/pak714/media/pizzasaver_zpsbfe2f719.jpg.html[/url])



Now this is a red letter date.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on February 12, 2015, 09:38:34 PM
February 12, 1985

The pizza saver is patented. ([url]http://worldwide.espacenet.com/publicationDetails/biblio?CC=US&NR=4498586&KC=&FT=E&locale=en_EP[/url])

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 ([url]http://s51.photobucket.com/user/pak714/media/pizzasaver_zpsbfe2f719.jpg.html[/url])


Do you mean the Barbie table?   :bigok:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 13, 2015, 05:02:22 AM
Feb. 13, 1961
Frank Sinatra launched his own record label, Reprise Records, in order to allow more artistic freedom for his own recordings. Hence, he garnered the nickname “The Chairman of the Board.” One of the label’s founding principles under Sinatra’s leadership was that each artist would have full creative freedom, and at some point complete ownership of their work; including publishing rights. Reprise later became the home of many influential US acts such as Neil Young, Jimi Hendrix, Joni Mitchell, Randy Newman and The Beach Boys.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 13, 2015, 07:17:53 AM
1949   A mob burns a radio station in Ecuador after the broadcast of H.G. Wells' "War of the Worlds."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 13, 2015, 09:08:09 AM
Peter Gabriel was born today back in 1950

Gabriel is an English singer and songwriter who first rose to fame as the lead vocalist and flutist of the progressive rock group Genesis. In the 1970s and 80s, he became an influential solo artist, producing music videos with groundbreaking special effects and writing the soundtrack for Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ. What song did Gabriel perform at the opening ceremonies of the Winter Olympics in Torino, Italy, on February 10, 2006?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 13, 2015, 09:08:45 AM
Last Original Peanuts Strip Is Printed (2000)

With 355 million readers in 75 countries at the peak of its popularity, Charles Schulz's Peanuts is one of the most beloved comic strips in the history of the medium. Among its principal characters are Charlie Brown, a gentle, puzzled boy, usually failing but always persevering; Lucy, his bossy, know-it-all friend; Linus, a philosophical tyke with a security blanket; and Snoopy, a romantic, self-deluded beagle. When Schulz created the strip in 1950, it had a different title. What was it?

http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Peanuts (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Peanuts)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on February 13, 2015, 09:23:47 AM
Last Original Peanuts Strip Is Printed (2000

Ah yes - the infamous "Rabid Snoopy" one.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 13, 2015, 03:53:26 PM
I thought it was the one where Marcie got to eat Peppermint Patty. :leghump:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 14, 2015, 05:54:27 AM
Feb. 14, 496 A.D.
Feast of Lupercalia was a pagan festival of love. On these occasions, the names of young women were placed in a box, from which they were drawn by the men as chance directed. In 496 AD, Pope Gelasius the Dick-Headed, decided to put an end to the Feast of Lupercalia, and he declared that February 14 be celebrated as St Valentine's Day.
Men have struggled to get some on this day since.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 14, 2015, 07:51:28 AM
1929   Chicago gang war between Al Capone and George "Bugs" Moran culminates with several Moran confederates being gunned down in the St. Valentine's Day Massacre.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 15, 2015, 07:03:42 AM
Feb. 15, 1758
Mustard was first advertised for sale in America, by Benjamin Jackson who had set up business in Globe Mills, Germantown, Philadelphia, selling mustard packed in glass bottles with his label on them. In the Philadelphia Chronicle, Penn., he claimed to be "the original establisher of the mustard manufactory in American, and ... at present, the only manufacturer on the continent," and that he had brought the art with him from London to America. In his further advertisements he said he "Prepares the genuine Flour of Mustard-seed, of all Degrees of Fineness, in a Manner that renders it preferable to the European, ...and it will keep perfectly good any reasonable Time, even in the hottest Climates, and is not bitter when fresh made."
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 16, 2015, 06:39:55 AM
1940   The British destroyer HMS Cossack rescues British seamen from a German prison ship, the Altmark, in a Norwegian fjord.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on February 16, 2015, 07:04:16 AM
1940   The British destroyer HMS Cossack rescues British seamen from a German prison ship, the Altmark, in a Norwegian fjord.

Must have been some high quality genetics in there!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 16, 2015, 12:26:57 PM
...rescues British seamen from a German prison ship...


Must have been some high quality genetics in there!

[snerk]![/snerk]

Born 16 Feb 1843,
Henry Martyn Leland,
American inventor and industrialist who founded Cadillac Motors (22 Aug 1902) to build the Cadillac, the first automobile with high-precision, fully-interchangable parts. Earlier in his life, he had learned precision toolmaking making rifles during the Civil War, invented the first mechanical barber's clippers, and made engines for Oldsmobiles. When Leland designed an improved engine, but Olds did not want to adopt it, Leland started Cadillac to build his own own brand of automobile. He eventually sold the company to Will Durant's General Motors Co. During WW I, he formed a new company to manufactured aircraft engines, which, after the war, produced a new automobile: the Lincoln. That company was bought by Henry Ford.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 17, 2015, 06:50:44 AM
1909   Apache chief Geronimo dies of pneumonia at age 80, while still in captivity at Fort Sill, Oklahoma.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 17, 2015, 10:23:05 AM
Feb. 17, 1993
Death of Johann “Hans” Baur, German WWI flying ace (six victories). During the '30s, he became an airliner pilot and Adolf Hitler’s personal pilot, flying the Ju52, and Focke-Wulf 200.
From 1939 to 1945, Baur rose to become a SS Generaloberst. He was captured by the Russians at war's end and spent ten years in the Siberian gulag. He survived having a gangrenous leg amputated by a dental technician virtually without anesthetic.
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Left to right:
Hitler, Generalfeldmarschall Erich von Manstein, Hans Baur and the Luftwaffe Generalfeldmarschall Wolfram von Richthofen at Zaporozh'ye, Ukraine (HQ Army Group South).
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 17, 2015, 04:24:12 PM

Kasparov Beats Deep Blue (1996)


Garry Kasparov is a chess grandmaster and one of the strongest players in history. He was the youngest person to become the World Chess Federation's World Chess Champion, a title he held from 1985 until 1993. In 1996, Kasparov played against a super-computer called "Deep Blue," which was capable of evaluating 100 billion positions each turn. He lost the first game, but rebounded in the next five games to beat the machine. What happened when Kasparov faced the computer in a rematch a year later?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 18, 2015, 05:35:27 AM
Feb. 18, 2003
After cutting a hole in a perimeter fence at Brussels Airport outside Brussels, Belgium, eight armed and masked men dressed as police officers drive in two vehicles displaying flashing blue lights onto the tarmac and confront guards loading a cargo of diamonds onto Helvetic Airways Flight LX789, a Fokker 100 passenger jet packed with passengers and preparing for departure for a flight to Zurich, Switzerland. They steal 120 small packages containing a combined $50,000,000 worth of diamonds in a three-minute robbery and escape via the same hole in the fence without firing a shot.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 18, 2015, 07:23:10 AM
1945   U.S. Marines storm ashore at Iwo Jima.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 18, 2015, 08:09:40 AM
Pluto Is Discovered (1930)

Pluto was discovered by the astronomer Clyde Tombaugh at the Lowell Observatory in Arizona while he was searching for "Planet X," a hypothetical planet that was believed to exist beyond Neptune. Pluto was long regarded as a planet, but following the discovery of other, larger Kuiper belt objects, astronomers recognized the need to reclassify Pluto. In 2006, the International Astronomical Union ended official recognition of Pluto as a planet. What is Pluto's current classification?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Stickman on February 18, 2015, 08:25:43 AM
And the Oscar goes to???  On this day in 1929 The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announces the winners of the first Academy Awards. It was a far cry from the suspense, glamour and endless "stuff" surrounding the Oscars today: The first award recipients’ names were printed on the back page of the academy’s newsletter. A few days later, Variety published the information--on page seven. Spearheaded by movie mogul Louis B. Mayer, the Academy was organized in May 1927 as a non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement and improvement of the film industry. The first awards went to movies produced in 1927 and 1928. Though the announcements were made in February 1929, the actual awards weren’t given out until May 16, 1929. The first Academy Award winners received gold statuettes designed by art director Cedric Gibbons and sculpted by George Stanley. The Academy’s first president, the silent film actor Douglas Fairbanks, handed out the statuettes to the winners, who included Janet Gaynor for Best Actress (for three different films: Seventh Heaven, Street Angel and Sunrise) and the German-born Emil Jannings (The Last Command and The Way of All Flesh). Best Picture honors went to Wings, the World War I drama directed by William Wellman. In the second year of its awards, the Academy changed its policy and began releasing the names of each year’s winners to the press at 11 p.m. on the night of the awards ceremony. This practice ended in 1940 after the Los Angeles Times broke from tradition and published the results in its evening edition, which meant they were revealed before the ceremony. The Academy subsequently instituted a system of sealed envelopes, which remains in use today. The awards weren’t nicknamed “Oscars” until 1931, when a secretary at the Academy noted the statue’s resemblance to her Uncle Oscar, and a journalist printed her remark. The awards were broadcast on radio until 1953, when the first televised Oscars program aired. Since then, the Academy Awards have become one of the world’s most watched television events, drawing as many as 1 billion viewers worldwide. The person to host the most ceremonies?  That would be comedian Bob Hope who presided over the ceremony a total of some 20 times.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on February 18, 2015, 08:37:14 AM

What is Pluto's current classification?

Dwarf planet. 


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 18, 2015, 10:26:18 AM
What is Pluto's current classification?



Quote from: jadziadax8
Dwarf planet.


Dog Star.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 18, 2015, 10:34:48 AM
Feb. 18, 1814,
The Treaty of Ghent, signed on December 24, 1814 in the Flemish city of Ghent, was the peace treaty that ended the War of 1812 between the United States of America and the United Kingdom AND CANADA.
It was unanimously ratified by the US senate only on today's late date, due to the poor internet communications in America at the time.
Two hundred years later, we've still got your back.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on February 18, 2015, 10:51:40 AM
Feb. 18, 1814,
The Treaty of Ghent, signed on December 24, 1814 in the Flemish city of Ghent, was the peace treaty that ended the War of 1812 between the United States of America and the United Kingdom AND CANADA.
It was unanimously ratified by the US senate only on today's late date, due to the poor internet communications in America at the time.
Two hundred years later, we've still got your back.
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I thought after this was signed Canada went back to British rule?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 18, 2015, 04:36:25 PM
I thought after this was signed Canada went back to British rule?

The Constitution Act, 1867, originally known as the British North America Act (BNA Act) was the law passed by the British Parliament creating the Dominion of Canada at Confederation.
But not until March 29th, when I would likely have posted it.
 :bigsmile:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 19, 2015, 12:56:40 PM
Feb. 18, 1814,
The Treaty of Ghent, signed on December 24, 1814 in the Flemish city of Ghent, was the peace treaty that ended the War of 1812 between the United States of America and the United Kingdom AND CANADA.
It was unanimously ratified by the US senate only on today's late date, due to the poor internet communications in America at the time.
Two hundred years later, we've still got your back.
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Yup, and after the treaty was signed, we tried to take St Louis and got trounced. But then, neither side knew the war was over.

There are still items looted by us from the White House (before we burned it down) turning up.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 19, 2015, 05:50:22 PM
The Sun is the center of the solar system :willy: :willy: :willy: :willy:

Happy Birthday!!!!
Nicolaus Copernicus (1473)

Copernicus was a church canon, physician, and economist, but his most important work was in the field of astronomy. He developed the heliocentric theory of the universe that placed the Sun, not the Earth, at the center of our solar system and helped launch a scientific revolution. Though Copernicus conceived his revolutionary model of planetary motion by 1530, his treatise on the subject did not see print until he was on his deathbed in 1543. What heliocentric hypotheses preceded Copernicus's?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 19, 2015, 06:03:10 PM
Anniversary of the Bombing of Darwin


On February 19, 1942, Japanese bomber and fighter planes conducted a devastating air raid on the town of Darwin, the capital city of Australia's Northern Territory. As a tribute to honor the dead and those who defended Darwin, an annual commemoration is held in Bicentennial Park by the Cenotaph, a monument to those slain in World War I. At 9:58 AM, the exact time the attack began, a World War II air raid siren sounds. During some observances, Australian regiments will reenact the attack: ground units fire their guns, and fighter planes perform fly-bys over the memorial site.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on February 19, 2015, 06:51:45 PM
February 19, 1942.

Executive Order 9066 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_9066)


Quote
Executive Order 9066 is a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by the United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942, authorizing the Secretary of War to prescribe certain areas as military zones. Eventually, EO 9066 cleared the way for the deportation of Japanese Americans, Italian Americans, and German Americans to internment camps. The executive order was spurred by a combination of war hysteria and reactions to the Niihau Incident.




Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on February 19, 2015, 07:19:13 PM
February 19, 1942.

Executive Order 9066 ([url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_9066[/url])


Quote
Executive Order 9066 is a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by the United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942, authorizing the Secretary of War to prescribe certain areas as military zones. Eventually, EO 9066 cleared the way for the deportation of Japanese Americans, Italian Americans, and German Americans to internment camps. The executive order was spurred by a combination of war hysteria and reactions to the Niihau Incident.



Interesting:
Quote
The Niʻihau Incident (or Battle of Niʻihau) occurred on December 7, 1941, when Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service pilot Shigenori Nishikaichi crash-landed his Zero on the Hawaiian island of Niʻihau after participating in the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was killed in a struggle with people on the island.

The island's Native Hawaiian residents were initially unaware of the attack, but apprehended Nishikaichi when the gravity of the situation became apparent. Nishikaichi then sought and received the assistance of three locals of Japanese descent in overcoming his captors, finding weapons, and taking several hostages. Eventually, Nishikaichi was killed by Niihauans Benehakaka "Ben" Kanahele and Kealoha "Ella" Kanahele;[1] Ben Kanahele was wounded in the process, and one of Nishikaichi's confederates, Yoshio Harada, committed suicide.

The incident and the actions of Nishikaichi's abettors contributed to a sense in the American military that every Japanese, even those who were American citizens or otherwise thought loyal to the United States, might aid Japan; this ultimately may have influenced the decision to intern Japanese Americans during World War II. Ben Kanahele was decorated for his part in stopping the incident; Ella Kanahele received no official recognition.[1]
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on February 19, 2015, 07:26:24 PM
February 19, 1942.

Executive Order 9066 ([url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_9066[/url])


Quote
Executive Order 9066 is a United States presidential executive order signed and issued during World War II by the United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on February 19, 1942, authorizing the Secretary of War to prescribe certain areas as military zones. Eventually, EO 9066 cleared the way for the deportation of Japanese Americans, Italian Americans, and German Americans to internment camps. The executive order was spurred by a combination of war hysteria and reactions to the Niihau Incident.



Interesting:
Quote
The Niʻihau Incident (or Battle of Niʻihau) occurred on December 7, 1941, when Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service pilot Shigenori Nishikaichi crash-landed his Zero on the Hawaiian island of Niʻihau after participating in the attack on Pearl Harbor. He was killed in a struggle with people on the island.

The island's Native Hawaiian residents were initially unaware of the attack, but apprehended Nishikaichi when the gravity of the situation became apparent. Nishikaichi then sought and received the assistance of three locals of Japanese descent in overcoming his captors, finding weapons, and taking several hostages. Eventually, Nishikaichi was killed by Niihauans Benehakaka "Ben" Kanahele and Kealoha "Ella" Kanahele;[1] Ben Kanahele was wounded in the process, and one of Nishikaichi's confederates, Yoshio Harada, committed suicide.

The incident and the actions of Nishikaichi's abettors contributed to a sense in the American military that every Japanese, even those who were American citizens or otherwise thought loyal to the United States, might aid Japan; this ultimately may have influenced the decision to intern Japanese Americans during World War II. Ben Kanahele was decorated for his part in stopping the incident; Ella Kanahele received no official recognition.[1]



I agree. It is very interesting. Perhaps they were intentionally put there generations before.  :confused:


 :rolf:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on February 19, 2015, 11:50:10 PM
Right here in our backyard...

Feb 19th, 1847 -Rescuers finally reach the ill-fated Donner Party in the Sierra Nevada near present-day Truckee, CA.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 20, 2015, 06:38:34 AM
1962   Mercury astronaut John Glenn becomes the first American to orbit the Earth.





















Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 20, 2015, 10:09:33 AM
Go get some firecrackers!!!


Chinese New Year Spring Festival (2015)
The Lunar New Year is the most important and the longest of all Chinese festivals, celebrated by Chinese communities throughout the world. Dragon and lion dances are performed, and there are acrobatic demonstrations and much beating of gongs. An ancient custom is giving red packets of money called hung-pao or lai see to children. In most Asian countries, people return to work after the fourth or fifth day of celebration. In Taiwan, New Year's Eve, New Year's Day, and the two days following are public holidays—government offices and most businesses are closed.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on February 20, 2015, 12:14:09 PM
Right here in our backyard...

Feb 19th, 1847 -Rescuers finally reach the ill-fated Donner Party in the Sierra Nevada near present-day Truckee, CA.


I knew it was bad, but I just read this article on the Donner Party, and reaffirmed how bad it was.

:-(

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donner_Party_timeline (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donner_Party_timeline)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 20, 2015, 02:44:05 PM
Feb. 20, 2003,
100 people died after pyrotechnics ignited a club during a gig by Great White in West Warwick, Rhode Island. Great White singer Ty Longley was also killed in the accident. Two brothers who owned the club were charged, along with the former tour manager with involuntary manslaughter. Foam soundproofing material at the edge of the stage set alight and the blaze spread quickly in the one-storey wooden building as fans all tried to escape through the same exit.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: motormike on February 20, 2015, 03:00:33 PM
Kurt Cobain would have been 48 today.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on February 20, 2015, 05:15:58 PM
Who?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on February 20, 2015, 05:38:50 PM
That would be Keith Moon.

Both are still dead however.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 20, 2015, 08:14:48 PM
Whadda coincidence.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 21, 2015, 04:22:29 AM
That's just spooky. Both of them still dead. Must be Mossad or the CIA.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 21, 2015, 06:01:19 AM
Feb. 21, 1849
Born this day, Édouard Gaston (Daniel) Deville was a French-Canadian surveyor of Canadian lands (1875-1924) who perfected the first practical method of photogrammetry, or the making of maps based on photography. His system used projective grids of images taken from photographs made with a camera and theodolite mounted on the same tripod. Photographs were taken from different locations, at precise predetermined angles, with measured elevations. Each photograph slightly overlapped the preceding one. With enough photographs and points of intersection, a map could be prepared, including contour lines. He also invented (1896) the first stereoscopic plotting instrument called the Stereo-Planigraph.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on February 21, 2015, 05:58:33 PM
Malcolm X was assassinated 50 years ago today.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 22, 2015, 07:34:12 AM
Feb. 22, 1819
Spanish minister Do Luis de Onis and U.S. Secretary of State John Quincy Adams sign the Florida Purchase Treaty, in which Spain agrees to cede the remainder of its old province of Florida to the United States.
In what was at the time, an incredibly radical plan of social engineering, the Yanks began infilling the entire peninsula as a residence for the elderly, known as God's Waiting Room.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 23, 2015, 05:23:51 AM
Feb. 23, 2008
A Northrop-Grumman B-2A Spirit, 89-0127, 'WM', "Spirit of Kansas", of the 393rd Bomb Squadron, 509th Bomb Wing, Whiteman AFB, Missouri, crashed shortly after takeoff from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam. Both pilots ejected from the plane before it crashed.
It is the first operational loss of a B-2, and would be the most expensive write-off in history, as each B-2 rings up to around $1.2 billion. The cause of the crash is later determined to have been moisture in the air-data pressure sensors, producing inaccurate speed readings and then an early rotation and subsequent stall.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 23, 2015, 06:40:03 AM
1954   Mass innoculation begins as Salk's polio vaccine is given to children for first time.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on February 23, 2015, 07:05:27 AM
1954   Mass innoculation begins as Salk's polio vaccine is given to children for first time.

2017, the earths population is wiped out by diseases that were thought to be gone but had a resurgence due to the stupidity of self entitled helicopter parents.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 23, 2015, 07:15:57 AM
Cuba Leases Guantánamo Bay to the United States (1903)

The city of Guantánamo is located in southeast Cuba. Founded in the early 19th century by French colonists from Haiti, it is well known today as the home of the US Guantánamo Bay Naval Base, which has installations covering roughly 45 sq mi (116 sq km). The site was leased to the US in 1903, but the Cuban government has refused since 1960 to accept the token annual rent of $5,000 from the US and has pressured for the surrender of the base. What was established at the base in 2002?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on February 23, 2015, 11:38:44 AM
Feb.  23rd 1685 - George Frederic Handel born. The first of three major composers born that year.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on February 23, 2015, 12:13:27 PM
Cuba Leases Guantánamo Bay to the United States (1903)

The city of Guantánamo is located in southeast Cuba. Founded in the early 19th century by French colonists from Haiti, it is well known today as the home of the US Guantánamo Bay Naval Base,

<snip>

What was established at the base in 2002?

In 'n Out Burger?
Walmart?
Starbucks?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 24, 2015, 06:37:51 AM
Feb. 24, 1969
After a North Vietnamese mortar shells rocks their Douglas AC-47 gunship, Airman First Class John L. Levitow throws himself on an activated, smoking magnesium flare, drags himself and the flare to the open cargo door, and tosses it out of the aircraft just before it ignites. For saving his fellow crewmembers and the gunship, Airman Levitow was later awarded the Medal of Honor. He was one of only two enlisted airmen to win the Medal of Honor for service in Vietnam and was one of only five enlisted airmen ever to win the medal.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 24, 2015, 07:38:19 AM
Cuba Leases Guantánamo Bay to the United States (1903)

The city of Guantánamo is located in southeast Cuba. Founded in the early 19th century by French colonists from Haiti, it is well known today as the home of the US Guantánamo Bay Naval Base,

<snip>

What was established at the base in 2002?

In 'n Out Burger?
Walmart?
Starbucks?

Come on I thought everyone knew it was a Hooters and a STO clubhouse.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 24, 2015, 08:58:12 AM
1944   Merrill's Marauders, a specially trained group of American soldiers, begin their ground campaign against Japan into Burma.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on February 24, 2015, 09:16:49 AM
Feb. 24, 1969
After a North Vietnamese mortar shells rocks their Douglas AC-47 gunship, Airman First Class John L. Levitow throws himself on an activated, smoking magnesium flare, drags himself and the flare to the open cargo door, and tosses it out of the aircraft just before it ignites. For saving his fellow crewmembers and the gunship, Airman Levitow was later awarded the Medal of Honor. He was one of only two enlisted airmen to win the Medal of Honor for service in Vietnam and was one of only five enlisted airmen ever to win the medal.
As a 20 yr enlisted veteran of the USAF, I'm quite familiar with A1C Levitow.
Flak had severely damaged his aircraft - All members in the cargo compartment were wounded. The aircraft sustained more than 3,500 fragment holes in the fuselage and a two-foot-wide hole in the right wing. The fuselage was a jumble of spilled ammunition.
A1C Levitow had more than 40 shrapnel wounds in his back and legs.

Levitow was the lowest ranking airman in history to earn the Medal of Honor.

After his Air Force service, Levitow spent 22 years devoted to veterans affairs, and later worked in Connecticut developing and designing veteran programs.
The Levitow Honor Graduate Award is presented to the top professional military education graduate from Air Force Airman Leadership Schools. (Which I attended)
The 737th Training Group Headquarters building at Lackland Air Force Base TX was named in his honor.
Air Mobility Command named a C-17 Globemaster III after him in 1998; "The Spirit of Sgt. John L. Levitow". The first to be named for an enlisted person.

He died on Nov. 8, 2000, at age 55 after a lengthy battle with cancer.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: motormike on February 24, 2015, 10:25:55 AM
Today in 1980, the U.S.A. Olympic hockey team won the Gold Medal in Lake Placid, NY.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on February 24, 2015, 11:45:02 AM
Steve Jobs born in 1955.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on February 24, 2015, 07:17:20 PM
Today in 1980, the U.S.A. Olympic hockey team won the Gold Medal in Lake Placid, NY.

I watched it in my folk's bedroom on our failed-color green and white TV.  It was awesome. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 24, 2015, 10:11:15 PM
God damn kids. Bitchin about the color tv losing one or two of its colors. You know when i was a kid we were damn lucky to even see a fucking tv let a lone have one in our own home.  And yes for you smart asses we did walk uphill both ways to school and back in 10 feet of snow in the summer.   A loaf of bread cost a nickle and that took all day to earn.  :gerg:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 24, 2015, 10:13:02 PM
And get off of my lawn you little fuckers.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on February 24, 2015, 11:20:55 PM
Today in 1980, the U.S.A. Olympic hockey team won the Gold Medal in Lake Placid, NY.

I watched it in my folk's bedroom on our failed-color green and white TV.  It was awesome.

We had a TV like that, it was black and purple. Like watching everything in UV night vision.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 25, 2015, 06:00:28 AM
Feb. 25, 1616
Minutes of the Inquisition recorded that following the judgment by the Farher Theologians against the opinions of the mathematician Galileo on the heliocentric model, Pope Paul V ordered Cardinal Bellarmine to summon Galileo and in person, warn him to abandon his assertion that the earth moves around the sun. If Galileo were to refuse, an injunction would be issued that he should abstain completely from teaching, defending or discussing the doctrine. Further, if Galileo should not acquiesce, he would be imprisoned. The next day, 26 Feb 1616, Galileo was ordered by Bellarmine “to give up altogether the false doctrine... and if you should refuse.. you should be imprisoned.” Given such a choice, Galileo made a renouncement, but he knew that would not change the real facts of the Earth's motion.
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 (http://s138.photobucket.com/user/FatiredFlyer/media/smiley-inquisition_zps7770a963.gif.html)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on February 25, 2015, 06:40:50 AM
Samuel Colt patents his revolver, the first black U.S. senator takes his seat, Muhammad Ali wins his first heavyweight title, and Ferdinand Marcos flees the Philippines, my sister was born, all on this day.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 26, 2015, 06:28:41 AM
Feb. 26, 1979
Production of the A-4 Skyhawk ends after 26 years, with the delivery of the 2,690th and final aircraft to the United States Marine Corps.
"Scooter"
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 26, 2015, 06:57:26 AM
1993   A bomb rocks the World Trade Center in New York City. Five people are killed and hundreds suffer from smoke inhalation.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 26, 2015, 08:17:53 AM
Radar Is Demonstrated (1935)

Radar is a means for detecting the position, movement, and nature of a remote object through radio waves reflected from its surface. During the 1930s, several countries independently developed the technology for military use, exploiting radar's capacity to detect aircrafts and ships. One of the earliest practical radar systems was devised by Sir Robert Watson-Watt, a Scottish physicist and descendent of the inventor of the steam engine, James Watt. What was the "Battle of the Beams"?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 26, 2015, 08:19:18 AM
Samuel Colt patents his revolver, the first black U.S. senator takes his seat, Muhammad Ali wins his first heavyweight title, and Ferdinand Marcos flees the Philippines, my sister was born, all on this day.

Does your sister know you are telling people that she is as old as the Colt Revolver?





 :couch:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on February 26, 2015, 10:40:05 AM
Samuel Colt patents his revolver, the first black U.S. senator takes his seat, Muhammad Ali wins his first heavyweight title, and Ferdinand Marcos flees the Philippines, my sister was born, all on this day.

Does your sister know you are telling people that she is as old as the Colt Revolver?





 :couch:

She's cool. It's fine.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 26, 2015, 06:48:48 PM
She's cool. It's fine.
They all say that...
 :inlove:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on February 27, 2015, 07:48:05 AM
Feb 27 1827, a group of masked and costumed students dance through the streets of New Orleans, Louisiana, marking the beginning of the city's now famous Mardi Gras celebrations.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 27, 2015, 03:20:38 PM
David H. Hubel (1926)


In 1981, neurobiologist David Hubel and his research partner, Torsten Wiesel, received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their research in the area of visual perception and their discoveries concerning information processing in the visual system. Their observations of the various nerve impulses and nerve cells responsible for different types of visual stimuli opened the door for the understanding and treatment of what ailments?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on February 27, 2015, 05:10:49 PM
2015: Leonard Nimoy dies.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on February 27, 2015, 07:40:37 PM
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on February 28, 2015, 03:35:52 AM

Feb 28, 1953: Watson and Crick discover chemical structure of DNA
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on February 28, 2015, 05:53:58 AM
RIP SPOCK


Happy Birthday

Mario Andretti (1940)

Mario Andretti is the only racecar driver to have won the Indianapolis 500, the Daytona 500, and the international Formula One championship. He retired from Indy-car racing in 1994 with 52 victories but continued his attempts to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans sports-car endurance race until the age of 60. The Italian-American legend has been called the "Driver of the Century." How many members of the Andretti family have followed in Mario's footsteps and become racecar drivers?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on February 28, 2015, 07:07:37 AM
1967   In Mississippi, 19 are indicted in the slayings of three civil rights workers.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on February 28, 2015, 03:46:38 PM
Feb. 28, 1970
Led Zeppelin played a gig in Copenhagen as The Nobs after Eva Von Zeppelin a relative of the airship designer threatened to sue if the family name was used in Denmark.
Whatta Nob!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 01, 2015, 05:58:19 AM
Mar. 1, 1692
Quote
In Salem Village in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Sarah Goode, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba, an Indian slave from Barbados, are charged with the illegal practice of witchcraft. Later that day, Tituba, possibly under coercion, confessed to the crime, encouraging the authorities to seek out more Salem witches.

Trouble in the small Puritan community began the month before, when nine-year-old Elizabeth Parris and 11-year-old Abigail Williams, the daughter and niece, respectively, of the Reverend Samuel Parris, began experiencing fits and other mysterious maladies. A doctor concluded that the children were suffering from the effects of witchcraft, and the young girls corroborated the doctor's diagnosis. With encouragement from a number of adults in the community, the girls, who were soon joined by other "afflicted" Salem residents, accused a widening circle of local residents of witchcraft, mostly middle-aged women but also several men and even one four-year-old child. During the next few months, the afflicted area residents incriminated more than 150 women and men from Salem Village and the surrounding areas of Satanic practices.

In June 1692, the special Court of Oyer, "to hear," and Terminer, "to decide," convened in Salem under Chief Justice William Stoughton to judge the accused. The first to be tried was Bridget Bishop of Salem, who was found guilty and executed by hanging on June 10. Thirteen more women and four men from all stations of life followed her to the gallows, and one man, Giles Corey, was executed by crushing. Most of those tried were condemned on the basis of the witnesses' behavior during the actual proceedings, characterized by fits and hallucinations that were argued to be caused by the defendants on trial.

In October 1692, Governor William Phipps of Massachusetts ordered the Court of Oyer and Terminer dissolved and replaced with the Superior Court of Judicature, which forbade the type of sensational testimony allowed in the earlier trials. Executions ceased, and the Superior Court eventually released all those awaiting trial and pardoned those sentenced to death. The Salem witch trials resulted in the executions of 19 innocent women and men
.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on March 01, 2015, 06:51:56 AM

Mar. 1, 1692
Quote
In Salem Village in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Sarah Goode, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba, an Indian slave from Barbados, are charged with the illegal practice of witchcraft. Later that day, Tituba, possibly under coercion, confessed to the crime, encouraging the authorities to seek out more Salem witches.

Trouble in the small Puritan community began the month before, when nine-year-old Elizabeth Parris and 11-year-old Abigail Williams, the daughter and niece, respectively, of the Reverend Samuel Parris, began experiencing fits and other mysterious maladies. A doctor concluded that the children were suffering from the effects of witchcraft, and the young girls corroborated the doctor's diagnosis. With encouragement from a number of adults in the community, the girls, who were soon joined by other "afflicted" Salem residents, accused a widening circle of local residents of witchcraft, mostly middle-aged women but also several men and even one four-year-old child. During the next few months, the afflicted area residents incriminated more than 150 women and men from Salem Village and the surrounding areas of Satanic practices.

In June 1692, the special Court of Oyer, "to hear," and Terminer, "to decide," convened in Salem under Chief Justice William Stoughton to judge the accused. The first to be tried was Bridget Bishop of Salem, who was found guilty and executed by hanging on June 10. Thirteen more women and four men from all stations of life followed her to the gallows, and one man, Giles Corey, was executed by crushing. Most of those tried were condemned on the basis of the witnesses' behavior during the actual proceedings, characterized by fits and hallucinations that were argued to be caused by the defendants on trial.

In October 1692, Governor William Phipps of Massachusetts ordered the Court of Oyer and Terminer dissolved and replaced with the Superior Court of Judicature, which forbade the type of sensational testimony allowed in the earlier trials. Executions ceased, and the Superior Court eventually released all those awaiting trial and pardoned those sentenced to death. The Salem witch trials resulted in the executions of 19 innocent women and men
.

And now they walk freely among us. What has happened to this world??


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on March 01, 2015, 07:07:06 AM

Mar. 1, 1692
Quote
In Salem Village in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Sarah Goode, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba, an Indian slave from Barbados, are charged with the illegal practice of witchcraft. Later that day, Tituba, possibly under coercion, confessed to the crime, encouraging the authorities to seek out more Salem witches.

Trouble in the small Puritan community began the month before, when nine-year-old Elizabeth Parris and 11-year-old Abigail Williams, the daughter and niece, respectively, of the Reverend Samuel Parris, began experiencing fits and other mysterious maladies. A doctor concluded that the children were suffering from the effects of witchcraft, and the young girls corroborated the doctor's diagnosis. With encouragement from a number of adults in the community, the girls, who were soon joined by other "afflicted" Salem residents, accused a widening circle of local residents of witchcraft, mostly middle-aged women but also several men and even one four-year-old child. During the next few months, the afflicted area residents incriminated more than 150 women and men from Salem Village and the surrounding areas of Satanic practices.

In June 1692, the special Court of Oyer, "to hear," and Terminer, "to decide," convened in Salem under Chief Justice William Stoughton to judge the accused. The first to be tried was Bridget Bishop of Salem, who was found guilty and executed by hanging on June 10. Thirteen more women and four men from all stations of life followed her to the gallows, and one man, Giles Corey, was executed by crushing. Most of those tried were condemned on the basis of the witnesses' behavior during the actual proceedings, characterized by fits and hallucinations that were argued to be caused by the defendants on trial.

In October 1692, Governor William Phipps of Massachusetts ordered the Court of Oyer and Terminer dissolved and replaced with the Superior Court of Judicature, which forbade the type of sensational testimony allowed in the earlier trials. Executions ceased, and the Superior Court eventually released all those awaiting trial and pardoned those sentenced to death. The Salem witch trials resulted in the executions of 19 innocent women and men
.

And now they walk freely among us. What has happened to this world??


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

 :rolf:  ^Well done sir.  Well done.   :lol:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 01, 2015, 07:10:58 AM
Whuppity Scoorie (2015)

On March 1 every year, Lanark's parish church bell rings exactly at 6 p.m., after a four-month silence. As the bell begins to ring, children in this Scottish town parade three times round the church, dangling pieces of string with paper balls attached at the other end. Then they start striking one another with the paper balls in a play fight. Once pennies are tossed to the ground, the children rush to collect them. One explanation for the origin of this festival is that it can be traced back to pagan times, when people believed that making a great deal of noise would scare away evil spirits.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 01, 2015, 07:17:51 AM
And now they walk freely among us. What has happened to this world??

We became desensitized after the appearance of witches on popular TV, beginning in 1964.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on March 01, 2015, 07:20:05 AM
Oh the fantasies, I mean memories. Yeah, memories. That's the ticket.


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on March 01, 2015, 07:21:17 AM
Cookie's having another 60's flash back.
Title: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on March 01, 2015, 07:22:37 AM
I was born in '60 numbnutz. I didn't start tripping until '71.


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 02, 2015, 05:31:40 AM
Mar. 2, 2008,
Canadian guitarist, singer, Jeff Healey, died of cancer. Healey lost his sight to retinoblastoma, a rare cancer of the eyes when he was eight months old, resulting in his eyes being surgically removed. After living cancer-free for 38 years, he developed sarcoma in his legs. Despite surgery for this, the sarcoma spread to his lungs and ultimately was the cause of his death. Healey released over 12 albums, presented a long running radio show and worked with many artists including Stevie Ray Vaughan, Buddy Guy, BB King, ZZ Top & Eric Clapton.
RIP...
http://youtu.be/2eA5w51hMRg (http://youtu.be/2eA5w51hMRg)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 02, 2015, 05:37:39 AM
Wilt Chamberlain's 100-Point Game (1962)

Recognized as one of the National Basketball Association's greatest players of all time, Wilt Chamberlain led the league in scoring for 7 seasons and in rebounding 11 times, was named the NBA's Most Valuable Player 4 times, and was elected to basketball's Hall of Fame. However, he is perhaps best known for being the only player in league history to score 100 points in a single game—a feat he achieved while playing for the Philadelphia Warriors. How many total points were scored in that game?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 02, 2015, 05:38:08 AM

Dr. Seuss (1904)


Theodor Seuss Geisel, popularly known by his pen name, Dr. Seuss, was a famous American writer and cartoonist. His outlandishly illustrated books captivate readers with their unique blend of whimsy, zany humor, and catchy verse. He is best known for his children's books, which include enduring classics like The Cat in the Hat, Green Eggs and Ham, and How the Grinch Stole Christmas!. How has the pronunciation of "Seuss" changed since Geisel first adopted the pseudonym?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 02, 2015, 06:34:25 AM
March 2, 1836 Texas declares independence from Mexico.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 02, 2015, 06:38:54 AM
Lou Reed born in 1942.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 02, 2015, 06:44:55 AM
1974   A grand jury in Washington, D.C. concludes that President Nixon was indeed involved in the Watergate cover-up.

Slow news day.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 03, 2015, 08:17:54 AM
1999   Former White House intern Monica Lewinsky appears on national television to explain her affair with President Bill Clinton.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: bomber on March 03, 2015, 08:32:02 AM
And Mitch Ryder re-releases "Devil in the Blue Dress."

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 03, 2015, 10:57:47 AM
March 3, 2005
Steve Fossett becomes the first person to fly an airplane around the world solo nonstop without refueling, flying 25,000 miles in 67 hours and 2 minutes in the Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 03, 2015, 02:59:15 PM
ring Ring.

Alexander Graham Bell (1847)
Bell was a scientist and inventor. He patented the telephone in 1876 and months later sent his now-famous telephone message to his assistant, Thomas A. Watson: "Mr. Watson, come here; I want to see you." Bell also invented a device that transmitted sound in rays of light, a machine that tested hearing and detected auditory deficiencies, and an apparatus capable of locating metallic objects in the human body. This last device was hurriedly assembled in an attempt to find a bullet in whose body?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: motormike on March 03, 2015, 04:51:03 PM
Today in 1986 (29 years ago)...."Master of Puppets" album by Metallica was released.

\m/  \m/
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 03, 2015, 06:18:00 PM
....This last device was hurriedly assembled in an attempt to find a bullet in whose body?

jfk
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 04, 2015, 08:09:49 AM
1908   The New York board of education bans the act of whipping students in school.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on March 04, 2015, 08:13:40 AM
....This last device was hurriedly assembled in an attempt to find a bullet in whose body?

jfk
AL
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 04, 2015, 09:40:50 AM
Mar. 4, 1986,
After just completing a two set show with The Band in Winter Park, Florida, 41 year old Richard Manuel of The Band hung himself from a shower curtain rod in a hotel room in Florida. His band mate, Robbie Robertson honoured his friend with the song, 'Fallen Angel' in 1987.
RIP.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on March 04, 2015, 11:40:00 AM
This last device was hurriedly assembled in an attempt to find a bullet in whose body?

J.R.'s

Alexander Graham Bell (1847)and months later sent his now-famous telephone message to his assistant, Thomas A. Watson: "Mr. Watson, come here; I want to see you."

Actually he said "Mr. Watson come here, I want you"; and he is credited with having made the very first obscene phone call.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 04, 2015, 12:56:56 PM
It was a president and what did bell invent?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 04, 2015, 01:20:57 PM
...what did bell invent?
Peppers?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 04, 2015, 05:07:11 PM
...what did bell invent?
Peppers?

definitely weather
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on March 04, 2015, 09:39:47 PM
It was a president and what did bell invent?
J.G, the metal detector?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 05, 2015, 06:10:30 AM
1946   In Fulton, Missouri, Winston Churchill tells a crowd that "an iron curtain has descended on the Continent [of Europe]."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 05, 2015, 06:24:04 AM
Mar. 5, 1982,
Actor and singer John Belushi died from an overdose of cocaine and heroin. Belushi was one of the original cast members on US TV's Saturday Night Live, played Joliet 'Jake' Blues in The Blues Brothers and also appeared in the film Animal House. His tombstone reads "I may be gone, but rock n roll lives on."
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 05, 2015, 06:43:13 AM
 :cry:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on March 05, 2015, 07:23:52 AM
:cry:

+1.  I miss Chris Farley in the same way- he was that guy for my generation I think.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on March 05, 2015, 08:42:47 AM
1963  The hula-hoop is patented.
It was already on the market, since 1958.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 06, 2015, 05:25:41 AM
Mar. 6, 1961,
George Formby died aged 57. The British singing comedian and ukulele player made over 20 films, and his best known song is 'Leaning On A Lamp Post.' Formby who was made an OBE in 1946 was a major influence on George Harrison.
http://youtu.be/vEymZ3rXOmc (http://youtu.be/vEymZ3rXOmc)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 06, 2015, 06:42:12 AM
Happy Birthday David Gilmour.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 06, 2015, 07:41:44 AM
1857   The Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision holds that blacks cannot be citizens.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 06, 2015, 08:10:18 AM
Most likely the greatest inventor in history was born on this date.


Michelangelo (1475)
Among the world's most celebrated artists, Michelangelo was one of the foremost figures of the Renaissance. The marble David, completed before his 30th birthday, is a sculptural masterpiece, and his paintings in the Sistine Chapel are among the most influential frescoes in the history of Western art. A true "Renaissance man," he also was an architect and poet and wrote hundreds of sonnets and madrigals. Where in the Sistine Chapel is there a disguised self-portrait of Michelangelo?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on March 06, 2015, 08:37:10 AM
Where in the Sistine Chapel is there a disguised self-portrait of Michelangelo?

Men's room.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 06, 2015, 04:54:27 PM
Feast of Excited Insects
 



Feast of Excited Insects

On or around March 5
Known as Kyongchip or Gyeongchip in Korea and as Ching Che in China, the Feast of Excited Insects marks the transition from winter to spring. It is the day when the insects are said to come back to life after hibernating all winter. In China, it is the day when "the dragon raises his head," summoning the insects back to life, and people perform various rituals designed to prepare for the onslaught and begin the task of restoring fertility to the earth. In Korea, this is one of 24 days in the lunar calendar that marks the beginning of a new season. Farmers prepare their fields and begin planting their barley, cabbage, and other vegetables.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on March 07, 2015, 01:51:28 AM
1857   The Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision holds that blacks cannot be citizens.

One of the downsides of the American Rebellion.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 07, 2015, 06:25:30 AM
 March 7, 1961
The # 2 North America X-15 became the first manned aircraft to exceed Mach 4 when pilot Capt. Robert M. White reached a speed of 2,905 mph which, at the altitude of 77,450 ft, he achieved Mach 4.43.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 08, 2015, 06:48:49 AM
Mar. 8, 1968
Cream played the first of two nights at the Winterland Ballroom, San Francisco, California. The concert was recorded with some tracks ending up on their 'Wheels Of Fire' double album.
http://youtu.be/SVkHUlSVgY0 (http://youtu.be/SVkHUlSVgY0)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 09, 2015, 05:35:01 AM
Mar. 9, 1964   The first Ford Mustang rolls off the Ford assembly line.
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The first Mustang sold, is still with its original owner.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 09, 2015, 06:32:48 AM
1967   Svetlana Alliluyeva, Josef Stalin's daughter defects to the United States.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on March 09, 2015, 02:53:08 PM
Barbie comes out  1959

(the) Barbie doll went on display at the American Toy Fair in New York City.

Eleven inches tall, with a waterfall of blond hair, Barbie was the first mass-produced doll in the United States with adult, woman  features.
The woman behind Barbie was Ruth Handler, who co-founded Mattel, Inc. with her husband in 1945. After seeing her young daughter ignore her baby dolls to play make-believe with paper dolls of women, Handler realized there was an important niche in the market for a doll that allowed girls to imagine the future.

Barbie’s appearance was modeled on a doll named Lilli, based on a German comic strip character. Originally marketed as a racy gag gift to adult men in tobacco shops, the Lilli doll later became extremely popular with children. Mattel bought the rights to Lilli and made its own version, which Handler named after her daughter, Barbara.
With its sponsorship of the “Mickey Mouse Club” TV program in 1955, Mattel became the first toy company to broadcast commercials to children.
Despite criticism of unrealistic and/or negative body image, sales of Barbie-related merchandise continued to soar, topping 1 billion dollars annually by 1993.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 10, 2015, 06:08:19 AM
Mar. 10, 1966   The North Vietnamese capture a Green Beret camp at Ashau Valley. How ironic;
Barry Saddlers "Green Berets" was #1 on the charts that week...
Incredible story here:
http://www.army.mil/article/132963/Grueling_38_hour_struggle_in_jungle_leads_to_Medal_of_Honor (http://www.army.mil/article/132963/Grueling_38_hour_struggle_in_jungle_leads_to_Medal_of_Honor)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on March 10, 2015, 10:12:37 AM
1876 - First time human voice is transmitted by telephone
Alexander Graham Bell summoned his assistant in another room with his new invention by saying, “Mr. Watson, come here; I want you.” Bell had received a comprehensive telephone patent just three days before.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 11, 2015, 06:35:29 AM
Born 11 Mar 1915; died 26 Jun 1990 at age 75.
Joseph Carl Robnett “Lick” Licklider was an American computer scientist who created the idea of a universal computer network to easily transfer and retrieve information which his successors developed into the internet. In 1959, in his first book, Libraries of the Future, Licklider expanded Vannevar Bush's idea of an automated library system to describe how computers could distribute library resources from a single database to multiple remote users. In 1962, while director of the Information Processing Techniques Office of the U.S. Dept. of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), he sent a memo to colleagues envisioning a time-sharing network of computers. Subsequently ARPANET was built, which became the model for the Internet. He also was a visionary for human-computer interaction, remembered for his 1960 paper, 'Man-Computer Symbiosis'.
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^All his fault^
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 11, 2015, 08:43:49 AM
1888   A disastrous blizzard hits the northeastern United States. Some 400 people die, mainly from exposure.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 12, 2015, 06:27:18 AM
Mar. 12, 1971,
The Allman Brothers Band played the first of two nights at the Fillmore East, New York. Both shows were recorded and released as The Allman Brothers live double album, which became the groups breakthrough album.
https://youtu.be/w9ZubobGMLs
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 12, 2015, 07:10:08 AM
1945   Diarist Anne Frank dies in a German concentration camp.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 12, 2015, 07:48:48 AM
The Truman Doctrine (1947)
In the early stages of the Cold War, US President Harry Truman sought to protect Turkey and Greece from falling under Soviet influence when the UK announced that it could no longer provide them with aid. The Truman Doctrine, which called for the US to "support free peoples who are resisting attempted subjugation by armed minorities or by outside pressures," shifted US foreign policy to a strategy of Soviet containment. How much money did Congress appropriate in response to Truman's message?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 12, 2015, 09:21:43 PM
Well it was just international womens day and now this.


Girl Scout Day (2015)
This observance marks the anniversary of the founding of the American Girl Scouts by Juliette Gordon Low (1860-1927) in Savannah, Georgia, in 1912. The day is the focal point of Girl Scout Week, which begins on the Sunday before March 12 and is observed by Girl Scout troops nationwide in various ways—with community service projects, anniversary parties, and plays. The 80th anniversary in 1992 was celebrated with various events, including the kick-off of a national service project on the environment.


Make sure you eat a brownie ;D
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 13, 2015, 06:47:39 AM
Mar. 13, 1971,
Brewer and Shipley entered the US singles chart with 'One Toke Over The Line'. The song, which featured The Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia on steel guitar, peaked at No.10 despite being banned by radio stations for its drug references. Brewer and Shipley maintained that the word "toke" meant "token" as in ticket, hence the line "waitin' downtown at the railway station, one toke over the line."
Of course it did. 
 :smoking:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 13, 2015, 07:47:32 AM
Mar. 13, 1971,
Brewer and Shipley entered the US singles chart with 'One Toke Over The Line'. The song, which featured The Grateful Dead's Jerry Garcia on steel guitar, peaked at No.10 despite being banned by radio stations for its drug references. Brewer and Shipley maintained that the word "toke" meant "token" as in ticket, hence the line "waitin' downtown at the railway station, one toke over the line."
Of course it did. 
 :smoking:

According to the Beatles, Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds, had nothing to do with LSD either.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 13, 2015, 07:52:19 AM
1974   The U.S. Senate votes 54-33 to restore the death penalty.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on March 13, 2015, 09:58:54 AM
13 March, 1942 - the Quartermaster Corps (QMC) of the United States Army begins training dogs for the newly established War Dog Program, or “K-9 Corps.”

The most famous dog to emerge from the war was Rin Tin Tin, an abandoned puppy of German war dogs found in France in 1918.  He was taken to the United States, where he made his film debut in the 1922 silent film The Man from Hell’s River. As the first bona fide animal movie star, Rin Tin Tin made the then little-known German Shepherd breed famous across the country.

The top canine hero of World War II was Chips, a German Shepherd who served with the Army’s 3rd Infantry Division. Trained as a sentry dog, Chips broke away from his handlers and attacked an enemy machine gun nest in Italy, forcing the entire crew to surrender. The wounded Chips was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star and the Purple Heart – all of which were later revoked due to an Army policy preventing official commendation of animals.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 14, 2015, 06:44:01 AM
Mar. 14, 1961
Yuba City B-52 crash: Failure of a cabin pressurization system forces USAF Boeing B-52F-70-BW Stratofortress, 57-0166, c/n 464155, to fly low, accelerating fuel-burn, bomber has fuel starvation at 10,000 feet over Yuba City, California, crashes, killing aircraft commander. Two nuclear weapons on board tear loose on impact but no explosion or contamination takes place.
Whew!
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 14, 2015, 10:59:40 AM
First Patient Successfully Treated with Penicillin (1942)

Penicillin was the first antibiotic agent successfully used to treat bacterial infections in humans. Penicillin's effect on bacteria was first observed by biologist Alexander Fleming in 1928, but it was not until 1941 that scientists purified the substance and established that it was both effective in fighting infectious organisms and not toxic to humans. The first successful treatment occurred the next year. Where did scientists find the mold that allowed them to mass produce the drug?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 14, 2015, 11:00:11 AM
Albert Einstein (1879)


Einstein was an intellectual giant of the 20th century whose name has become synonymous with genius. Recognized as one of the greatest physicists of all time, Einstein made countless important contributions to physics, including his theories of relativity, which profoundly revolutionized scientific and philosophical inquiry. In 1921, he received the Nobel Prize for his work on theoretical physics. Though he sought it for decades, Einstein never discovered a unified field theory, which is what?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on March 14, 2015, 11:07:16 AM
First Patient Successfully Treated with Penicillin (1942)

Penicillin was the first antibiotic agent successfully used to treat bacterial infections in humans. Penicillin's effect on bacteria was first observed by biologist Alexander Fleming in 1928, but it was not until 1941 that scientists purified the substance and established that it was both effective in fighting infectious organisms and not toxic to humans. The first successful treatment occurred the next year. Where did scientists find the mold that allowed them to mass produce the drug?

on a piece of bread?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 15, 2015, 06:38:39 AM
Died Mar.15, 1998
Edwin J. Shoemaker
American inventor and engineer who created the recliner chair and started the La-Z-Boy furniture company to manufacture it. He learned some drafting through correspondence school lessons, and by 1925 he held his first patent - a band saw guide. In 1928, he and his cousin Edward M. Knabusch made a reclining porch chair out of some wooden slats. It would automatically reclined as a sitter leaned back. Since it was a seasonal item, his sales prospects improved by adding plush upholstery for year-round indoor use. He planned and designed a manufacturing facility (opened Nov 1941) which utilized the mass-production methods of Detroit's automotive industry. By the 1960s, he created a model incorporated rocking together with reclining.

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Hero of the Male Revolution.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 16, 2015, 05:34:48 AM
Andrew Smith Hallidie
Born 16 Mar 1836;
English-American engineer and inventor who built the cable car system first used on the steep hills of San Francisco streets (1 Aug 1873). Streetcars on rails were fitted with a mechanical device that gripped an underground endless moving cable to travel and released to stop. The cable passed around pulleys and was driven by a large wheel at an engine house. He had learned the business of making wire rope from his father before moving to the U.S. (1853), where he designed and built wire suspension bridges and flumes. He began manufacturing wire rope in 1857. Hallidie also developed a method of moving freight over canyons using an endless wire rope, and inventions for the transmission of power with wire rope, which seeded his idea for cable cars.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 16, 2015, 06:24:09 AM
1621   The first Indian appears to colonists in Plymouth, Massachusetts.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on March 16, 2015, 09:51:52 AM
1621   The first Indian appears to colonists in Plymouth, Massachusetts.

1622: the first Indian reserve is established.


(J/K)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 17, 2015, 06:51:33 AM
Mar. 17, 1845,
A method of manufacturing elastic (rubber) bands was patented in Britain by Stephen Perry and and Thomas Barnabas Daft of London (G.B. No. 13880/1845). In the early 19th century, sailors brought home items made by Central and South American natives from the sap of rubber trees, including footwear, garments and bottles. Around 1820, a Londoner named Thomas Hancock sliced up one of the bottles to create garters and waistbands. By 1843, he had secured patent rights from Charles Macintosh for vulcanized india rubber. Stephen Perry, owner of Messrs Perry and Co,. patented the use of india rubber for use as springs in bands, belts, etc., and also the manufacture of elastic bands by slicing suitable sizes of vulcanized india rubber tube. Vulcanization made rubber stable and retain its elasticity.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 17, 2015, 06:56:58 AM
1959   The Dalai Lama flees Tibet and goes to India.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 17, 2015, 07:54:04 AM
BRUCED!!!!!


Rubber Band Patented (1845)
In 1845, Stephen Perry, a British inventor and businessman, patented what is now a staple office supply—the rubber band. While their intended function is to hold items together, rubber bands have been used in a number of other capacities; they can be wrapped around one another to form a bouncy ball or used as "ammunition" in rubber band guns. Though many modern rubber products are commonly made with synthetic rubber, rubber bands are still primarily manufactured using natural rubber. Why
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: fatiredflyer on March 17, 2015, 09:03:23 AM
Popular subject...


Sent from my iPhone with help from Nichola Tesla and the girls of Playboy.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 17, 2015, 07:59:27 PM

Camp Fire Founders' Day (2015)
The organization originally known as the Camp Fire Girls was founded on March 17, 1910, around the same time that the Boy Scout movement was getting its start in Great Britain. Now it is coeducational and is known as Camp Fire. The organization stresses self-reliance, and membership is divided into five age levels, from Sparks (pre-school) to Horizon (grades 9-12). Interaction with adults is also emphasized as a way of learning about career choices, hobbies, and other interests. Camp Fire's founding is observed by members as part of Camp Fire Boys and Girls Birthday Week.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 17, 2015, 11:01:39 PM
Largest Art Theft in US History (1990)
On March 18, 1990, thieves disguised as police officers broke into Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and stole 13 works of art, including paintings by Vermeer, Rembrandt, Manet, and Degas. The crime, considered the largest art theft in US history, remains unsolved. Due to the strict provisions of Gardner's will, which stipulate that the collection remain unchanged, the paintings' empty frames remain on display in their original locations. What group is suspected of carrying out the heist?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 17, 2015, 11:02:17 PM

Congo National Days (2015)
The Republic of the Congo has two historical holidays in addition to its independence day: the assassination of President Marien Ngouabi on March 18, 1977, and the beginning of the civil war on June 5, 1997, which restored President Denis Sassou-Nguesso to power
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on March 18, 2015, 01:26:04 AM
Largest Art Theft in US History (1990)
On March 18, 1990, thieves disguised as police officers broke into Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and stole 13 works of art, including paintings by Vermeer, Rembrandt, Manet, and Degas. The crime, considered the largest art theft in US history, remains unsolved. Due to the strict provisions of Gardner's will, which stipulate that the collection remain unchanged, the paintings' empty frames remain on display in their original locations. What group is suspected of carrying out the heist?


F'n Cops.   
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 18, 2015, 05:02:03 AM
What group is suspected of carrying out the heist?

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 18, 2015, 05:27:01 AM
March 18, 1998
A Formosa Airlines Saab 340 (B-12255) crashes into the sea, killing all 13 aboard. The Captain decided to depart, despite the known failure of the right-hand main bus. This has a domino effect on several systems, including navigation and flight instruments. With that, the right engine anti-ice start bleed valve being in the open position lead to a 13% torque split between the two engines and a yaw-effect when not compensated for. Poor weather conditions and pilot fatigue (the Captain flew several flights throughout the day already) led to spatial disorientation. Add it all up and the result is a right bank after departure that the pilots do not notice until it is unrecoverable.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 18, 2015, 09:22:09 AM
1922   Mahatma Gandhi is sentenced to six years in prison for civil disobedience in India.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 19, 2015, 06:29:02 AM
Mar. 19,1916   
The First Aero Squadron takes off from Columbus, NM to join Gen. John J. Pershing and his Punitive Expedition against Pancho Villa in Mexico.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 19, 2015, 08:30:17 AM
1687   The French explorer La Salle is murdered in by his own men while searching for the mouth of the Mississippi, along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Stickman on March 19, 2015, 08:34:08 AM
On this day in 1952, the one-millionth Jeep rolled off the assembly line.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: fatiredflyer on March 19, 2015, 10:36:21 AM
It's Wyatt Earp's Bday!


Sent from my iPhone with help from Nichola Tesla and the girls of Playboy.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 19, 2015, 10:41:56 AM
Tuskegee Airmen Activated for Service (1941)
The Tuskegee Airmen, trained at Alabama's Tuskegee Army Air Field during WWII, made up the US military's first African-American flying unit. In 1941, congressional legislation forced the Army Air Corps to create an all-black combat unit, and though the War Department aimed to block its formation by instituting a number of restrictive guidelines for applicants, many qualified for service. In all, these airmen flew 1,578 missions, destroyed 261 enemy aircraft, and were awarded how many medals?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 19, 2015, 10:42:58 AM
"Dr. Livingstone, I Presume?" (1813)
David Livingstone, a Scottish missionary and explorer, was the first European to cross the African continent. Among his many discoveries are the Zambezi River and Victoria Falls. Though he aimed to facilitate the abolition of the slave trade by opening Africa to commerce and missionary stations, he inadvertently contributed to the "Scramble for Africa" instead. He is the subject of the popular quotation, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" Who uttered the famous phrase upon meeting him in 1871?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 19, 2015, 11:23:50 AM
Mr. Peabody?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jay547 on March 19, 2015, 11:49:17 AM
March 19, 1952 an American weather station was established on a floating ice island near the north pole.

https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1368&dat=19520518&id=gPkpAAAAIBAJ&sjid=eBAEAAAAIBAJ&pg=888,6822543&hl=en (https://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1368&dat=19520518&id=gPkpAAAAIBAJ&sjid=eBAEAAAAIBAJ&pg=888,6822543&hl=en)

Captain Brinegar was my dad's uncle.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 20, 2015, 05:38:12 AM
Cool ^^^
 :bigsmile:

Mar. 20, 1968,
Eric Clapton, Neil Young, Richie Furay and Jim Mesina, were arrested in Los Angeles for 'being at a place where it was suspected marijuana was being used.' Clapton was later found innocent, the others paid small fines.
F'n narcs.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 21, 2015, 06:38:52 AM
Bering Sea Ice Golf Classic (2015)
This golfing challenge, played on a six-hole course with bright orange golf balls, takes place on the frozen Bering Sea off Nome, Alaska, at a time when the winds can be gale-strength. Par is 41, but winners have claimed scores as low as 23. Entry fees benefit the Lions Club. The tournament, not a wholly serious affair, coincides with the final days of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race that starts about the first of March and ends in Nome about two weeks later
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 21, 2015, 07:14:14 AM
Mar. 21, 1952
THE generally accepted first Rock n' Roll show!
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Organized by Alan Freed, its most remarkable feature was its mix of black and white musical performers, in a revue intended for a racially mixed audience, at a time when almost all performances, radio stations and record labels were de facto segregated by race.
More tickets were printed than the arena's actual capacity, in part due to counterfeiting, and a printing error(tickets for a follow-up ball were sold with the same date printed after the first had sold out). With an estimated 20,000 individuals trying to crowd into an arena that held slightly more than half that — and worries that a riot might break out as people tried to crowd in — the fire authorities shut down the concert after the first song by opening act Paul "Hucklebuck" Williams ended.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on March 21, 2015, 01:03:36 PM
March 21st 1685,  Johann Sebastian Bach born in Eisenach.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 22, 2015, 07:56:10 AM
1904   The first color photograph is published in the London Daily Illustrated Mirror.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 22, 2015, 08:27:49 AM
Mar. 22, 1984,
Queen filmed the video for ‘I Want To Break Free’ at Limehouse Studio in London, England. Directed by David Mallet, it was a parody of the northern British soap opera Coronation Street with the band members dressed in drag. Guitarist Brian May later said the video ruined the band in America, and was initially banned by MTV in the US.
http://youtu.be/o-Zo4AVL7AE (http://youtu.be/o-Zo4AVL7AE)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 22, 2015, 12:38:58 PM
Great Britain Passes the Stamp Act (1765)
Intended to help pay British debts from the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act established the first direct tax levied on the American colonies. It required all newspapers, pamphlets, legal documents, commercial bills, advertisements, and other papers issued in the colonies to bear a tax stamp. The act was vehemently protested by the colonists, and the Stamp Act Congress—the first significant joint colonial response to any British measure—petitioned for its repeal. How did Parliament respond?


And the government hasn't stopped yet.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on March 22, 2015, 12:47:07 PM
How did Parliament respond?


And the government hasn't stopped yet.


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Truth.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 23, 2015, 05:21:04 AM
Mar. 23,1981       
U.S. Supreme Court upholds a law making statutory rape a crime for men but not women.

 :headscratch: :thumbsdown: :facepalm: :shrug: :nuts: :confused: :mad: :drif: :nono: :fitz:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 24, 2015, 05:42:17 AM
From the "You were HOW high?" file:
Mar. 24, 1973,
During a Lou Reed show in Buffalo, New York, a fan jumped on stage and bit Lou on the bum. The man was thrown out of the theatre and Reed completed the show.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 24, 2015, 06:02:56 AM
1989   The Exxon Valdez oil tanker spills 240,000 barrels of oil in Alaska's Prince William Sound.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 24, 2015, 06:11:18 AM
Abracadabra  Harry Houdini was born today (1874)

Born Erik Weisz, Houdini was an American magician, escape artist, and silent film star famed for his escapes from bonds of every sort—locks, handcuffs, straitjackets, and underwater chests. One of his most notable non-escape illusions was performed in 1918, when he had an elephant vanish onstage. In his later years, he campaigned against magicians and mind readers who claimed supernatural powers and even took aim at Jean-Eugène Robert-Houdin, from whom he derived his name. How did Houdini die?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on March 24, 2015, 07:50:45 AM
How did Houdini die?

Trampled by an elephant.  Sucker came outta nowhere.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 24, 2015, 09:10:27 AM
How did Houdini die?
A punch to the appendix.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 25, 2015, 05:27:10 AM
Mar. 25, 1903,
The Times newspaper reported that the French physicist, Pierre Curie assisted by Marie Curie, communicated to the Academy of Sciences that the recently discovered Radium “possesses the extraordinary property of continuously emitting heat, without combustion, without chemical change of any kind, and without any change to its molecular structure, which remains spectroscopically identical after many months of continuous emission of heat ... such that the pure Radium salt would melt more than its own weight of ice every hour ... A small tube containing Radium, if kept in contact with the skin for some hours ... produces an open sore, by destroying the epidermis and the true skin beneath ... and cause the death of living things whose nerve centres do not lie deep enough to be shielded from their influence.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 25, 2015, 06:31:10 AM
World's First Passenger Railway Begins Service (1807)

In 1804, British Parliament approved the laying of a railway line between Swansea and Oystermouth in South Wales to move limestone from the quarries of Mumbles to Swansea and to the markets beyond. Later renamed the Swansea and Mumbles Railway, the line was approved to carry passengers in 1807. The world's first regular passenger service began that same year and operated in one form or another for more than a century and a half before it was decommissioned. What powered the line's first trains?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 25, 2015, 06:42:44 AM
1969   John Lennon and Yoko Ono stage a bed-in for peace in Amsterdam... :rolleyes:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on March 25, 2015, 08:49:51 AM
What powered the line's first trains?

Horrendous body odor.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 26, 2015, 05:33:55 AM
Mar. 26, 2006,
Readers of Total Guitar magazine voted the guitar solo by Jimmy Page in Led Zeppelin's 'Stairway To Heaven' as the greatest guitar solo of all time. The 1971 track was voted ahead of tracks by Van Halen, Queen, Jimi Hendrix and The Eagles. On the 20th anniversary of the original release of the song, it was announced via US radio sources that the song had logged up an estimated 2,874,000 radio plays - back to back, that would run for 44 years solid.
http://youtu.be/Kfg-7Ca9S_I (http://youtu.be/Kfg-7Ca9S_I)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 26, 2015, 05:40:02 AM
Did Zeppelin make any bad songs?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 26, 2015, 06:45:34 AM
I'm sure there are plenty out there that would debate that, but not in my book.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 26, 2015, 08:32:22 AM
1885   Eastman Film Co. manufactures the first commercial motion picture film.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on March 26, 2015, 11:42:05 AM
Richard 111 was buried. 500 years late.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 26, 2015, 05:58:39 PM
Bangladesh Independence Day

This public holiday celebrates the the declaration of independence of the state of Bangladesh on March 26, 1971. When India gained independence from Britain in 1947, the region that is now Bangladesh became East Pakistan and was governed together with West Pakistan as one country. By early 1971, differences between East and West Pakistan led to war. When India entered the war in November, independence was assured. Bangladeshis observe this national holiday in the capital city of Dhaka with memorial ceremonies, a boat race on the Buriganga River, and other festivities
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 26, 2015, 06:15:04 PM
WTF! No question?!?!?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 27, 2015, 05:38:03 AM
Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (1886)
A pioneer of modern architecture and one of its most influential figures, German-American architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe was famous for his use of the minimalist architectural dictum "less is more." As a young architect in Berlin, he foreshadowed modern architecture with innovative designs for tubular-steel furniture and steel-and-glass skyscrapers, and countless modernist steel-and-glass structures have been influenced by his work. Mies was also known for using what other famous aphorism?


aph·o·rism  /ˈafəˌrizəm/  noun

noun: aphorism; plural noun: aphorisms

a pithy observation that contains a general truth, such as, “if it ain't broke, don't fix it.”

synonyms: saying, maxim, axiom, adage, epigram, dictum, gnome, proverb, saw, tag; rareapophthegm
"she was a fount of Orwellian aphorisms"

•a concise statement of a scientific principle, typically by an ancient classical author.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 27, 2015, 05:43:33 AM
There is help for the oldtimers.


On this day in 1998, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves use of the drug Viagra, an oral medication that treats impotence.

Don't believe his warning, it isn't that bad but watch the entire video.

https://youtu.be/JN0VtHez9xI (https://youtu.be/JN0VtHez9xI)

https://youtu.be/JN0VtHez9xI
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on March 27, 2015, 09:17:03 AM
Mies was also known for using what other famous aphorism?

"I know, right?"
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 27, 2015, 03:48:26 PM
27 Mar 1843
Elijah McCoy was born.
A Black-American inventor holding many patents for the automatic lubrication of machinery. Born in Colchester, Ontario, Canada. While resident in Ypsilanti, Michigan, after two years of development, he received his first U.S. patent, No. 129,843 on 23 Jun 1872, for a lubricator for steam engines. By 1926 he held several dozen patents for devices that enabled a steady supply of oil to machinery, in drops flowing from a reservoir cup while the machine continued to run, thus eliminating the need to stop the machine to oil it. These were used by stationary steam engines in factories, railway locomotives, steam-powered inland waterway and ocean ships. His inventiveness yielded other patents, including an ironing table, scaffold support and rubber heel.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on March 27, 2015, 06:43:35 PM
Tenerife. 1977. 583 dead. Deadliest aviation accident in history.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 28, 2015, 06:32:37 AM
1915   First American citizen killed during WWI

1984   Baltimore Colts move to Indianapolis

1969   Eisenhower dies

1814   Funeral held for the man behind the guillotine

The funeral of Guillotin, the inventor and namesake of the infamous execution device, takes place outside of Paris, France. Guillotin had what he felt were the purest motives for inventing the guillotine and was deeply distressed at how his reputation had become besmirched in the aftermath. Guillotin had bestowed the deadly contraption on the French as a “philanthropic gesture” for the systematic criminal justice reform that was taking place in 1789. The machine was intended to show the intellectual and social progress of the Revolution; by killing aristocrats and journeymen the same way, equality in death was ensured.

The first use of the guillotinewas onApril 251792, when Nicolas Pelletier was put to death for armed robbery and assault in Place de Greve. The newspapers reported that guillotine was not an immediate sensation. The crowds seemed to miss the gallows at first. However, it quickly caught on with the public and many thought it brought dignity back to the executioner.

However, the prestige of the guillotine fell precipitously due to its frequent use in the French Terror following the Revolution. It became the focal point of the awful political executions and was so closely identified with the terrible abuses of the time that it was perceived as partially responsible for the excesses itself. Still, it was used sporadically in France into the 20th century.


Why is it snowing outside of my window today?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 28, 2015, 06:39:06 AM
Mar. 28, 1942       
A British ship, the HMS Capbeltown (formerly USS Buchanan), a Lend-Lease American destroyer, which was specifically rammed into a German occupied dry-dock in St. Nazaire, France, explodes, knocking the area out of action for the German battleship Tirpitz.
Modification were made to make the ship look as much like a German Möwe class destroyer as was possible so that German guards lining the banks of the River Loire would not suspect anything as she sailed into port. Anything on the ship that was not deemed vital to the raid was removed in an effort to make the ship as fast and as light as was possible. However, extra armour plating was put around the bridge to protect this vital area of the ship. 4.5 tons of the explosive amatol was placed in steel tanks in the front of HMS Campbeltown.
 
HMS Campbeltown sailed from Falmouth harbour on March 26th 1942. Nineteen ships made up the flotilla guarded by two destroyers. As she sailed up the Loire, Campbeltown flew the flag of the Kriegsmarine but as it approached its target, this was taken down and replaced with the Fighting Ensign of the Royal Navy.
 
The raid went as planned and HMS Campbeltown rammed the gates of the dry docks. The explosives detonated on March 28th and it blew off the front section of HMS Campbeltown. The gates of the dry dock were destroyed and the rush of water that followed the explosion swept the remains of the ship into the dry dock.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on March 28, 2015, 06:45:52 AM
That raid was heroic.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 28, 2015, 07:18:49 AM
1941   English novelist Virginia Woolf throws herself into the River Ouse near her home in Sussex. Her body is never found.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on March 28, 2015, 07:27:01 AM
1941   English novelist Virginia Woolf throws herself into the River Ouse near her home in Sussex. Her body is never found.

I'll keep looking. I think I remember where I put her.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 29, 2015, 07:19:10 AM
Mar. 28, 1973,
Dr Hook And The Medicine Show got their picture on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine after their hit, 'The Cover of Rolling Stone' reached No. 6 on the US singles chart. According to members of the group, they really did buy five copies for their mothers, just like the song said.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 29, 2015, 07:27:35 AM
Borrowed Days
According to an old Scottish rhyme, the last three days in March were "borrowed" from April, in return for which March promised to destroy three young sheep. Other references go back even farther. Both an ancient calendar of the Church of Rome and a 1548 book known as The Complaynt of Scotland allude to the days at the end of March as being more like winter than spring. Whatever their origin, it seems likely that the wet, windy weather that so often comes at the end of March gave rise to the notion that this month had to "borrow" some additional time.

So, did that explain this crazy weather?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on March 29, 2015, 07:50:34 AM
1976   Eight Ohio National Guardsmen are indicted for shooting four Kent State students during an anti-war protest on May 4, 1970.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 30, 2015, 06:10:29 AM
Mar. 30, 1945
HAPPY BIRTHDAY ERIC CLAPTON!
 :banana: :beerchug: :banana:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on March 31, 2015, 06:07:24 AM
Mar. 31, 1995,
Jimmy Page escaped being knifed when a fan rushed the stage at a Page and Plant gig at Auburn Hills, Michigan. The fan was stopped by two security guards, who he knifes instead. After his arrest, he told police that he wanted to kill Jimmy Page because of the Satanic music he was playing.
 :firedevil:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on March 31, 2015, 07:29:20 AM

The Eiffel Tower Is Inaugurated (1889)

Among the most recognized and visited structures in the world, the Eiffel Tower was built beside the Seine River in Paris between 1887 and 1889 as the entrance arch for the Exposition Universelle, a World's Fair marking the centennial celebration of the French Revolution. Named after its designer, engineer Gustave Eiffel, the tower was constructed by 300 workers who joined together 18,038 pieces of puddled iron using 2,500,000 rivets. How many people died during the tower's construction?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 01, 2015, 10:56:55 AM
1945   U.S. forces launch invasion of Okinawa.

Private First Class Eugene B. Sledge of the 1st Marine Division had been fighting in 1945 on the miserable island of Okinawa for six weeks. Continuous rain transformed the terrain into a sea of mud that clutched soldiers' boots and stalled large vehicles, while Japanese mortar and artillery shells poured down in a violent fury that mangled bodies and twisted weapons.

The island, according to Sledge, was 'the most ghastly corner of hell I had ever witnessed….Every crater was half full of water, and many of them held a Marine corpse. The bodies lay pathetically just as they had been killed, half submerged in muck and water, rusting weapons still in hand. Swarms of big flies hovered about them.' Wherever he looked, Sledge saw 'maggots and decay. Men struggled and fought and bled in an environment so degrading I believed we had been flung into hell's own cesspool.'

For almost three months, Army and Marine divisions battled to wrest the island from Japan's tenacious grasp, and when the final shot had been fired, more men had fallen there than at any other Pacific battleground. Army and Marine troops would long retain haunting memories of that island only 360 miles southwest of Japan. It was called Okinawa.
- See more at: http://www.historynet.com/battle-of-okinawa-the-bloodiest-battle-of-the-pacific-war.htm#sthash.V8LjoXp2.dpuf (http://www.historynet.com/battle-of-okinawa-the-bloodiest-battle-of-the-pacific-war.htm#sthash.V8LjoXp2.dpuf)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 02, 2015, 05:46:37 AM
Apr. 2, 1931   
Virne "Jackie" Mitchell becomes the first woman to play for an all-male pro baseball team. In an exhibition game against the New York Yankees, she strikes out both Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 02, 2015, 05:51:00 AM
First Congresswoman in US History Takes Her Seat (1917)

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Sometimes referred to as the "Lady of the House," Jeannette Rankin was the first woman to be elected to the US House of Representatives and the first female member of Congress. Just days into her term, she drew the ire of the press by voting, along with 56 others, against the resolution to enter WWI. In 1940, Rankin was again elected to Congress and once again voted against entering a world war, though this time she was the only Congress member to do so. What was the Jeanette Rankin Brigade?

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 02, 2015, 05:53:48 AM
International Children's Book Day

This day, which is observed by countries all over the world, is held on Hans Christian Andersen's birthday, April 2, because the Danish author's stories have been favorites among children of all nationalities. Celebrations include contests in which children illustrate their favorite books. Every two years the International Board on Books for Young People sponsors the Hans Christian Andersen medals, which are awarded to a children's book author and a children's book illustrator for their contributions to children's literature.


He looks a little different than in his movies.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 02, 2015, 06:02:34 AM
1932   Charles Lindbergh pays over $50,000 ransom for his kidnapped son.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on April 02, 2015, 06:38:01 AM
What was the Jeanette Rankin Brigade?

A really bad Prog Rock Band.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on April 02, 2015, 01:36:34 PM
What was the Jeanette Rankin Brigade?

A really bad Prog Rock Band.

Oh-I seen them dudes-they didn't know any tunes.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 03, 2015, 06:48:54 AM
Marlon Brando (1924)

Regarded as the greatest actor of his generation and one of the most influential actors of all time, Marlon Brando was known for his naturalistic performances. He achieved fame on Broadway in A Streetcar Named Desire, later starring in the film version. Considered the foremost practitioner of the New York Actors Studio style of "method" acting, Brando earned Academy Awards for his roles in On the Waterfront and The Godfather. Why did he refuse the latter award?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on April 03, 2015, 06:59:57 AM
Native American Rights
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 03, 2015, 07:06:42 AM
I think it was that the academy has a rule about enjoying butter rectally so he had to decline the award.

















Last Tango in Paris
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 04, 2015, 11:01:33 AM
1581   Francis Drake completes circumnavigation of the world.  (All those RTW riders on the ADV site think they are doing something special)
1812   The territory of Orleans becomes the 18th state and will become known as Louisiana. 
1818   The United States flag is declared to have 13 red and white stripes and 20 stars.
1841   President William Henry Harrison, aged 68, becomes the first president to die in office, just a month after being sworn in.
1917   The U.S. Senate votes 90-6 to enter World War I on Allied side.  (Who were the 6 that voted no?)
1949   The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) treaty is signed.
1968   Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee.
1974   Hank Aaron ties Babe Ruth's home-run record.


Todays birthday.

1896   Arthur Murray, ballroom dance instructor.  (So you can dance the night away)
1915   Muddy Waters, American blues musician.
1928   Maya Angelou, American poet and author.
1932   Anthony Perkins, actor (Psycho).  (Yes Mother)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 04, 2015, 11:18:18 AM
1933 Dirigible crash kills 73

On this day in 1933, a dirigible crashes in New Jersey, killing 73 people in one of the first air disasters in history. The Akron was the largest airship built in the United States when it took its first flight in August 1931. In its short life of less than two years, it was involved in two fatal accidents.

In 1932, the Akron made a flight from New Jersey to the Camp Kearny military base, near San Diego, California. It attempted to land in high winds, with three groups of 30 men each assigned to help pull in the blimp and secure it to the ground with ropes. But the Akron, which was filled with helium, began to rise again after the sailors had begun to secure it. Three men held on to their ropes as the Akron rose into the air; two of the three fell from 200 feet and were killed. The third man, Bud Cowart, managed to hold on at the end of the rope for two hours as the Akron dragged him 2,000 feet above the ground. Finally, the crew managed to pull him up into the airship through a porthole.

The second accident involving the Akron occurred on April 4, 1933, while the U.S. Navy was using the airship to obtain some technical data over New Jersey. It was well-known that dirigibles could experience problems in bad weather, but despite the violent thunderstorms in the area that day, the Akron was not grounded. While in the air over the Atlantic Ocean, a miscommunication over directions by crew members sent the Akron directly into the storm instead of around it. The storm’s winds caused the ship to plunge nearly 1,000 feet in a few seconds.

The crew then made its second mistake: the blimp’s water ballast was dumped in order to make the flying ship rise. However, the ballast dump thrust the Akron up too far, too fast. Critical devices and cables were destroyed and all control was lost. The Akron plunged into the ocean.

The rescue airship J-3 was sent to help the Akron crew. It also crashed in of the storm, killing two of the seven crew members on board. Only three of the Akron‘s 76 crew members survived the disaster. One of the survivors was the commander who had ordered the fateful ballast dump.

This was the deadliest air disaster since the crash of the first rigid airship built in the United States, the Shenandoah, which killed 14 people on September 3, 1925.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 05, 2015, 05:32:32 AM
Pocahontas married John Rolfe.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 05, 2015, 05:50:11 AM
Battle of the Ice (1242)
The Teutonic Knights attacked the Republic of Novgorod in 1242 as part of their Northern Crusades, which were directed against pagans and Eastern Orthodox Christians rather than Muslims in the Holy Land. Waged on the frozen surface of Lake Peipus, which now sits on the border of Estonia and Russia, the Battle of the Ice proved disastrous for the knights. Though some historians consider the battle a major turning point in the Northern Crusades, others believe it was only a minor skirmish. Why?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 05, 2015, 05:54:43 AM
Tater Days
Considered the oldest trade day in the US, Tater Days is now a celebration of the sweet potato in Benton, Kentucky. The event started in 1843 when sweet potatoes were a staple crop of the area. Today, the "tater" is honored with a parade, flea market, gospel music, arts and crafts exhibits, and a Miss Tater Day contest. Most of the food served is some kind of sweet potato concoction.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on April 05, 2015, 06:08:09 AM
This should clear up nothing.

http://news.discovery.com/history/what-does-easter-bunny-come-have-to-do-easter-120406.htm (http://news.discovery.com/history/what-does-easter-bunny-come-have-to-do-easter-120406.htm)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 05, 2015, 06:24:44 AM
Balls in the Air:
Apr. 5, 1968
To protest the lack of an aerial display to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Royal Air Force four days earlier and to demonstrate against the government of Prime Minister Harold Wilson, Flight Lieutenant Alan Pollock of the RAF's No. 1(F) Squadron makes an unauthorized display flight in a Hawker Hunter during which he "beats up" (i. e., buzzes) several RAF airfields and flies low over London, where circles the Houses of Parliament, dips his wings to the Royal Air Force Memorial, and flies under the top span of Tower Bridge, becoming the first person to fly under the bridge's upper span in a jet aircraft. He is arrested upon his return to base.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 06, 2015, 06:03:42 AM
Apr. 6, 1892
Born today:
Donald Wills Douglas was an American aircraft designer whose Douglas Aircraft Company produced military and civil aircraft. He graduating from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as its first aeronautics student (1914), then consulted and designed for others until he founded his own business (1920). Over the years his company set the industry standard for reliability and safety. The DC series of commercial passenger planes, beginning with the DC-1 (which entered service in 1933) led to the DC-8, the first commercial jet airliner in 1958. In addition to military aircraft, the company also produced military missiles and spacecraft. The business merged with McDonnell Aircraft Company in 1967, and after his death, with Boeing in 1997.
Quote
Dream no small dream; it lacks magic. Dream large. Then make the dream real.
-D.W. Douglas
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 06, 2015, 06:16:06 AM
Opening of the First Modern Olympic Games (1896)
In 1894, after efforts by Frenchman Pierre de Coubertin to revive the ancient Greek Olympics, the newly established International Olympic Committee appointed the Greek capital of Athens as the host city for the first modern international Olympic Games. Held between April 6 and 15, 1896, the games drew athletes from 14 countries for several athletic events, including the first modern marathon. Though women were not allowed to compete, one woman protested the day after the marathon by doing what?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on April 06, 2015, 11:59:39 AM
Though women were not allowed to compete, one woman protested the day after the marathon by doing what?

Farting in their general direction.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 07, 2015, 05:16:12 AM
Candle Auction
The old custom of "selling by candle" is still observed in scattered locations throughout England, among them the village of Tatworth in Somerset. Every year on the Tuesday following April 6, six acres of valuable watercress-growing land are leased to the highest bidder. The bidders gather behind locked doors in a room illuminated only by a candle stuck to a board. A pin is inserted into the candle an inch below the flame; as the candle burns, the melting wax eventually releases the pin. The person who got the last bid in before the pin dropped will be able to use the land in the year to come.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 07, 2015, 11:43:53 AM
Apr. 7, 1915,
Born on this day, Billie Holiday, (Elenora Fagan), the greatest female jazz singer of all time. Made over 100 records, worked with Count Basie, Duke Ellington, numerous arrests for drugs possession. Died on 17th July 1959 from liver failure, aged 44.
http://youtu.be/iNgy5zDtW-s (http://youtu.be/iNgy5zDtW-s)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on April 07, 2015, 01:02:07 PM

April 7, 2015 is

National Beer Day



Today is National Beer Day! Send a free Beer Day eCard to spread the word! People have been brewing beer ever since they began cultivating domesticated grains 8,000 years ago. Beer has been an important part of human culture ever since. For example, over 4,000 years ago an anonymous poet wrote an ode to Ninkasi—the Sumerian goddess of beer and brewing! Today, beer is the third most popular beverage in the world behind water and tea.

So why is National Beer Day celebrated on April 7th? On this day in 1933, President Franklin Roosevelt took the first step toward ending Prohibition and signed a law that allowed people to brew and sell beer as long as it remained below 4.0% alcohol by volume (ABV). Despite the low ABV, Americans were thrilled to be able to purchase beer for the first time in thirteen years!

Whether you prefer pale ale, stout, or lager, enjoy a pint of your favorite beer today to celebrate National Beer Day!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 08, 2015, 05:31:37 AM
Apr. 8, 1998,
Rolling Stones guitarist Ron Wood was rescued, along with 11 other passengers, in the nick of time, from a boat when an engine caught fire. The boat was exploring the islands near Angra Dos Reis, south of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, when one of the boat's engines caught fire. Passengers were rescued by nearby journalists, just before the boat exploded.
 :eek:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 09, 2015, 05:49:29 AM
Apr. 9, 1974,
African American, Phil Brooks was issued a U.S. patent for a disposable syringe (No. 3,802,434).
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on April 09, 2015, 09:09:01 PM
The Astrodome opened 50 years ago today.

http://www.khou.com/story/news/local/2015/04/08/preparations-underway-for-astrodomes-50th-birthday-party/25493049/ (http://www.khou.com/story/news/local/2015/04/08/preparations-underway-for-astrodomes-50th-birthday-party/25493049/)



I'm still an Astros fan.  :clap:

Much better than a Cubs fan.  :twofinger:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 10, 2015, 05:29:42 AM
Apr. 10, 1965,
A British school in Wrexham, North Wales, asked parents to please keep children in school uniform and not to send them to school in 'corduroy trousers', like the ones worn by The Rolling Stones.
Quote
Hey, teacher , leave them kids alone!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 10, 2015, 05:47:56 AM
The Astrodome opened 50 years ago today.

[url]http://www.khou.com/story/news/local/2015/04/08/preparations-underway-for-astrodomes-50th-birthday-party/25493049/[/url] ([url]http://www.khou.com/story/news/local/2015/04/08/preparations-underway-for-astrodomes-50th-birthday-party/25493049/[/url])



I'm still an Astros fan.  :clap:

Much better than a Cubs fan.  :twofinger:


It was also the first indoor home run.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 10, 2015, 05:48:51 AM
Salvation Army Founder's Day
April 10 is the day on which William Booth (1829-1912), founder of the international religious and charitable movement known as The Salvation Army, was born in Nottingham, England. With the help of his wife, Catherine, he established the East London Revival Society, which soon became known as the Christian Mission and later the Salvation Army. Although Booth's birthday is observed to varying degrees at Salvation Army outposts around the world, a major celebration was held on the organization's centennial in 1965.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 10, 2015, 08:41:27 AM
1945   Allied troops liberate the Nazi concentration camp of Buchenwald north of Weiner, Germany.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 10, 2015, 09:59:11 AM
Today in history (today actually), a poll was published on favourite goldfish names. I can't remember the result.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on April 10, 2015, 02:36:47 PM
April 10  1834   New Orleans
A torture chamber is uncovered by arson

A fire at the LaLaurie mansion in New Orleans, Louisiana, lead to the discovery of a torture chamber where slaves were routinely brutalized by Delphine LaLaurie. Rescuers found a 70-year-old black woman trapped in the kitchen during the fire because she was chained up while LaLaurie was busy saving her furniture. The woman later revealed that she had set the fire in an attempt to escape LaLaurie’s torture. She led authorities up to the attic, where seven slaves were tied with spiked iron collars.

After Delphine LaLaurie married her third husband, Louis LaLaurie, and moved into his estate on Royal Street, she immediately took control of the large number of slaves used as servants. LaLaurie was a well-known sadist, but the mistreatment of slaves by the wealthy and socially connected was not a matter for the police at the time.

However, in 1833, Delphine chased a small slave girl with a whip until the girl fell off the roof of the house and died. LaLaurie tried to cover up the incident, but police found the body hidden in a well. Authorities decided to fine LaLaurie and force the sale of the other slaves on the estate.  LaLaurie foiled this plan by arranging for her relatives and friends to buy the slaves. She then sneaked them back into the mansion, where she continued to torture them until the night of the fire in April 1834.

Apparently her Southern neighbors had some standards when it came to the treatment of slaves, because a mob gathered in protest after learning about LaLaurie’s torture chamber. She and her husband fled by boat, leaving the butler (who had also participated in the torture) to face the wrath of the crowd.

Although charges were never filed against LaLaurie, her reputation in upper-class society was destroyed.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 10, 2015, 02:39:34 PM
I told you that the American Revolution was a bad idea.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Stickman on April 10, 2015, 03:19:34 PM
Today is a national holiday for all pets, big and small (and an unofficial national holiday for those of us who love and care for them). On this day in 1866, The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) is founded in New York City by philanthropist and diplomat Henry Bergh. Nine days later, the first effective anti-cruelty law in the United States was passed, allowing the ASPCA to investigate complaints of animal cruelty and to make arrests. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 11, 2015, 06:26:36 AM
I told you that the American Revolution was a bad idea.

1783   After receiving a copy of the provisional treaty on 13 March, Congress proclaims a formal end to hostilities with Great Britain.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 11, 2015, 07:14:24 AM
1970   Apollo 13 launched to moon

1961   Bob Dylan plays his first major gig in New York City
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 11, 2015, 07:17:13 AM
Apr. 11, 2005
Maurice R. Hilleman, died this day.
The American microbiologist who developed vaccines against numerous once-common diseases including mumps, measles and rubella, chickenpox, hepatitis (A and B), pneumonia, meningitis and influenza. In his 40-year career, he developed over three dozen experimental and licensed animal and human vaccines. Although Jonas Salk, Albert Sabin and Louis Pasteur received much public recognition, Hilleman's work is probably responsible for saving more lives than those of any other scientist in the 20th century.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 12, 2015, 06:05:07 AM
Apr. 12, 1917
Many historians have pointed to the victory at Vimy Ridge during World War I as a moment of greatness for Canada, when it emerged from Britain’s shadow to attain its own measure of military achievement. As a result of the victory, earned despite the failure of the larger Allied offensive of which it was a part, Canadian forces earned a reputation for efficiency and strength on the battlefield.

The Allied offensive—masterminded by the French commander in chief, Robert Nivelle—began Easter Monday, April 9, 1917, as British and Canadian forces launched simultaneous attacks on German positions at Arras and Vimy Ridge, a heavily fortified, seven-kilometer-long raised stretch of land with a sweeping view of the Allied lines. The first day was overwhelmingly successful for the Allies, as the British punched through the Hindenburg Line—the defensive positions to which Germany had retreated in February 1917—and overran sections of two German trench lines within two hours, taking 5,600 prisoners.

The Canadians, attacking over a stretch of land littered with the dead of previous French attacks on the same positions, also moved swiftly in the first hours of the offensive, as four Canadian divisions stormed the ridge at 5:30 am on April 9, moving forward under cover of a punishing artillery barrage that forced the Germans to hunker down in their trenches and away from their machine guns. More than 15,000 Canadian infantry troops attacked Vimy Ridge that day, overrunning the German positions and taking 4,000 prisoners.

Three more days of heavy fighting resulted in victory on April 12, when control of Vimy was in Canadian hands. Though the Nivelle Offensive as a whole failed miserably, the Canadian operation had proved a success, albeit a costly one: 3,598 Canadian soldiers were killed and another 7,000 were wounded. Vimy Ridge became a shining example of Canada’s effort in the Great War, and one that served as a symbol of the sacrifice the young British dominion had made for the Allied cause. As Brigadier-General A.E. Ross famously declared after the war, in those few minutes I witnessed the birth of a nation. In 1922, the French government ceded Vimy Ridge and the land surrounding it to Canada; the gleaming white marble Vimy Memorial was unveiled in 1936 as a testament to the more than 60,000 Canadians who died in service during World War I.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 12, 2015, 06:46:17 AM
1861   Fort Sumter is shelled by Confederacy, starting America's Civil War.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 13, 2015, 05:33:27 AM
Apr.13, 2012,
Five of Tom Petty's guitars were stolen from a soundstage in Culver City, California, where Petty and his band, the Heartbreakers, were rehearsing for their upcoming worldwide tour. The stolen gear included a 1967 Blonde Rickenbacker, a 1967 Epiphone Sheridan, a 1965 Gibson SG TV Jr., a Fender Broadcaster and a Dusenberg Mike Campbell Model, which belonged to Campbell himself. Petty was offering a "no questions asked" reward bounty of $7,500 to anyone with information leading to the guitars' recovery.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 13, 2015, 07:00:42 AM
Butch Cassidy (1866)
Born Robert LeRoy Parker, Butch Cassidy was a notorious outlaw who began robbing trains and cattle rustling in the mid-1880s. By 1900, he had partnered with Harry Longabaugh—the "Sundance Kid," whose nickname was derived from the name of a town where he had once been imprisoned. They became the foremost members of the Wild Bunch, a notorious group of bank and train robbers. The two evaded US authorities by escaping to South America, where they continued their criminal pursuits. How did they die?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 13, 2015, 07:49:24 AM
1970   An oxygen tank explodes on Apollo 13, preventing a planned moon landing and jeopardizing the lives of the three-man crew.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on April 13, 2015, 10:04:31 AM
April 13th 1742 saw the first public performance of Handel's Messiah in Dublin.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: xsrider on April 13, 2015, 05:13:22 PM
April 13, 1964   Sidney Poitier becomes the first black to win an Oscar for best actor.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on April 13, 2015, 07:12:45 PM
10 years later he makes "Uptown Saturday Night"/

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072351/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1 (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072351/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 14, 2015, 03:01:44 AM
The Titanic hit an iceberg. But it's all right, as nobody dies until tomorrow.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 14, 2015, 05:40:53 AM
Apr. 14, 1971,
The Illinois Crime Commission issued a list of 'drug-oriented records' including 'White Rabbit' by Jefferson Airplane, 'A Whiter Shade Of Pale' by Procol Harum and The Beatles 'Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds.
 :facepalm:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 14, 2015, 05:45:29 AM
Public Kinetoscope Parlor Opens in New York (1894)
The kinetoscope is an early motion picture exhibition device that creates the illusion of movement by conveying a filmstrip of sequential images over a light source with a high-speed shutter. The first public kinetoscope parlor was opened in New York City in 1894 and introduced the basic approach that would become the standard for all cinematic projection before the advent of video. The venue had 10 machines, each showing a different short movie. How much did it cost to view all 10 films?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 14, 2015, 07:15:44 AM
 1865   President Abraham Lincoln is assassinated in Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 14, 2015, 07:52:39 AM
1828  Noah Webster copyrighted the first edition of his dictionary.

1860  The first pony express rider reached his destination of San Francisco. He left St. Joseph, Mo., on April 3.



Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on April 14, 2015, 08:21:29 AM
1865   President Abraham Lincoln is assassinated in Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
But it's alright...  He was shot at 10:15 pm on the 14th, but didn't die until 7:22 am on the 15th.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 14, 2015, 01:11:25 PM
1865   President Abraham Lincoln is assassinated in Ford's Theater by John Wilkes Booth.
But it's alright...  He was shot at 10:15 pm on the 14th, but didn't die until 7:22 am on the 15th.

So, he's still alive!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 14, 2015, 02:55:40 PM
Apr. 14, 1971,
The Illinois Crime Commission issued a list of 'drug-oriented records' including 'White Rabbit' by Jefferson Airplane, 'A Whiter Shade Of Pale' by Procol Harum and The Beatles 'Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds.
 :facepalm:

I like all those songs, um, just a coincidence. :bigsmile:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on April 14, 2015, 04:18:59 PM
Apr. 14, 1971,
The Illinois Crime Commission issued a list of 'drug-oriented records' including 'White Rabbit' by Jefferson Airplane, 'A Whiter Shade Of Pale' by Procol Harum and The Beatles 'Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds.
 :facepalm:

I like all those songs, um, just a coincidence. :bigsmile:
d o o o o d

Sent from my XT1058

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on April 14, 2015, 04:29:02 PM
How much did it cost to view all 10 films?

A penny each for the first nine; the tenth film with that hoochie coochie dancer was a nickel.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on April 14, 2015, 06:50:37 PM
Percy Sledge dies at 83.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on April 15, 2015, 03:35:28 AM
70 years ago today, Bergen-Belsen concentration camp liberated by British troops.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 15, 2015, 04:39:36 AM
The Titanic sinks, with huge loss of life.

Abraham Lincoln calls for 75000 volunteers to quell the Southern rebellion.

Abraham Lincoln dies.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 15, 2015, 05:27:34 AM
Apr. 15, In 1770
 Dr. Joseph Priestley made the first mention in English that a piece of a rubber substance could erase marks from black-lead pencils. At the end of the Preface to his work, Familiar Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Perspective, he described it: "Since this Work was printed off, I have seen a substance excellently adapted to the purpose of wiping from paper the mark of a black-lead-pencil. It must, therefore, be of singular use to those who practise drawing. It is sold by Mr Nairne, Mathematical Instrument Maker, opposite the Royal Exchange. He sells a cubical piece of about half an inch for three shillings; and he says it will last several years."
This invention became known as the "eraser", and allowed me to pass written examinations!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 16, 2015, 05:47:02 AM
Apr. 16, 1945
The destroyer USS Laffey survives horrific damage from attacks by 22 Japanese aircraft off Okinawa, earning the nickname "The Ship That Would Not Die."
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on April 16, 2015, 11:10:20 AM
April 16, 1889, future Hollywood legend Charlie Chaplin is born in London, England.

Chaplin, one of the most financially successful stars of early Hollywood, was introduced to the stage when he was five. The son of London music hall entertainers, young Chaplin was watching a show starring his mother when her voice cracked. He was quickly shuffled onto the stage to finish the act.

Chaplin’s father died when Chaplin was a toddler, and when his mother had a nervous breakdown Chaplin and his older half-brother, Sydney, roamed London, where they danced on the streets and collected pennies in a hat. They eventually went to an orphanage and joined the Eight Lancashire Lads, a children’s dance troupe. When Chaplin was 17, he developed his comedic skills with the help of Fred Karno’s company, for which his half-brother had already become a popular comedian. Soon, Chaplin’s bowler hat, out-turned feet, mustache and walking cane became his trademark.
Chaplin refined what would soon become his legacy, the character Charlie the Tramp.
Chaplin founded United Artists Corporation in 1919 with Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks and director D.W. Griffith.

Though he had lived in the United States for 42 years, Chaplin never became a U.S. citizen. A vocal pacifist, Chaplin was accused of communist ties, which he denied. Nevertheless, in 1952, immigration officials prevented Chaplin and his wife from re-entering the United States after a foreign tour. The couple did not return to the United States for 20 years; instead they settled in Switzerland with their eight children.
Chaplin returned to America 1972 to accept a special Academy Award for “the incalculable effect he has had on making motion pictures the art for and of this century.”
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 17, 2015, 05:29:44 AM
Apr. 17, 1983,
Felix Pappalardi, producer and bass player with rock band Mountain was shot dead by his wife Gail Collins during a jealous rage. Collins was convicted of criminally negligent homicide and sentenced to four years in prison. Pappalardi who was 43 had produced the Cream albums 'Disraeli Gears' and 'Wheels of Fire. He was unofficially known as the "fourth member of Cream", and a heckuva bass player.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 17, 2015, 06:01:28 AM
1961   Some 1,400 Cuban exiles attack the Bay of Pigs in an attempt to overthrow Fidel Castro.  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on April 17, 2015, 10:28:31 AM
In 858, Benedict III ends his reign as Catholic Pope.

 In 1861, Virginia become eighth state to secede from the Union.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 17, 2015, 01:26:59 PM
1521 – Trial of Martin Luther over his teachings begins during the assembly of the Diet of Worms. Initially intimidated, he asks for time to reflect before answering and is given a stay of one day.

Wait til tomorrow!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 17, 2015, 02:38:59 PM
If they offered me a diet of worms, I could give 'em a prompt answer...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 17, 2015, 02:42:18 PM
If they offered me a diet of worms, I could give 'em a prompt answer...


Hang him. castrate him, then quarter him.

It was what they intended to do to Martin Luther.

But you have to wait until tomorrow....
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on April 17, 2015, 04:18:58 PM
After nailing his list of reforms to the door of the church, they arrested him and put him on trial (diet) in Worms, Germany. Hence the memory trick of, "Martin Luthor had a diet of worms."

After standing his ground, Luthor (in spite of a letter of safe passage) was declared an outlaw (could be killed on sight without punishment) by the Roman Emperor. A plan was hatched by the Princes who supported Luthor, to kidnap him. What this really did was get him to safety with plausible deniablility by the officials who secreted him away to safe haven while The Reformation stabilized.

Ah the wonders of a liberal arts/theology education.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 18, 2015, 02:16:10 AM
1521 – Trial of Martin Luther begins its second day during the assembly of the Diet of Worms. He refuses to recant his teachings despite the risk of excommunication.

Exciting, eh?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 18, 2015, 06:28:20 AM
More like "scary".
Communication with one's "ex" could be considered a form of torture.

Apr. 18, 1950,
The first U.S. jet passenger international trip was a flight from Malton Airport in Toronto, Canada to the International Airport, New York City. The Avro Canada jetliner carried a crew of three, with three passengers, and 15,000 airmail letters (which became the first airmail letters carried in the U.S. by jet plane). The 359 mile flight took one hour, powered by four Rolls-Royce Derwent jet engines.
http://youtu.be/zfPhIT7VLVg (http://youtu.be/zfPhIT7VLVg)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on April 18, 2015, 09:09:14 AM
1521 – Trial of Martin Luther begins its second day during the assembly of the Diet of Worms. He refuses to recant his teachings despite the risk of excommunication.

Exciting, eh?

The result of which was his excommunication from The Church; leading to the eventual establishment of the Lutheran Church.

To this day, seats of power (religious and political) sell "indulgences" not unlike those Luther protested within the Catholic Church. They continue to be a source of corruption.

In the US it's often known as SuperPACs and Lobbying.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 18, 2015, 10:21:29 AM
1521 – Trial of Martin Luther begins its second day during the assembly of the Diet of Worms. He refuses to recant his teachings despite the risk of excommunication.

Exciting, eh?

The result of which was his excommunication from The Church; leading to the eventual establishment of the Lutheran Church.

To this day, seats of power (religious and political) sell "indulgences" not unlike those Luther protested within the Catholic Church. They continue to be a source of corruption.

In the US it's often known as SuperPACs and Lobbying.

You've spoiled the ending. I was planning on reporting on his trial for a while.... :'(
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on April 18, 2015, 01:35:33 PM
1521 – Trial of Martin Luther begins its second day during the assembly of the Diet of Worms. He refuses to recant his teachings despite the risk of excommunication.

Exciting, eh?

The result of which was his excommunication from The Church; leading to the eventual establishment of the Lutheran Church.

To this day, seats of power (religious and political) sell "indulgences" not unlike those Luther protested within the Catholic Church. They continue to be a source of corruption.

In the US it's often known as SuperPACs and Lobbying.

You've spoiled the ending. I was planning on reporting on his trial for a while.... :'(

Is he the one that nailed 95 feces to a door? 

That's some shit...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 19, 2015, 03:41:27 AM
Now back to our regularly schedule program.

The World's First Space Station Is Launched (1971)
The world's first space station, the Soviet Salyut 1, was launched in 1971. The cosmonauts aboard the Soyuz 11 spacecraft were the first to enter, remaining aboard for 22 days. By 1982, five more Salyut space stations had been orbited successfully, two of them for military purposes. By rotating the crews regularly, the Soviets were able to staff the stations for extended periods. All the Salyut space stations decayed and are no longer in orbit. What happened to Salyut 1?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 19, 2015, 06:00:47 AM
1993   The FBI ends a 51-day siege by storming the Branch Dividian religious cult headquarters in Waco, Texas.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 19, 2015, 06:50:35 AM
Abraham Lincoln's funeral.


1943 – Swiss chemist Dr. Albert Hofmann deliberately takes LSD for the first time.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 19, 2015, 06:55:03 AM
Apr. 19, 2012,
Levon Helm, died of throat cancer aged 71. A drummer, singer and multi-instrumentalist, Helm formed his own high school band, the Jungle Bush Beaters, at 17, he later joined The Hawks (who became Bob Dylan's backing group) who then became known as The Band. He sang on Band classics like 'The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,' 'Up on Cripple Creek,' 'Rag Mama Rag,' and 'The Weight.'
RIP Levon.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on April 19, 2015, 02:55:06 PM
1995 Oklahoma City bombing.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on April 19, 2015, 02:59:38 PM
1775 that whole Lexington and Concord thing.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on April 19, 2015, 05:02:34 PM
What happened to Salyut 1?

It was eaten by Metal Munching Moon Mice.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 20, 2015, 05:14:35 AM
Apr. 20,  1964,
The first picturephone transcontinental call was made between New York City and Anaheim, California. The device consisted of a telephone handset and a small, matching TV. It allowed telephone users to see each other in fuzzy video images as they carried on a conversation.When Picturephone debuted in 1964, at the World's Fair, prices ranged from $16 to $27 for a three-minute call between special booths AT&T set up in New York, Washington and Chicago. It never became popular after it was briefly offered commercially in Chicago.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 20, 2015, 06:32:18 AM
Mrs DD will you be getting pictures of this today?


Sechseläuten
This colorful springtime festival in Zurich, Switzerland, ushers in spring by exploding the Böögg ("snowman"), the symbol of winter. Sechseläuten means the "six-o'clock ringing." On Monday, members of the guilds parade through the city in medieval costumes, accompanied by bands. Everyone converges at six that evening. The bells ring, groups on horseback gallop around the Böögg (which is stuffed with cotton wadding and firecrackers) to the music of a hunting march, and then the Böögg explodes and burns. Torchlight parades go on into the night, and feasts are held at guild halls.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 20, 2015, 08:47:14 AM
1962   The New Orleans Citizens Committee gives free one-way ride to blacks to move North.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 21, 2015, 06:05:15 AM
Apr. 21, 1989
Lockheed SR-71A, 61-7974, Article 2025, outbound on operational sortie from Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, suffers engine explosion, and total hydraulic failure. Pilot Maj. Dan E. House and RSO Capt. Blair L. Bozek both eject safely. This was the final Blackbird loss before the type was withdrawn from service.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 21, 2015, 07:51:35 PM
I had one of those fly over me at the end of kadena airstrip and it scared the hell out of me. I didnt even know they were on the island.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 22, 2015, 05:34:30 AM
Apr. 22, 1924,
A U.S. patent for a laminated padlock was issued to its inventor Harry E. Soref. (No. 1,490,987). As a locksmith, Soref had realized that the cheaper padlocks, made with stamped metal sheels, were poor security because they were easily damaged. He applied the idea to his invention of a laminated padlock that bank vault doors and battleships were built in laminations of layer on layer of steel for greater strength. This would also be a low-cost construction for a padlock. He established Master Lock company in 1921. When he was unable to sell his invention to any existing manufacturer, he began making them at his own company. In 1935, he introduced the Master combination padlock.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 22, 2015, 06:27:56 AM
1954    The Senate Army-McCarthy hearings begin. They are broadcast on television.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on April 22, 2015, 07:25:17 AM
I had one of those fly over me at the end of kadena airstrip and it scared the hell out of me. I didnt even know they were on the island.
I lived on Kadena for a cpl yrs. We could ALWAYS hear when they did the static engine runs - engine out of the plane, in a special frame by special reinforced bunker that deflected the thrust upward.
I was there when the last Habu left.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on April 22, 2015, 09:52:55 AM
Worked in "Engine Test" at Tinker AFB for a few years (running the computers used for vibration diagnostics, etc.).  Their job was all about what you mentioned (engines in frames being run up to and through afterburner). The water cools the exhaust stack; turning to steam when exposed to the afterburner and then raining down on the cars in the parking lot and ruining their paint jobs.

http://media.dma.mil/2008/May/02/2000625034/-1/-1/0/080430-O-0000U-101.JPG (http://media.dma.mil/2008/May/02/2000625034/-1/-1/0/080430-O-0000U-101.JPG)

I spent a bit of time looking over the operators' shoulders while they ran the control panel. We looked on through a (very) thick observation window.

http://www.tinker.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/2014/05/140516-F-jj999-010.JPG (http://www.tinker.af.mil/shared/media/photodb/photos/2014/05/140516-F-jj999-010.JPG)

Once an engine broke loose from it's frame and was flopping all around inside the test cell before they got it shut down. I'm glad I wasn't anywhere near that when it happened.  Talk about "investigations".
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: olderigetfasteriam on April 22, 2015, 11:47:00 AM
1886 - Seduction made illegal in Ohio.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 23, 2015, 05:29:28 AM
Apr. 23, 2008,
Amy Winehouse went out on a drink and drug-fuelled spree and hit and head-butted two men. After drinking all day, Amy visited the Good Mixer pub in Camden, London with Babyshambles guitarist Mik Whitnall. Inside she allegedly punched Mustapha el Mounmi in the face after he refused to give way to her at the pool table. The singer then left to visit Bar Tok in the early hours and once at the bar shouted "I am a legend get these people out. I want to take drugs." After leaving the bar a good Samaritan tried to get her a cab, but she reportedly thought he was trying to molest her and allegedly head-butted him in the face.
Girl knew how to party...
:shrug:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 23, 2015, 05:14:15 PM
Oldest Free Public School Opened in the US (1635)
The Boston Latin School in Massachusetts, originally a school for boys that had just a handful of students, is now a coeducational institution serving more than 2,000 youngsters. It has the distinction of being the oldest public school in the US and claims many influential Bostonians as alumni, including four Harvard University presidents, four Massachusetts governors, and five signers of the Declaration of Independence. Who are the school's most famous dropouts?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on April 23, 2015, 07:58:04 PM
Aerosmith?


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 24, 2015, 05:28:26 AM
Apr. 24, 1988
Marine Corps Colonel Jerry Cadick, then commanding officer of MAG-11, was performing stunts at the MCAS El Toro Air Show before a crowd of 300,000 when he crashed his McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18 Hornet at the bottom of a loop that was too close to the ground. The aircraft was in a nose-high attitude, but still carrying too much energy toward the ground when it impacted at more than 300 mph (480 km/h). Col. Cadick was subjected to extremely high G forces that resulted in his face making contact with the control stick and sustaining serious injury. He broke his arm, elbow and ribs, exploded a vertebra and collapsed a lung. Col. Cadick survived and retired from the Marine Corps. The F/A-18 remained largely intact but was beyond repair. visitors can't see pics , please register or login
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 24, 2015, 07:15:35 AM
1915   Turks of the Ottoman Empire begin massacring the Armenian minority in their country. A million and a half are ethnically cleansed.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 24, 2015, 10:11:07 AM
Apr. 24, 1988
 Col. Cadick survived and retired from the Marine Corps. The F/A-18 remained largely intact but was beyond repair.

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That is because us Marines are tough! :gdog:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Mr. Whippy on April 24, 2015, 10:25:14 AM
Aerosmith?


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.

Steven Tyler is a New Yorker, I'm pretty sure.  His first cousin is a friend of ours and I'm pretty sure he went to a school for performing arts in NYC.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 25, 2015, 05:50:39 AM
Apr. 25 1951       
After a three day fight against Chinese Communist Forces, the Gloucestershire Regiment is annihilated on "Gloucester Hill," in Korea.
About 4,000 troops of the British 29th Brigade, including about 700 from 1st Battalion, The Gloucestershire Regiment, faced more than 27,000 men of the Chinese 63rd Army.
The Glosters eventually ran out of ammunition and, being surrounded, had no choice but make a break for it, to try to get back to friendly lines.
They had started the battle with 700 men but few avoided death or imprisonment.
Fifty-nine were killed and nearly 600 were taken prisoner. Thirty-four died in captivity.
Prisoners remained in POW camps for more than two years until after the armistice was declared in July 1953.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 25, 2015, 06:06:05 AM
1898 – Spanish–American War: The United States declares war on Spain, which, to my mind, was one of the least glorious episodes in US history.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on April 25, 2015, 06:57:40 AM
25th April 1918, Ella Fitzgerald born.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 25, 2015, 09:57:01 AM
100 years ago, the forces of the British Empire, including British, Indian, Australian and New Zealand troops, invaded the Turkish peninsula of Gallipoli. After much loss of life on both sides, the Empire troops lost to the Turks.

Today is Anzac day.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 25, 2015, 04:23:53 PM

100 years ago, the forces of the British Empire, including British, Indian, Australian and New Zealand troops, invaded the Turkish peninsula of Gallipoli. After much loss of life on both sides, the Empire troops lost to the Turks.

Today is Anzac day.

Did you forget the Blue Puttees? There was a small contingent of 40 Newfoundlanders lost in the defeat at Gallipoli.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 26, 2015, 02:35:26 AM

100 years ago, the forces of the British Empire, including British, Indian, Australian and New Zealand troops, invaded the Turkish peninsula of Gallipoli. After much loss of life on both sides, the Empire troops lost to the Turks.

Today is Anzac day.

Did you forget the Blue Puttees? There was a small contingent of 40 Newfoundlanders lost in the defeat at Gallipoli.

Forgot the 16000 French as well.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Slartibartfast on April 26, 2015, 02:37:48 AM


100 years ago, the forces of the British Empire, including British, Indian, Australian and New Zealand troops, invaded the Turkish peninsula of Gallipoli. After much loss of life on both sides, the Empire troops lost to the Turks.

Today is Anzac day.

Did you forget the Blue Puttees? There was a small contingent of 40 Newfoundlanders lost in the defeat at Gallipoli.

Forgot the 16000 French as well.

I didn't realize France was ever a member of the Empire. I don't blame you for glossing that over.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 26, 2015, 02:56:05 AM


100 years ago, the forces of the British Empire, including British, Indian, Australian and New Zealand troops, invaded the Turkish peninsula of Gallipoli. After much loss of life on both sides, the Empire troops lost to the Turks.

Today is Anzac day.

Did you forget the Blue Puttees? There was a small contingent of 40 Newfoundlanders lost in the defeat at Gallipoli.

Forgot the 16000 French as well.

I didn't realize France was ever a member of the Empire. I don't blame you for glossing that over.

The French were members of the French Empire. Bless 'em, we allowed them a little one to play with.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on April 26, 2015, 04:27:25 AM
This day in 1937, Luftwaffe bomb the Basque town of Guernica

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 26, 2015, 05:46:00 AM
Apr. 26, 1969
Led Zeppelin played the second of two nights at The Winterland Ballroom, San Francisco in California. It was during this show that 'Whole Lotta Love' was played live for the first time.
http://youtu.be/FH6MdW0-gok (http://youtu.be/FH6MdW0-gok)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 26, 2015, 06:52:47 AM
Vermont Maple Festival
Vermont is the official maple capital of the world, and the maple festival held there each spring is a statewide celebration. Since 1968, the three-day festival in St. Albans has promoted Vermont maple products through educational exhibits, sugaring equipment displays, essay contests, syrup competitions, maple cooking contests, and a parade. In addition to maple syrup, the festival gives visitors an opportunity to sample maple cream, maple candy, and maple sugar on snow.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on April 26, 2015, 06:59:23 AM
1986 – A nuclear reactor accident occurs at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Soviet Union (now Ukraine), creating the world's worst nuclear disaster.


Only another few 10s of thousands of years and it'll be safe again.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 26, 2015, 07:06:45 AM
1994   Nelson Mandela wins the presidency in South Africa's first multiracial elections.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 26, 2015, 08:06:11 AM
Vermont is the official maple capital of the world...
Quebec raises their hand.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 27, 2015, 05:31:40 AM
Apr. 27, 1971,
The Grateful Dead appeared at the Fillmore East in New York City. The Beach Boys also appeared on stage with the Dead, who together performed a short set of Beach Boys songs.
http://youtu.be/X_3nYixwNn0 (http://youtu.be/X_3nYixwNn0)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on April 27, 2015, 05:58:39 AM
Vermont is the official maple capital of the world...
Quebec raises their hand.


^^^^^ this
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 27, 2015, 07:12:08 AM
1509   Pope Julius II excommunicates the Italian state of Venice.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 28, 2015, 05:38:20 AM
Apr. 28, 1982,
The California State Assembly consumer-protection-committee heard testimony from "experts" who claimed that when 'Stairway To Heaven' was played backward, contained the words: "I sing because I live with Satan. The Lord turns me off, there's no escaping it. Here's to my sweet Satan, whose power is Satan. He will give you 666. I live for Satan."
 :pope:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 28, 2015, 08:02:12 AM
1789   The crew of the HMS Bounty mutinies against Captain William Bligh.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Dan K on April 28, 2015, 11:15:36 AM
Apr. 28, 1982,
The California State Assembly consumer-protection-committee heard testimony from "experts" who claimed that when 'Stairway To Heaven' was played backward, contained the words: "I sing because I live with Satan. The Lord turns me off, there's no escaping it. Here's to my sweet Satan, whose power is Satan. He will give you 666. I live for Satan."
 :pope:

http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html]
[url]http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html (http://[url)[/url]

here's a link to a wav file of Stairway backwards.

 - Dan
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on April 28, 2015, 01:46:41 PM
Apr. 28, 1982,
The California State Assembly consumer-protection-committee heard testimony from "experts" who claimed that when 'Stairway To Heaven' was played backward, contained the words: "I sing because I live with Satan. The Lord turns me off, there's no escaping it. Here's to my sweet Satan, whose power is Satan. He will give you 666. I live for Satan."
 :pope:


[url]http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html]http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html]
[url]http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html (http://[url=http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html)[/url]

here's a link to a wav file of Stairway backwards.

 - Dan


"Goooo to church.... saaaaay your prayers.... TITHE! TITHE!!"
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on April 28, 2015, 01:56:42 PM
Apr. 28, 1982,
The California State Assembly consumer-protection-committee heard testimony from "experts" who claimed that when 'Stairway To Heaven' was played backward, contained the words: "I sing because I live with Satan. The Lord turns me off, there's no escaping it. Here's to my sweet Satan, whose power is Satan. He will give you 666. I live for Satan."
 :pope:


[url=http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html]http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html]
[url]http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html]http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html]http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html]
[url]http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html (http://[url=http://www.geocities.ws/craptacularcreations/stairway.html)[/url]

here's a link to a wav file of Stairway backwards.

 - Dan


"Goooo to church.... saaaaay your prayers.... TITHE! TITHE!!"

visitors can't see pics , please register or login
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Hodge Podge on April 28, 2015, 02:02:00 PM
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:headscratch:

:inlove:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on April 28, 2015, 02:09:30 PM
Once a Boinger, always a Boinger.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on April 28, 2015, 08:50:56 PM
Once a Boinker, always a Boinker.

ftfy
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 29, 2015, 05:20:47 AM
Apr. 29, 1913       
Gideon Sundback of Hoboken patents the all-purpose zipper.
Have you checked yours lately?
 :redface:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 29, 2015, 08:33:36 AM
1429-Joan of Arc leads French forces to victory over English at Orleans.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 29, 2015, 10:57:08 AM
The Elektromote Is Tested (1882)
Ernst Werner von Siemens demonstrated his Elektromote, the world's first trolleybus, on a 591-yard (540-m) test track in a suburb of Berlin, Germany. The trolleybus was a converted four-wheel coach equipped with two electric motors. Electric power was transmitted to the coach via a flexible cable from a small, eight-wheeled "contact car" running on the power lines above. How long was the Elektromote in operation?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on April 29, 2015, 12:36:49 PM
Duh. 591 yards.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on April 30, 2015, 05:45:47 AM
Apr. 30, 1943
The British submarine HMS Seraph drops 'the man who never was,' a dead man the British planted with false invasion plans, into the Mediterranean off the coast of Spain.
Operation Mincemeat involved the acquisition and dressing up of a human cadaver as a "Major William Martin, R.M." and putting it into the sea near Huelva, Spain. Attached to the dead body was a brief-case containing fake letters falsely stating that the Allied attack would be against Sardinia and Greece rather than Sicily, the actual point of invasion. When the body was found, with all the false pocket litter data, the Spanish Intelligence Service passed copies of the papers to the German Intelligence Service which passed them on to their High Command. The ruse was so successful that the Germans still believed that Sardinia and Greece were the intended objectives, weeks after the landings in Sicily had begun.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on April 30, 2015, 07:26:17 AM
Hitler commits suicide.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on April 30, 2015, 09:26:30 AM

1789- George Washington is inaugurated as the first U.S. president.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 01, 2015, 05:41:11 AM
Penny Black Is Issued in the UK (1840)

Before the issuance of the Penny Black—the first adhesive stamp to indicate prepayment of postage—letters were commonly paid for by their recipients. Part of an effort to reform the antiquated British postal system, the stamp featured a profile of Queen Victoria. Because its dark background made cancellation marks hard to see and made reusing stamps quite easy, it was soon redesigned. To this day, all British stamps bear a profile of the reigning monarch and are the only stamps not to list what?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on May 01, 2015, 06:14:59 AM
Quote
To this day, all British stamps bear a profile of the reigning monarch and are the only stamps not to list what?

The diseases contracted if you actually lick that nasty thing?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on May 01, 2015, 07:14:31 AM
Cost.

Sent from my XT1058

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 02, 2015, 05:12:29 AM
Here is something for you oldtimers.


Irrigation Festival
The Irrigation Festival is the oldest continuous festival in Washington, held since 1896 in Sequim. Originally known as "May Days," the festival celebrated the opening of the first ditch to bring water from the Dungeness River to the arid Sequim prairie. In the early days, there were horse races, dancing, a keg of beer hidden in the brush, and tables loaded with food. Today, thousands come for a week of activities: a grand parade, a loggers' show, a high school operetta, crafts and flower exhibits, dances, music, and the Ditchwalkers Clam and Spaghetti Dinner.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 02, 2015, 06:53:59 AM
1230 – William de Braose is hanged by Prince Llywelyn the Great.

"In this year William de Breos the Younger, lord of Brycheiniog, was hanged by the Lord Llywelyn in Gwynedd, after he had been caught in Llywelyn's chamber with the king of England's daughter, Llywelyn's wife"
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 03, 2015, 03:31:28 AM
1978 – The first unsolicited bulk commercial e-mail (which would later become known as "spam") is sent by a Digital Equipment Corporation marketing representative to every ARPANET address on the west coast of the United States
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 03, 2015, 05:30:34 AM
The Sport of Geocaching Begins (2000).  Now why isnt this on espn?  They have poker as a sport?

Geocaching is an outdoor treasure-hunting game in which participants use a Global Positioning System (GPS) to hide and seek watertight containers filled with trinkets, hoards known as "geocaches" or simply "caches." The improved accuracy of GPS devices allowed the pastime to develop, since the specific locations of the small containers could finally be logged and shared. Geocaches are now hidden in more than 100 countries and on all seven continents. What did the world's first geocache contain?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on May 03, 2015, 10:03:09 AM
What did the world's first geocache contain?

Six paperback books and a dying tree.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on May 03, 2015, 11:32:26 AM
What did the world's first geocache contain?

Six paperback books and a dying tree.
A babies arm holding an apple?

Sent from my XT1058

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 04, 2015, 06:02:44 AM
May 4, 1970       
Ohio National Guardsmen open fire on student protesters at Kent State University, killing four and wounding nine others.
Also on this day, my respect for authority died, and I became a pain in their ass.
This song still makes me weep.
 :cry:
http://youtu.be/hkg-bzTHeAk (http://youtu.be/hkg-bzTHeAk)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 04, 2015, 07:58:05 AM
1626   Indians sell Manhattan Island for $24 in cloth and buttons.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on May 04, 2015, 08:22:30 AM
1626   Indians sell Manhattan Island for $24 in cloth and buttons.


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 05, 2015, 06:03:48 AM
May 5, 1945,
The only WW II deaths of civilians on the mainland of the U.S. resulted from a Japanese bomb dropped over Gearhart Mountain, Oregon by an unmanned balloon. It was disturbed and exploded, killing those civilians who discovered it during a picnic: five local children and Elsie Mitchell, the pregnant wife of a minister. Sand in the bags of ballast carried by the balloon was scientifically identified. By microscopic study of the grains, the sand was known by its characteristics to have come from Japan. Earlier in the war, 23 Feb 1942, the mainland was first bombed, though without casualties, by shells fired from a Japanese submarine about a half-mile offshore of Ellwood, California.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 05, 2015, 06:18:23 AM
1865- The 13th Amendment is ratified, abolishing slavery.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on May 05, 2015, 08:46:19 AM
the mainland was first bombed, though without casualties, by shells fired from a Japanese submarine about a half-mile offshore of Ellwood, California.

HOLLYWOOOOOOOD!

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on May 05, 2015, 08:53:24 AM
The Sport of Geocaching Begins (2000).  Now why isnt this on espn?  They have poker as a sport?

Geocaching is an outdoor treasure-hunting game in which participants use a Global Positioning System (GPS) to hide and seek watertight containers filled with trinkets, hoards known as "geocaches" or simply "caches." The improved accuracy of GPS devices allowed the pastime to develop, since the specific locations of the small containers could finally be logged and shared. Geocaches are now hidden in more than 100 countries and on all seven continents. What did the world's first geocache contain?

Gold.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 05, 2015, 10:17:50 AM
This day in 1891 Music Hall opened in New York. In 1893 the name was changed to Carnegie Hall.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 06, 2015, 05:05:21 AM
May 6, 1965,
In their Clearwater, Florida hotel room, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards worked out the opening guitar riff of 'Satisfaction', following Richard's purchase of a Gibson fuzz-box earlier that day. The song is considered to be one of the all-time greatest rock songs ever recorded. In 2004 Rolling Stone magazine placed 'Satisfaction' in the second spot on its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, just behind "Purple People Eater".
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 06, 2015, 12:06:20 PM
Happy Birthday Robert Peary (1856)
Peary was a US naval officer and explorer who made several attempts to reach the geographic North Pole between 1898 and 1909. On April 6, 1909, accompanied by fellow explorer Matthew Henson and four Inuit men, he reached what he thought was the pole and became widely acknowledged as the first explorer to attain that goal. His claims, however, have since come into question. What factors have led experts to doubt the veracity of Peary's account of the expedition?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on May 06, 2015, 12:21:13 PM
His claims, however, have since come into question. What factors have led experts to doubt the veracity of Peary's account of the expedition?

His chapter devoted to penguins.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 06, 2015, 05:57:34 PM
 1937   The dirigible Hindenburg explodes in flames at Lakehurst, New Jersey.  Oh, The humanity!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on May 06, 2015, 07:25:05 PM
Makes for a good album cover though.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 07, 2015, 05:02:41 AM
1945 – World War II: General Alfred Jodl signs unconditional surrender terms at Reims, France, ending Germany's participation in the war. The document takes effect the next day.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 07, 2015, 05:55:47 AM
May 7, 1942       
In the Battle of the Coral Sea, Japanese and American navies attack each other with carrier-launched warplanes. It is the first time in the history of naval warfare where two fleets fought without seeing each other.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 07, 2015, 06:55:26 AM
May 7th 1915, the liner Lusitania sunk by the German submarine U20 with the loss of 1198 lives.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 08, 2015, 05:40:27 AM
May 8, 1984,
Roger Waters released his first solo album The Pros And Cons Of Hitch Hiking. The concept album, as originally envisioned by Waters in 1977, rotated around a man's thoughts during a midlife crisis, and featured guest musicians Eric Clapton on guitar, David Sanborn on saxophone and Michael Kamen on piano.
http://youtu.be/liSk8OcFQbI (http://youtu.be/liSk8OcFQbI)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on May 08, 2015, 08:00:16 AM
Saw a show on that tour. Really well done.

Sent from my XT1058

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 09, 2015, 01:26:59 AM
Yesterday was VE day.

1945 – World War II: Ratification in Berlin-Karlshorst of the German unconditional surrender of May 8 in Rheims, France, with the signatures of Marshal Georgy Zhukov for the Soviet Union, and for the Western Headquarters
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 09, 2015, 06:20:12 AM
May 9, 1941  
The German submarine U-110 is captured at sea along with its Enigma machine by the Royal Navy.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 09, 2015, 06:42:51 AM
May 9, 1941   
The German submarine U-110 is captured at sea along with its Enigma machine by the Royal Navy.
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Unlike in the film.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 09, 2015, 08:53:43 AM
1926   Explorer Richard Byrd and Floyd Bennett make the first flight over the North Pole.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 10, 2015, 05:13:06 AM
Born May 10th 1899, Frederick Austerlitz AKA Fred Astaire.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 10, 2015, 06:45:37 AM
1960   The USS Nautilus completes first circumnavigation of globe underwater.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 11, 2015, 05:23:34 AM
1960   The USS Nautilus completes first circumnavigation of globe underwater a soundstage at Seawold.

Conspiracy theories abound.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 11, 2015, 09:29:52 AM
1960   Mossad captures Adolf Eichmann in Buenos Aires.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 11, 2015, 12:08:49 PM
Born this day in 1904, Salvador Dali.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on May 11, 2015, 02:09:12 PM
1947 - B.F. Goodrich Co. announces development of tubeless tire

The culmination of more than three years of engineering, Goodrich’s tubeless tire effectively eliminated the inner tube, trapping the pressurized air within the tire walls themselves. By reinforcing those walls, the company claimed, they were able to combine the puncture-sealing features of inner tubes with an improved ease of riding, high resistance to bruising and superior retention of air pressure. While Goodrich awaited approval from the U.S. Patent Office, the tubeless tires underwent high-speed road testing, were put in service on a fleet of taxis and were used by Ohio state police cars and a number of privately owned passenger cars.

The testing proved successful, and in 1952, Goodrich won patents for the tire’s various features. Within three years, the tubeless tire came standard on most new automobiles. According to an article published in The New York Times in December 1954, “If the results of tests…prove valid in general use, the owner of a 1955 automobile can count on at least 25 per cent more mileage, easier tire changing if he gets caught on a lonely road with a leaky tire, and almost no blowouts.” The article quoted Howard N. Hawkes, vice president and general manager of the tire division of the United States Rubber Company, as calling the general adoption of the tubeless tire “one of the most far-reaching changes ever to take place in the tire industry.”
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on May 11, 2015, 02:25:26 PM
Born this day in 1904, Salvador Dali.


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 12, 2015, 05:30:10 AM
May 12, 1967,
Pink Floyd appeared at the Queen Elizabeth Hall, London, giving a special concert Games For May - Space Age Relaxation For The Climate Of Spring. This was reportedly the first show to include loudspeakers placed at the back of the hall to give a 'sound in the round', ie quadraphonic, effect. The sound system, developed by EMI technicians, was stolen after the show and not recovered for some years.

I still have a quad album "Dark Side of the Moon" by EMI.
 :gerg:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 12, 2015, 02:32:44 PM
May 12, 1967,
Pink Floyd appeared at the Queen Elizabeth Hall, London, giving a special concert Games For May - Space Age Relaxation For The Climate Of Spring. This was reportedly the first show to include loudspeakers placed at the back of the hall to give a 'sound in the round', ie quadraphonic, effect. The sound system, developed by EMI technicians, was stolen after the show and not recovered for some years.

I still have a quad album "Dark Side of the Moon" by EMI.
 :gerg:

Hippie.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 13, 2015, 01:00:02 PM
In case anyone was wondering what the google site was showing.

Inge Lehmann ForMemRS (May 13, 1888 – February 21, 1993) was a Danish seismologist and geophysicist who postulated the Earth's inner core.[2][3] In 1936, she theorized from existing seismic data the existence of an inner core with physical properties distinct from the outer core's and that Earth's core is not a single molten sphere. Seismologists, who had not been able to propose a workable hypothesis for the observation that the P-wave created by earthquakes slowed down when it reached certain areas of the inner Earth, quickly accepted her conclusion
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 13, 2015, 02:09:20 PM
May 13, 1637
The table knife was created by Cardinal Richelieu in France. Until this time, daggers were used to cut meat, as well as to pick one's teeth. Richelieu had the points rounded off all of the knives to be used at his table
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on May 13, 2015, 02:58:46 PM
May 13, 1637
The table knife was created by Cardinal Richelieu in France.


"I sure did that thing."

http://youtu.be/txgnWWl8hgk (http://youtu.be/txgnWWl8hgk)


Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 14, 2015, 05:38:50 AM
May 14, 1850,
 The first U.S. patent for a dishwashing machine was issued to Joel Houghton of Ogden, NY, for an "Improvement in Machines for Washing Table Furniture" (No.7,365). Its design had a cylindrical wire basket to contain the dishes in a tub of boiling water which contained beaters turned by a handle to move the water against the tableware in the basket. The cylinder could also be rotated to expose its contents evenly to the action of the churning water. The first patent on a dishwasher that became commerically successful was issued on 28 Dec1886 to Josephine Cochrane. She began a company supplying her machines to restaurants and hotels, which continued after her death, and years later led to the "KichenAid" brand of home dishwashers.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 14, 2015, 07:28:43 AM
1998 - Last episode of Seinfeld on NBC (commercials are $2M for 30 seconds)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 14, 2015, 09:32:07 AM
Skylab Is Launched (1973)

Launched into orbit in 1973, Skylab was the first US space station. It carried a laboratory for studying the human body's adaptation to weightlessness and a powerful solar telescope. Three successive astronaut crews conducted research aboard Skylab for a total of 171 days in 1973–74. Though Skylab was intended to be reused, increased solar activity caused its orbit to degrade faster than expected. In 1979, the 75-tonne station reentered Earth's atmosphere and broke up. Where did the debris land?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 15, 2015, 03:33:08 AM
1800 – King George III of the United Kingdom survives an assassination attempt by James Hadfield, who is later acquitted by reason of insanity.

This is one of the most important trials of an insane man in history, if not the most important. Hadfield was a veteran of the battle of Ramillies, where he received a serious head injury. He came to develop the delusion that he had to die in order to save the world. Reasoning that he would be executed if he assasinated the king, he tried to shoot him in a theatre. He missed, as the king bowed to the audience.

There was huge public sympathy for Hafield (King George had bouts of madeness) and the 1800 Lunatics Act was passed in 10 days, to allow hin to be sent to hospital rather than hanged. The rest of the Western world followed suit. The defence of not guilty by reason of insanity became available.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 15, 2015, 03:58:18 AM
1817 – Opening of the first private mental health hospital in the United States, the Asylum for the Relief of Persons Deprived of the Use of Their Reason (now Friends Hospital) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 15, 2015, 05:34:47 AM
May 15, 1975
Eight U. S. Air Force helicopters carry a force of U. S. Marines in an assault on Cambodia’s Koh Tang island in an attempt to rescue the crew of Mayaguez; three are shot down. U. S. Navy Grumman A-6 Intruder and A-7E Corsair II bombers and McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II fighters from the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) strike Ream airfield and targets at Kompong Som in Cambodia. The Khmer Rouge subsequently releases the Mayaguez crew, which actually was being held at Rong Som Lem island. Ooops.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 15, 2015, 08:00:12 AM
1963   The last Project Mercury space flight, carrying Gordon Cooper, is launched.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on May 15, 2015, 08:19:18 AM
1800 – King George III of the United Kingdom survives an assassination attempt by James Hadfield, who is later acquitted by reason of insanity.


James then goes on to form Metallica.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on May 15, 2015, 08:20:34 AM
1800 – King George III of the United Kingdom survives an assassination attempt by James Hadfield, who is later acquitted by reason of insanity.


James then goes on to form Metallica.

This explains a lot.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 15, 2015, 11:06:14 AM
Today in 1567, the Christening of Claudio Monteverdi. He went on to compose Orfeo, though to be the first opera.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 16, 2015, 05:33:55 AM
May 16, 1965,
Driving away from a gig at the Civic Hall, Long Beach, California, the limo taking the Rolling Stones back to their hotel was besieged by fans who caved in the roof by standing on it. The band attempted to hold the roof up while their chauffeur drove off with bodies falling onto the road.
...and those were the fans!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on May 16, 2015, 07:02:00 AM
Rock and roll baby, rock and roll.

(o\_!_/o)

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 17, 2015, 06:27:11 PM
This day in 1943 Operation Chastise carried out by 617 Squadron of the RAF, AKA The Dambusters.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 18, 2015, 04:49:29 AM
1652 – Rhode Island passes the first law in English-speaking North America making slavery illegal.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 18, 2015, 05:20:31 AM
Jackie Cochran: First Woman to Break Sound Barrier (1953)

A pioneering American aviator, Cochran was the first woman to break the sound barrier and, in 1961, to fly at twice that speed. She was also the first woman to fly in the Bendix transcontinental race, which she won in 1938, a few years after her initial attempt. During WWII, she trained female transport pilots in the British and US Air Force auxiliaries and became the first woman to pilot a bomber across the Atlantic. A successful entrepreneur, Cochran learned to fly to promote her line of what?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 18, 2015, 05:53:04 AM
^^^Lady paint.

May 18, 1974,
Ray Stevens started a three week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with the novelty song 'The Streak' which capitalized on the then popular craze of streaking.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on May 18, 2015, 06:16:24 AM
May 18, 1974,
Ray Stevens started a three week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with the novelty song 'The Streak' which capitalized on the then popular craze of streaking.
Yeah, whatever happened to that? How come no one streaks anymore?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on May 18, 2015, 07:09:49 AM
A successful entrepreneur, Cochran learned to fly to promote her line of what?

Crotchless panties. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on May 18, 2015, 07:35:57 AM

May 18, 1974,
Ray Stevens started a three week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with the novelty song 'The Streak' which capitalized on the then popular craze of streaking.
Yeah, whatever happened to that? How come no one streaks anymore?

The obesity epidemic would be my guess.


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 19, 2015, 02:30:17 PM
May 19, 1978
McDonnell Douglas delivers its 5,000th F-4 Phantom II aircraft, twenty years after the first flight of the prototype.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on May 19, 2015, 07:05:10 PM
May 19, 1978
McDonnell Douglas delivers its 5,000th F-4 Phantom II aircraft, twenty years after the first flight of the prototype.
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F4E slick. I worked on those in the 70's-80's. Scars to prove it. Pilots loved'em, maintenance hated'em.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 20, 2015, 03:37:45 AM
May 20, 1775   North Carolina becomes the first colony to declare its independence.
May 20, 1861   North Carolina becomes the last state to secede from the Union.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 20, 2015, 08:00:30 AM
1774   Parliament passes the Coercive Acts to punish the colonists for their increasingly anti-British behavior. The acts close the port of Boston.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 21, 2015, 08:00:37 AM
1881 American Red Cross founded

1901 Connecticut enacts first speed-limit law  On this day in 1901, Connecticut becomes the first state to pass a law regulating motor vehicles, limiting their speed to 12 mph in cities and 15 mph on country roads.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 21, 2015, 08:15:00 AM
996 -  Sixteen year old Otto III is crowned the Roman Emperor.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 21, 2015, 08:54:57 AM
1936 – Sada Abe is arrested after wandering the streets of Tokyo for days with her dead lover's severed genitals in her handbag. Her story soon becomes one of Japan's most notorious scandals.

Sada Abe (阿部 定 Abe Sada?, May 28, 1905 – after 1970) was a Japanese woman who is remembered for erotically asphyxiating her lover, Kichizo Ishida (石田 吉蔵 Ishida Kichizō?), on May 18, 1936, and then cutting off his penis and testicles and carrying them around with her in her handbag. The story became a national sensation in Japan, acquiring mythic overtones, and has since been interpreted by artists, philosophers, novelists and filmmakers
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on May 21, 2015, 10:58:20 AM
May 21, 2014, My youngest (daughter) moved out of my house, starting the period of 'empty-nest' that lasted 5 months before some returned to the nest.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 22, 2015, 06:26:29 AM
1967   The children's program Mister Rogers' Neighborhood premiers.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on May 22, 2015, 03:59:30 PM
May 22, 1980, Pac-Man is introduced in Japanese arcades.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 23, 2015, 02:06:11 AM
The battle of Ramillies was won against the French Alliance, by the Grand Alliance army commanded by the Duke of Marlborough, bringing the French to make peace.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on May 23, 2015, 04:54:22 AM
1934

 Bonnie and Clyde The Barrow gang is ambushed and killed while headed to their Bienville Parish, Louisiana, hideout.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 23, 2015, 06:16:06 AM
1701   Captain William Kidd, the Scottish pirate, is hanged on the banks of the Thames.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 23, 2015, 02:04:27 PM
May 23, 1969
A drunken U.S. Air Force assistant crew chief, Sgt. Paul Adams Meyer, 23, of Poquoson, Virginia, suffering anxiety over marital problems, starts up a Lockheed C-130E Hercules, 63-7789, c/n 3856, of the 36th Tactical Airlift Squadron, 316th Tactical Airlift Wing, on hardstand 21 at RAF Mildenhall and takes off in it at 0655 hrs. CET, headed for Langley AFB, Virginia. At least two North American F-100 Super Sabres from RAF Lakenheath, a C-130 from Mildenhall, and two RAF English Electric Lightnings are sent aloft to try to make contact with the stolen aircraft. The Hercules crashes into the English Channel off Alderney (5000N, 0205W) ~90 minutes later. In the last transmission from Meyer, to his wife, in a link-up over the side-band radio, he stated "Leave me alone for about five minutes, I've got trouble." There is speculation whether the Hercules was shot down. Some wreckage was recovered but the pilot's body was never found. Meyer had been arrested for being drunk and disorderly earlier in the morning in the village of Freckenham and had been remanded to quarters, but sneaked out to steal the Hercules. Women.  :shrug:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 23, 2015, 02:33:37 PM
May 23rd 1906, death of Henrik Ibsen.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 23, 2015, 03:05:48 PM
60th Eurovision song contest. Watch it, it's hilarious.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 24, 2015, 05:23:21 AM
1607 – One hundred English settlers disembark in Jamestown, the first English colony in America.

So begins modrn America, with a bunch of thieves and murderers, not the "nice" pilgrim fathers.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 24, 2015, 05:54:37 AM
This day in 1941, HMS Hood sunk by the Bismark. Only 3 of the crew survive.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 24, 2015, 05:56:23 AM
This day in 1941, HMS Hood sunk by the Bismark. Only 3 of the crew survive.

The most beautiful of warships.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on May 24, 2015, 05:56:38 AM
This day in 1941, HMS Hood sunk by the Bismark. Only 3 of the crew survive.

Lucky shot.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 24, 2015, 06:07:55 AM
This day in 1941, HMS Hood sunk by the Bismark. Only 3 of the crew survive.

Lucky shot.

Desperately unlucky I'd say.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on May 24, 2015, 06:20:27 AM
This day in 1941, HMS Hood sunk by the Bismark. Only 3 of the crew survive.

Lucky shot.

Desperately unlucky I'd say.

Good is evil. Evil is good.

It's all a matter of perspective.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 24, 2015, 06:37:58 AM
1543   Nicolaus Copernicus publishes proof of a sun-centered solar system. He dies just after publication.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on May 24, 2015, 06:44:36 AM
1543   Nicolaus Copernicus publishes proof of a sun-centered solar system. He dies just after publication.

Lucky shot.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 25, 2015, 03:49:54 AM
I know you've all been on tenterhooks, waiting to hear how this Luther business ended.

1521 – The Diet of Worms ends when Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, issues the Edict of Worms, declaring Martin Luther an outlaw.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 25, 2015, 06:50:09 AM
 1925- John Scopes is indicted for teaching Darwinian theory in school.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on May 25, 2015, 01:08:41 PM
This day in 1941, HMS Hood sunk by the Bismark. Only 3 of the crew survive.

Lucky shot.

Desperately unlucky I'd say.

Depends whether the shell is travelling away from, or towards you.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on May 26, 2015, 12:01:55 PM
Quote
On this day in 1927, Henry Ford and his son Edsel drive the 15 millionth Model T Ford out of their factory, marking the famous automobile’s official last day of production.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/last-day-of-model-t-production-at-ford (http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/last-day-of-model-t-production-at-ford)

It's also John Wayne's birthday. He was twenty when the last Model T was rolled out the door.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 26, 2015, 09:07:30 PM
Other birthdays

Sally ride
Stevie nicks
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 28, 2015, 04:47:23 AM
The Battle of Halys (585 BCE)

Also known as the Battle of the Eclipse, the Battle of Halys was fought between the Medes and the Lydians in 585 BCE at the Halys River in what is now Turkey. The final battle of a 15-year war between Alyattes II of Lydia and Cyaxares of Media, the fight ended abruptly due to a total solar eclipse, which was perceived as an omen that the gods wanted the war to end. After a truce, the river was declared the border of the two nations. How is the exact date of the ancient battle known?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on May 28, 2015, 06:29:57 AM
The eclipse.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 28, 2015, 07:39:57 AM
1830   Congress authorizes Indian removal from all states to the western Prairie.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 29, 2015, 08:18:16 AM
1953   Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay become the first men to reach the top of Mount Everest.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on May 30, 2015, 08:13:32 AM
1889   The brassiere is invented.

1431   Joan of Arc is burned at the stake by the English.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on May 31, 2015, 12:40:49 PM
This day in 1809 Joseph Haydn, known as the father of the symphony, died.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on May 31, 2015, 05:38:49 PM
Johnstown Flood Kills 2,209 (1889)


When the South Fork Dam near Johnstown, Pennsylvania, collapsed after several days of heavy rains, it sent 20 million tons (18.1 million cubic meters) of water cascading downriver at speeds of 20–40 mph (30–60 km/h). Less than an hour after the breach, a 30-foot (9-m) wall of water smashed into Johnstown, killing more than 2,200 people. The American Red Cross's response was one of its first major disaster relief efforts. Why did some blame the South Fork Fishing and Hunting Club for the tragedy?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on May 31, 2015, 06:23:37 PM
May 31, 1971,
36 Grateful Dead fans were medically treated after unknowingly drinking L.S.D. laced cider, at a gig in the US.
Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
e.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on May 31, 2015, 06:43:28 PM
Fuckin' hippies.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: mxvet57 on May 31, 2015, 09:49:41 PM
Fuckin' hippies.


You should know.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 01, 2015, 04:26:50 AM
June 1, 1966
 During a 12 hour session at Abbey Road studios, The Beatles added overdubs on 'Yellow Submarine', with John Lennon blowing bubbles in a bucket of water and shouting "Full speed ahead Mister Captain!" Roadie Mal Evans played on a bass drum strapped to his chest, marching around the studio with The Beatles following behind (conga-line style) singing "We all live in a yellow submarine."
That, children, is pop-not-rock n' roll.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 01, 2015, 06:49:00 AM
Slow news day.
1533   Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII's new queen, is crowned.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on June 01, 2015, 07:26:10 AM
You missed this.

Marilyn Monroe (1926)

Monroe was an American actress, world-famous sex symbol, and cultural icon. The onetime model made her screen debut in 1948 and was at first patronized by critics, but she studied acting and eventually won more challenging roles. Her private life, including her marriages to baseball star Joe DiMaggio and playwright Arthur Miller, has been subject to intense scrutiny, and her death from a barbiturate overdose at age 36 only increased her mystique. Why was her childhood particularly tumultuous?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 02, 2015, 06:05:33 AM
June 2, 1986,
The greatest distance achieved by a hang-glider is made by American Randy Haney who flies an unpowered hang-glider 199.75 miles (321.47 km) from his takeoff point at Mount 7 in Golden, B.C. (Canada, eh) to Whitefish, Montana.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on June 02, 2015, 07:06:29 AM
Today he would have been shot down.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on June 02, 2015, 07:06:43 AM
Bare-Knuckle Fighter Dies After 99-Round Fight (1833)


In 1830, bare-knuckle prizefighter Simon Byrne, Ireland's heavyweight boxing champion, fought Alexander McKay, the "Champion of Scotland," for the right to challenge England's heavyweight champ. McKay died of a head injury shortly after losing the lengthy fight, and Byrne was charged but later cleared of manslaughter. Three years later, Byrne fought England's champion, James Burke. After 3 hours and 99 rounds, Byrne was knocked out. He died days later. What became of Burke after the fatal fight?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on June 02, 2015, 07:07:30 AM
Happy Birthday Martha Washington (1731)


Martha Washington was the wife of first US president George Washington. They married in 1759, nearly two years after the death of her first husband, Daniel Parke Custis. During the American Revolution, she spent winters in army camps with her husband and organized a women's sewing circle to mend clothes for the troops. Although the title was not coined until after her death, she is considered the first "First Lady" of the US. She is also the only woman whose portrait has appeared on what?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 02, 2015, 08:10:34 AM
1924   The United States grants full citizenship to American Indians. :lol:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on June 03, 2015, 10:14:07 AM
Edward White Becomes First American to Conduct a Spacewalk (1965)


The first spacewalk by an American astronaut was conducted by Edward White during NASA's Gemini IV mission, which was itself the first multi-day space flight undertaken by the US. Assisted and photographed by fellow astronaut James McDivitt and tethered to the spacecraft for safety, White floated in space for 22 minutes. His spacewalk occurred just months after Russian cosmonaut Alexey Leonov executed the first ever extravehicular activity. How did White describe his reentry of the craft?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on June 03, 2015, 12:47:07 PM
1924   The United States grants full citizenship to American Indians. :lol:

Thank Earth Mother we didn't reciprocate. :P
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 04, 2015, 05:30:07 AM
 June 4, 1972
The USAF Thunderbirds suffer their first fatal crash at an air show during Transpo 72 at Dulles International Airport. Major Joe Howard flying Thunderbird 3, McDonnell Douglas F-4E-32-MC Phantom II, 66-0321, experiences a loss of power during a vertical manoeuver, and breaks out of the formation just after it completes a wedge roll and was ascending at ~2,500 feet AGL. The aircraft staggers and then descends in a flat attitude with little forward speed. Although Major Howard ejects as the aircraft falls back to earth from ~ 1,500 feet slightly nose low, and descends under a good C-9 canopy, winds blow him into the ascending fireball. The parachute melts and the pilot plummets 200 feet, sustaining fatal injuries in fall.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 04, 2015, 08:12:14 AM
1940   British complete the evacuation of 300,000 troops at Dunkirk.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 04, 2015, 12:25:22 PM
Our best defeat
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 05, 2015, 09:54:56 AM
1968  Sirhan Sirhan shoots Democratic presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy after Kennedy’s victory in the pivotal California primary election.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on June 06, 2015, 04:11:01 AM
This day in 1944, Allied forces land on the beaches of Normandy.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on June 06, 2015, 05:44:49 AM
On this day in 1966:


I was born.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 06, 2015, 05:48:17 AM
June 6, 1813
The United States invasion of Canada is halted at Stony Creek, Ontario.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on June 06, 2015, 07:45:46 AM
On this day in 1966:


I was born.

Woohoo! Happy Birthday Rob!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on June 06, 2015, 08:47:32 AM
First Drive-In Theater Opens in New Jersey (1933)


The drive-in theater was the creation of New Jersey chemical company magnate Richard M. Hollingshead, Jr. In 1932, Hollingshead nailed a screen to trees in his backyard and set a projector on the hood of his car. After applying for a patent for his creation, Hollingshead opened the first drive-in the next year. Though it only operated for three years, the concept soon caught on in other states. How many drive-ins are estimated to have existed in the US at the height of their popularity?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on June 06, 2015, 08:48:03 AM
On this day in 1966:


I was born.

Happy birthday pops :gerg:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on June 06, 2015, 08:56:08 AM
On this day in 1966:


I was born.


Wrong thread.

http://www.sport-touring.org/index.php?topic=187.0 (http://www.sport-touring.org/index.php?topic=187.0)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 06, 2015, 09:56:40 AM
Kind of a big day.

1944  D-Day: Operation Overlord lands 400,000 Allied American, British, and Canadian troops on the beaches of Normandy in German-occupied France.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 06, 2015, 09:58:34 AM
This day in 1944, Allied forces land on the beaches of Normandy.

Oops, I didn't notice this, when I posted above.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on June 06, 2015, 10:42:03 AM
This day in 1944, Allied forces land on the beaches of Normandy.

Oops, I didn't notice this, when I posted above.

And you forgot to mention the free French.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on June 06, 2015, 12:10:45 PM
Born this day in 1857, Edward Elgar, composer and moustache owner.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on June 06, 2015, 12:12:06 PM
On this day in 1966:


I was born.


Wrong thread.

[url]http://www.sport-touring.org/index.php?topic=187.0[/url] ([url]http://www.sport-touring.org/index.php?topic=187.0[/url])


I see what you did there.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on June 06, 2015, 12:45:02 PM
On this day in 1966:


I was born.


Wrong thread.

[url]http://www.sport-touring.org/index.php?topic=187.0[/url] ([url]http://www.sport-touring.org/index.php?topic=187.0[/url])


I see what you did there.


Eyesight is still good. Can't be that old.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 08, 2015, 07:59:56 AM
1966 -Gemini astronaut Gene Cernan attempts to become the first man to orbit the Earth untethered to a space capsule, but is unable to when he exhausts himself fitting into his rocket pack.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on June 08, 2015, 12:37:25 PM
1966 -Gemini astronaut Gene Cernan attempts to become the first man to orbit the Earth untethered to a space capsule, but is unable to when he exhausts himself fitting into his rocket pack.

And he was the last man to walk on the moon.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 08, 2015, 01:23:52 PM
June 8, 1966
During a publicity photo formation flight, a Lockheed F-104N Starfighter, N813NA, flown by NASA Chief Research Test Pilot Joseph A.Walker, was caught in the wingtip vortices of the North American Aviation XB-70A-2 Valkyrie, 62-0207, the second prototype Mach 3+ strategic bomber. The Starfighter rolled up and across the Valkyrie. The two airplanes collided, with the F-104 taking off the Valkyrie’s vertical fins, then exploding.
The B-70’s pilot, Alvin S. White, was able to eject, though he was severely injured. Joe Walker and B-70 co-pilot Major Carl S. Cross, United States Air Force, were killed.
Still photographs and motion picture film of the formation were being taken from Clay Lacy’s Gates Lear Jet. The photos were for a General Electric publicity campaign showing U.S. military aircraft that were powered by GE engines. Air Force procedures for requesting and approval of publicity flights were not properly followed and it is likely this flight would not have been approved had they been.
Reportedly, just prior to the collision, Walker radioed, “I’m opposing this mission. It is too turbulent and it has no scientific value.”
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Stickman on June 08, 2015, 01:29:30 PM
Here’s one you probably never heard of, and when you get done reading, you probably hope you never hear of again.  Iceland is the 18th largest island in the world.  Quiet, seemingly sleepy and peaceful place known mainly for the fishing trade, its beautiful hot springs, friendly people.  It is also a highly geologically active country with many volcanoes (hence the hot springs).  Ever hear of the Laki?  Well the Laki or Lakagigar (Craters of Laki) is a volcanic fissure situated in the south of Iceland.  On this day in 1783, this fissure, and it’s associated 130 craters, erupted over an 8 month period during 1783-1784, pouring out an estimated 3.4 cubic miles of basalt lava and clouds of poisonous hydrofluoric acid/sulfur dioxide compounds.  This deadly combination killed over 50% of Iceland's livestock population, leading to famine which killed approximately 25% of the human population.  Moreover, the Laki eruption and its aftermath has been estimated to have conrtibuted to the deaths of over six million people globally, making it the deadliest volcanic eruption in history. The drop in temperatures, due to the sulfuric dioxide gases spewed into the northern hemisphere, caused crop failures in Europe, droughts in India, and Japan’s worst famine.  An estimated 120,000,000 tons of sulfur dioxide was emitted, about three times the total annual European industrial output in 2006. This outpouring of sulfur dioxide during unusual weather conditions caused a thick haze to spread across western Europe, resulting in many thousands of deaths throughout 1783 and the winter of 1784. In North America, the winter of 1784 was the longest and one of the coldest on record. It was the longest period of below-zero temperatures in New England, the largest accumulation of snow in New Jersey, and the longest freezing over of the Chesapeake Bay. There was ice skating in Charleston Harbor, a huge snowstorm hit the south, the Mississippi River froze at New Orleans, and there was ice in the Gulf of Mexico.  There is evidence that the Laki eruption had other effects beyond Europe.  Weakened African and Indian monsoon circulations lead to a drastic drop in daily precipitation over Africa, resulting in, among other effects, low flow in the River Nile.  The resulting famine that afflicted Egypt in 1784 cost it roughly one-sixth of its population.   Just can’t mess with Mother nature……no matter where she may be.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on June 08, 2015, 01:43:04 PM
Riding Iceland is on my bucket list.  ;)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Stickman on June 08, 2015, 01:54:43 PM
I was there once in August of 1987.  Had a Bianchi touring bike and rode from one end of Reykjavik to the other. Also bought a sweater and drank a Jagermeister (no alcohol in it, codeine was the intoxicant).  Good times.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 09, 2015, 05:46:20 AM
June 9, 1978,
The Rolling Stones released Some Girls, their first studio album recorded with Ronnie Wood as a full member. The album cover was designed by Peter Corriston and featured The Rolling Stones in garish drag alongside select female celebrities and lingerie ads. The cover immediately ran into trouble when Lucille Ball, Farrah Fawcett, Liza Minnelli (representing her mother Judy Garland), Raquel Welch, and the estate of Marilyn Monroe threatened legal action.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 09, 2015, 07:18:45 AM
1863- At the Battle of Brandy Station in Virginia, Union and Confederate cavalries clash in the largest cavalry battle of the Civil War.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 10, 2015, 08:17:18 AM
1925  Tennessee adopts a new biology text book denying the theory of evolution.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 10, 2015, 11:00:34 AM
1925  Tennessee adopts a new biology text book denying the theory of evolution.

Good grief. Does anybody reproduce there?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: redbandit14 on June 10, 2015, 11:50:07 AM
1925  Tennessee adopts a new biology text book denying the theory of evolution.
Is it safe to assume it's still in circulation?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Black Hills on June 10, 2015, 12:49:45 PM
1925  Tennessee adopts a new biology text book denying the theory of evolution.

Good grief. Does anybody reproduce there?

only if they are related.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 11, 2015, 05:55:20 AM
June 11, 1991,
The first crash involving a Bell-Boeing Osprey occurs when the fifth MV-22, BuNo 163915, three minutes into its maiden flight at a Boeing flight test facility at Wilmington, Delaware, suffers problems with the gyros due to incorrect wiring in the flight-control system and crashes into the ground from a 15-foot (4.6 metre) hover during an attempted landing, the left rotor striking first, the airframe turning over and catching fire. Two crew eject and survive. Two of the three roll-rate gyros had been wired in reverse. "To compound the problem, the flight control built-in test was not run before the flight. With the flight control voting logic discounting the correct gyro signal, the aircraft was doomed." As this airframe was heavily damaged on its acceptance flight, it never officially entered service. This airframe had been slated for avionics integration, autopilot, aircrew training, and operational evaluation.
http://youtu.be/VYeLishJ_Js (http://youtu.be/VYeLishJ_Js)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Downs on June 11, 2015, 11:56:21 AM
Quote
Two crew eject and survive.

I currently work on this airframe.  No ejection seats, if it had them I'd work on them though my MOS.  I assume they meant two crew were ejected from the aircraft.  As in thrown out.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 11, 2015, 02:25:39 PM
I'm assuming the first prototype builds would accommodate ejection for initial flight trials, but I've no direct knowledge.
"Uninitiated" ejection , would be a miraculous survival.  :eek:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Downs on June 11, 2015, 05:47:51 PM
Ejections seats wouldn't work on this platform.  In helicopter mode you probably wouldn't clear the rotors if you were moving forward.  And you'd be leaving your crew chiefs behind in the back to plummet to their death.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 12, 2015, 06:04:38 AM
June 12, 1999
Russian Air Force Sukhoi Su-30MK-1 demonstrator '01' with vectored thrust crashes on opening day of the Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport. At the completion of a downward spiralling maneuver, the tail contacted the grass surface. With almost no forward speed the fighter was able to pull away from the ground, wings level, with an up pitch of 10-15 degrees and climb to ~150 feet (46 m), with the right jet nozzle deflected fully up and flames engulfing the left engine. Sukhoi test pilot Vyacheslav Averynov initiated ejection with navigator Vladimir Shendrikh departing the aircraft first. The Zvezda K-36D-3.5 ejection seats work perfectly and both crew descend on a taxiway unhurt. The Su-30 impacted some distance from the crew.
http://youtu.be/Yh-kuztsE1s (http://youtu.be/Yh-kuztsE1s)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 12, 2015, 06:11:55 AM
1967  The Supreme Court rules that states cannot ban interracial marriages.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on June 14, 2015, 03:12:22 AM
This day in 1777, the Stars and Stripes adopted as the flag of the United States.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 14, 2015, 05:36:35 AM
June 14, 1642       
Massachusetts passes the first compulsory education law in the colonies.
Some of 'em still don't know somethin'.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on June 14, 2015, 05:45:53 AM
June 14th 1940, German troops occupy Paris.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 14, 2015, 06:34:02 AM
1381 The Peasant’s Revolt, led by Wat Tyler, climaxes when rebels plunder and burn the Tower of London and kill the Archbishop of Canterbury.

The king, Richard 11 who was aged 14, promises to meet all of the demands of the rebellion, which had been sparked by heavy taxes, rising rents and a new poll tax, together with general misbehaviour of those at the top. Wat Tyler is killed when the king came out to meet him a few days later. Richard manages to persuade the rebels to disperse, then reneges on the agreements and hunts down and executes as many as he can. The people of London are so appalled by the stench of the corpses of those executed that they start to take them down off the city gates, walls and London Bridge. The king has them put up again.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 15, 2015, 05:23:49 AM
June 15, 1946,
The Navy's new Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, gives its first public performance at Craig Field in Jacksonville, Florida.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 15, 2015, 03:22:08 PM
800 years ago today Magna Carta was sealed. In case you missed class that day click me. (https://youtu.be/7xo4tUMdAMw).



Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 16, 2015, 05:46:40 AM
June 16, 1903,
Pepsi-Cola Co. registered the Pepsi-Cola trademark with the U.S. Patent Office. Pharmacies at the time were favorite gathering places. To increase business at his store's soda fountain, pharmacist Caleb D. Bradham created a soft drink. In the summer of 1898, he mixed carbonated water, sugar, vanilla, oils, pepsin, and kola nut extract. Customers at in his pharmacy in New Bern, N.C., liked the beverage and called it Brad's Drink. As its popularity grew, Bradham changed the name to Pepsi-Cola. The name emphasized the pepsin and kola nut extract it contained for their supposed health benefits. Pepsin, an enzyme, was thought to aid in digestion, and caffeine, an alkaloid found in kola nuts, was believed to bestow beneficial energy.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 16, 2015, 06:58:01 AM
455     Rome is sacked by the Vandal army.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on June 16, 2015, 02:14:14 PM
Born June 16th 1890, Stan Laurel.

Sent from my SM-G900F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 16, 2015, 02:17:05 PM
1816 – At the Villa Diodati, Lord Byron reads Fantasmagoriana to his four house guests — Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Claire Clairmont, and John Polidori — and challenges each guest to write a ghost story, which culminates in Mary Shelley writing the novel Frankenstein, John Polidori writing the short story The Vampyre, and Byron writing the poem Darkness.

Leading to the entire horror genre.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 16, 2015, 02:46:26 PM
1798 – United Irishmen Rebellion: British regulars arrive in Dublin; Rebels march to Tinahely, Co Wicklow.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on June 17, 2015, 06:46:53 AM
1885
Statue of Liberty arrives in New York Harbor

On this day in 1885, the dismantled State of Liberty, a gift of friendship from the people of France to the people of America, arrives in New York Harbor after being shipped across the Atlantic Ocean in 350 individual pieces packed in more than 200 cases. The copper and iron statue, which was reassembled and dedicated the following year in a ceremony presided over by U.S. President Grover Cleveland, became known around the world as an enduring symbol of freedom and democracy.


1972 
Nixon’s re-election employees are arrested for burglary

Five burglars are arrested in the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office and apartment complex in Washington, D.C. James McCord, Frank Sturgis, Bernard Barker, Virgilio Gonzalez, and Eugenio Martinez were apprehended in the early morning after a security guard at the Watergate noticed that several doors leading from...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 17, 2015, 07:43:17 AM
1775-Bunker Hill

1631 – Mumtaz Mahal dies during childbirth. Her husband, Mughal emperor Shah Jahan I, will spend the next 17 years building her mausoleum, the Taj Mahal.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on June 17, 2015, 10:09:36 AM
1972 
Nixon’s re-election employees are arrested for burglary

Five burglars are arrested in the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office and apartment complex in Washington, D.C. James McCord, Frank Sturgis, Bernard Barker, Virgilio Gonzalez, and Eugenio Martinez were apprehended in the early morning after a security guard at the Watergate noticed that several doors leading from...

The Chief Operator of which was G. Gordon Liddy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._Gordon_Liddy

After five of Liddy's operatives were arrested inside the DNC offices on June 17, 1972, subsequent investigations of the Watergate scandal led to Nixon's resignation in 1974. Liddy was convicted of burglary, conspiracy and refusing to testify to the Senate committee investigating Watergate. He served nearly fifty-two months in federal prisons.

[Word is that he left the slammer with the respect of his fellow prisoners. Not only did he refuse to rat out anyone, he is rumored to have broken out of his prison cell regularly, under cover of night, to access copy machines and other office supplies to aid in his legal battle.]
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 17, 2015, 11:33:53 AM
1800 - Birth of William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse; astronomer and telescope constructor, in York
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: xsrider on June 17, 2015, 05:48:08 PM
June 17, 1994    Millions of Americans watch former football player O.J. Simpson–facing murder charges–drive his Ford Bronco through Los Angeles, followed by police.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 17, 2015, 11:31:50 PM
1815 – Napoleonic Wars: The Battle of Waterloo results in the defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte by the Duke of Wellington and Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher forcing him to abdicate the throne of France for the second and last time.

And thus, arguably, ended the very first world war.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on June 17, 2015, 11:53:14 PM
Edward I (Longshanks), King of England (1272-1307), was born today.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 18, 2015, 05:25:03 AM
June 18, 1942
Happy Birthday, Sir Paul McCartney.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on June 18, 2015, 05:41:51 AM
June 18, 1942
Happy Birthday, Sir Paul McCartney.


Isn't that the same year the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 18, 2015, 10:20:51 AM
1815 - Battle of Waterloo, when British forces, under the command of the Duke of Wellington, a Dubliner, defeat Napoleon’s forces. The Iron Duke wasn’t the only Irish presence on the day — Napoleon’s horse Marengo was reared in Co. Wexford, and the Duke of Wellington’s mount was from Co. Cork
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 18, 2015, 01:47:53 PM
1815 - Battle of Waterloo, when British forces, under the command of the Duke of Wellington, a Dubliner, defeat Napoleon’s forces. The Iron Duke wasn’t the only Irish presence on the day — Napoleon’s horse Marengo was reared in Co. Wexford, and the Duke of Wellington’s mount was from Co. Cork

He was Anglo-Irish. That is, English, from a minor noble family probably enobled by Henry V11, who did that sort of thing. For example, the Earl of Lisburne was promoted to being an Irish Earl because he provided trops for Henry V11 for the fight against Richard 111. The Vaughans were-and are-Welsh.

1815 – Napoleonic Wars: The Battle of Waterloo results in the defeat of Napoleon Bonaparte by the Duke of Wellington and Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher forcing him to abdicate the throne of France for the second and last time.

And thus, arguably, ended the very first world war.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 19, 2015, 05:33:47 AM
June 19, 1962
Starfish, the second planned test of Operation Fishbowl, under Operation Dominic, occurs with the launch of an SM-75 Thor IRBM missile with a nuclear warhead just before midnight from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean. The vehicle flies a normal trajectory for 59 seconds; then the rocket engine suddenly stops, and the missile begins to break apart. The range safety officer orders the destruction of the missile and the warhead. The missile was between 30,000 and 35,000 feet (between 9.1 and 10.7 km) in altitude when it was destroyed. Some of the missile parts fall on Johnston Island, and a large amount of missile debris falls into the ocean in the vicinity of the island. Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal and Underwater Demolition Team swimmers recover approximately 250 pieces of the missile assembly during the next two weeks. Some of the debris is contaminated with plutonium. Nonessential personnel had been evacuated from Johnston Island during the test. Although, by definition, this qualifies as a Broken Arrow incident, this test is rarely included in lists of such mishaps.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 20, 2015, 10:32:08 AM
1863 - West Virginia admitted as 35th US state
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 20, 2015, 03:59:27 PM
So much happened today, but I guess this event heralded a new age across the world:

1837 – Queen Victoria succeeds to the British throne.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 21, 2015, 05:43:53 AM
June 21, 1893,
The first Ferris wheel premiered at Chicago’s Columbian Exposition, America’s third world’s fair. It was invented by George Washington Ferris, a Pittsburgh bridge builder, for the purpose of creating an attraction like the Eiffel Tower in Paris. Each of the 36 cars carried 60 passengers, making a full passenger load of 150 tons. Ferris didn’t use rigid spokes: instead, he used a web of taut cables, like a bicycle wheel. Supported by two 140 foot steel towers, its 45 foot axle was the largest single piece of forged steel at the time in the world. The highest point of the wheel was 264 feet. The wheel and cars weighed 2100 tons, with another 2200 tons of associated levers and machinery.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 21, 2015, 07:56:46 AM
1939    Baseball legend Lou Gehrig is forced to quit baseball because of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis–a disease which wastes muscles.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 21, 2015, 10:53:35 AM
1997 - At the county prison, which was closed as a jail in 1995 and reopened as The Old Jail Museum, the four Molly Maguires executed on this date in 1877, were remembered in a Memorial Mass attended by 100 of their descendants and members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 22, 2015, 08:02:15 AM

1772    Slavery is outlawed in England.
1981    Mark David Chapman pleads guilty to killing John Lennon.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 22, 2015, 10:30:31 AM
1941 – Nazi Germany invades the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa. Which proved to be a bit of an error.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 22, 2015, 12:01:41 PM
1997 - Orange parades pass off quietly amid growing fears of a further stand-off at Drumcree
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on June 22, 2015, 04:21:10 PM
1941 – Nazi Germany invades the Soviet Union in Operation Barbarossa. Which proved to be a bit of an error.

Vat do you mean? Der Furher said ve vill be in Moscow before de end of summer!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 23, 2015, 05:53:53 AM
June 23, 1990,
Buddy Holly's Gibson acoustic guitar sold for $237,419 in a Sotheby's auction. The guitar was in a tooled leather case made by Holly himself.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 23, 2015, 09:38:55 AM
Today is the eve of St. John's Feastday; it is also Mid Summer's Eve - an ancient solar feast celebrated with bonfires throughout the Celtic lands.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: BMW-K on June 23, 2015, 09:52:13 AM
Today in history, 1969...

I was born.

 8)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on June 23, 2015, 10:38:38 AM
June 23rd 1912, Alan Turing born - pioneer computer scientist and cryptanalyst who shortened WW2 and was hounded to his death because of his sexuality.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: BMW-K on June 23, 2015, 10:53:31 AM
Great.  So Genius, crazy, visionary people abound on my Birthday.

Well, at least I'm in good company.   :blbl:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on June 23, 2015, 11:34:42 AM
Happy Birthday BMW-K!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 24, 2015, 09:15:21 AM
In the Liturgical Calendar, today is the feast of St. John.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on June 24, 2015, 10:27:31 AM
In the Liturgical Calendar, today is the feast of St. John.

Which one?  If it's Patmos, pass the mushrooms please! :couch:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 24, 2015, 01:11:19 PM
1812 – Napoleonic Wars: Napoleon's Grande Armée crosses the Neman river beginning the invasion of Russia. That was a bit of a mistake, as well.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on June 24, 2015, 02:05:58 PM
In the Liturgical Calendar, today is the feast of St. John.

Which one?  If it's Patmos, pass the mushrooms please! :couch:

I believe it's John the Baptist.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on June 24, 2015, 02:44:05 PM
In the Liturgical Calendar, today is the feast of St. John.

Which one?  If it's Patmos, pass the mushrooms please! :couch:

I believe it's John the Baptist.

I guess we just get water at the feast, then. :-\

I did go swimming today with Little Bit.  Does that count?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 24, 2015, 03:25:53 PM
It's actually a great cookout with a bonfire. Couldn't be more 'Murican way to ring in summer.

All over Europe, from Scandinavia to Spain, and from Ireland to Russia, Saint John's Day festivities are closely associated with the ancient nature lore of the great summer festival of pre-Christian times. Fires are lighted on mountains and hilltops on the eve of his feast. These "Saint John's fires" burn brightly and quietly along the fiords of Norway, on the peaks of the Alps, on the slopes of the Pyrenees, and on the mountains of Spain (where they are called Hogueras). They were an ancient symbol of the warmth and light of the sun which the forefathers greeted at the beginning of summer. In many places, great celebrations are held with dances, games, and outdoor meals.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 25, 2015, 06:08:35 AM
June 25, 1967,
During a north American tour The Jimi Hendrix Experience gave a free afternoon concert in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco. They then played another two shows that evening at the Fillmore West.
http://youtu.be/Om3JfoMkYbo (http://youtu.be/Om3JfoMkYbo)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 25, 2015, 07:33:38 AM
1876- General George A. Custer and over 260 men of the Seventh Cavalry are wiped out by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians at Little Big Horn in Montana.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on June 25, 2015, 09:53:26 AM
1876- General George A. Custer and over 260 men of the Seventh Cavalry are wiped out by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians at Little Big Horn in Montana.

They had it coming.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 25, 2015, 01:31:18 PM
1876- General George A. Custer and over 260 men of the Seventh Cavalry are wiped out by Sioux and Cheyenne Indians at Little Big Horn in Montana.

They had it coming.

The troopers didn't, Custer did. Twat.

1943 – The Holocaust: Jews in the Częstochowa Ghetto in Poland stage an uprising against the Nazis.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 26, 2015, 05:43:33 AM
June 26, 2008,
Total Guitar magazine voted Celine Dion’s rendition of the AC/DC track ‘You Shook Me All Night Long’ as the world's worst cover version ever, the magazines editor Stephen Lawson said Dion's cover was "sacrilege".
You have been warned!
http://youtu.be/1niTEkP-6eo (http://youtu.be/1niTEkP-6eo)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 26, 2015, 08:38:06 AM
1991 - The convictions of the Maguire Seven are quashed
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on June 26, 2015, 09:20:46 AM
1975    Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi is convicted of election fraud.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 27, 2015, 05:31:20 AM
June 27, 1985 
After 59 years, the iconic Route 66 enters the realm of history on this day in 1985, when the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials decertified the road and votes to remove all its highway signs.
Hooray for them.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on June 27, 2015, 09:55:29 AM
June 27, 1985 
After 59 years, the iconic Route 66 enters the realm of history on this day in 1985, when the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials decertified the road and votes to remove all its highway signs.
Hooray for them.

Glad I got to ride a portion of the old Route 66.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 27, 2015, 10:18:43 AM
June 27 1957:Hurricane Audrey makes landfall around Cameron LA. Packing winds of 145 MPH it does $145 million (1957 dollars). It has enough energy to travel all the way into Canada with tropical storm force winds.









How did Bush manage that?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 28, 2015, 06:05:40 AM
June 28, 1957
In two separate accidents, two newly delivered Lockheed U-2s of the SAC's 4028th Strategic Reconnaissance Squadron (SRS) based at Laughlin Air Force Base, Del Rio, Texas, are lost on the same day. At 08:55 Lt. Ford Lowcock is killed when his aircraft, U-2A 56-6699, Article 366, crashes while on the approach to Laughlin. Less than two hours later, Lt. Leo Smith is also killed when his aircraft, U-2C 56-6702, Article 369, crashes in the New Mexico desert. At this time U-2s are not equipped with ejection seats to save weight, but at around this point this policy is reversed. Three months later on 26 September, the squadron's Commanding Officer, Col. Jack Nole climbs out of his disabled U-2A, 56-6694, Article 361, the first airframe of the initial USAF order, (wing flaps deployed in flight) near Del Rio, Texas, making the highest ever parachute escape to date, from 53,000 feet.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 28, 2015, 10:42:19 AM
1922 - The Provisional Government of the Irish Free State bombards the Four Courts in Dublin, and the Civil War begins
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on June 29, 2015, 02:00:49 AM
2014 – The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant self-declared its caliphate in Syria and northern Iraq.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 29, 2015, 09:50:38 AM
1998 - Northern Ireland braces braced violent conflict after irate Orangemen vow not to recognise a Parades Commission order banning them from marching along the nationalist Garvaghy Road in Portadown
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on June 30, 2015, 10:02:03 AM
June 30, 1859       
Jean Francois Gravelet aka Emile Blondin, a French daredevil, becomes the first man to walk across Niagara Falls on a tightrope.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on June 30, 2015, 10:17:03 AM
1922 - The Four Courts, Dublin, are abandoned by Anti-Treaty forces after a two-day bombardment
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 01, 2015, 05:34:24 AM
Happy Birthday Canada!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on July 01, 2015, 05:36:20 AM
OH! Eh?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on July 01, 2015, 06:35:05 AM
Happy Birthday Canada!

That explains why there are no Canadians here today in this Canadian company here in 'Merica. Did they close the bridge/tunnel?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 01, 2015, 10:01:25 AM
Happy Birthday Canada!

That explains why there are no Canadians here today ...
We're all canoeing and drinking hi-potency beers.
Well...drinking beers...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on July 01, 2015, 10:16:00 AM
This day in 1916 the battle of the Somme began.
It lasted over 5 months and there were more than a million casualties.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Max Wedge on July 01, 2015, 10:47:32 AM
Happy Birthday Canada!

That explains why there are no Canadians here today ...
We're all canoeing and drinking hi-potency beers.
Well...drinking beers...

While eating back-bacon and wearing tucs?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on July 01, 2015, 12:07:13 PM
Born this day in 1945, Debbie Harry.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on July 01, 2015, 12:08:36 PM
Born this day in 1965, Carl Fogarty.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 01, 2015, 01:37:28 PM
Born this day: me
Princess Diana died
The first day of the battle of the Somme
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 01, 2015, 02:07:03 PM
Born this day: me
Princess Diana died
The first day of the battle of the Somme

Happy Birthday, Papa!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on July 01, 2015, 02:14:24 PM
Born this day: me
Princess Diana died
The first day of the battle of the Somme


Happy Birthday, Papa!

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(o\_!_/o)

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on July 02, 2015, 03:25:16 AM
Happy Birthday Canada!

That explains why there are no Canadians here today ...
We're all canoeing and drinking hi-potency beers.
Well...drinking beers...

While eating back-bacon and wearing tucs?

We look pretty damn good for 148!!!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 02, 2015, 05:25:12 AM
July 2, 1979,
Sony introduced the Walkman, the first portable audio cassette player. Over the next 30 years they sold over 385 million Walkmans in cassette, CD, mini-disc and digital file versions, and were the market leaders until the arrival of Apple's iPod.
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It's so tiny!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 02, 2015, 08:55:21 AM
 :(
2000 - Joey Dunlop, motorcycle racer and humanitarian worker, dies in an accident during a race in Estonia
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 02, 2015, 03:10:24 PM
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-30895961 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-30895961)

A good man died today. He kept his wartime activities secret from his wife, who only founf out what he did by finding papers in the attic in 1980

Sir Nicholas Winton rescued 669 children destined for Nazi concentration camps from Czechoslovakia as the outbreak of World War Two loomed.

His death at the age of 106 came on the same day 76 years ago when the train carrying the largest number of children - 241 - departed from Prague.

The reluctant hero worked to find British families willing to put up £50 to look after the boys and girls in their homes.

His efforts were not publicly known for almost 50 years.

More than 370 of the children he saved have never been traced and do not know the full story.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 03, 2015, 05:18:01 AM
July 3, 1903      
The first cable across the Pacific Ocean is spliced between Honolulu, Midway, Guam and Manila.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 04, 2015, 05:39:53 AM
July 4, 1969,
Janis Joplin, Led Zeppelin, Johnny Winter, Delaney and Bonnie, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Canned Heat, Joe Cocker, Blood Sweat & Tears, Chuck Berry, Spirit, Chicago and Paul Butterfield all appeared at the two-day Atlanta Pop Festival, Byron, Georgia.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 07, 2015, 05:54:35 AM
July 7, 2006,
Syd Barrett died from complications arising from diabetes aged 60. The singer, songwriter, guitarist was one of the founding members of Pink Floyd, active as a rock musician for only about seven years before he went into seclusion. He joined Pink Floyd in 1965 but left three years later after one album. Barrett released two solo albums before going into self-imposed seclusion lasting more than thirty years, with his mental deterioration blamed on drugs.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on July 07, 2015, 07:38:54 AM
7 July, 1865
The US executes a woman for the first time.  Mary Surratt was found guilty of conspiracy to assassinate President Lincoln and hung for the crime.
 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 07, 2015, 08:15:31 AM
Lest we forget.

2005 – A series of four explosions occurs on London's transport system killing 56 people including four suicide bombers and injuring over 700 others.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 07, 2015, 11:09:13 AM
1930 - Death of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, born in Scotland of Irish parents
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: olderigetfasteriam on July 07, 2015, 08:17:09 PM
http://www.historyorb.com/people/ringo-starr (http://www.historyorb.com/people/ringo-starr)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 08, 2015, 02:37:49 AM
1099 – First Crusade: Fifteen thousand starving Christian soldiers march in a religious procession around Jerusalem as its Muslim defenders look on.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 08, 2015, 04:53:39 AM
First Issue of The Wall Street Journal Is Published (1889)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 08, 2015, 05:11:47 AM
1796 - US State Department issues 1st US passport

1835 - Liberty Bell cracks (again)

1889 - John L Sullivan KOs Jake Kilrain in 75 rounds (last bare-knuckle bout)

1891 - 61°F, highest temp for July 1891, in Baltimore & Phila
proof global warming is real
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 08, 2015, 05:17:27 AM
July 8, 1967,
The Monkees began a 29-date tour with The Jimi Hendrix Experience as support act.
Hendrix was dropped after six shows after being told his act was not suitable for their teenybopper audience.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 10, 2015, 05:01:23 AM
1553 – Lady Jane Grey takes the throne of England. Which didn't go well for her, poor innocent.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 10, 2015, 05:19:32 AM
July 10, 2008,
The drum skin used on the cover of The Beatles' Sgt Pepper album sold for $1million at Christie's Memorabilia auction in London. Other items sold included John Lennon's lyrics for 'Give Peace a Chance' which sold for $832,257 and a pair of tinted prescription sunglasses belonging to Lennon, which he wore for the cover of the single 'Mind Games', sold for $79,000. A rare 1/4 inch reel to-reel master tape recording of the Jimi Hendrix Experience performing at the Woburn Music Festival in 1968 went for $95,000, a Marshall amplifier used by Hendrix in concert fetched $50,000.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on July 10, 2015, 10:07:07 AM
1989 - Mel Blanc, the "man of a thousand voices," died at age 81. He was known for such cartoon characters as Daffy Duck, Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on July 10, 2015, 11:10:24 AM
This day in 1940 the Battle of Britain began in the skies above the UK.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 10, 2015, 12:23:48 PM
1921 - Unionists burn 160 homes in Belfast, killing 15 and injuring 58.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on July 10, 2015, 09:44:09 PM
1989 - Mel Blanc, the "man of a thousand voices," died at age 81. He was known for such cartoon characters as Daffy Duck, Bugs Bunny and Porky Pig.

Mel Blanc was the man.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=O9s8U0O0XPE
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 11, 2015, 02:27:09 AM
1405 – Ming admiral Zheng He sets sail to explore the world for the first time.  This voyage may have led to the Chinese discovery of the Americas.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 11, 2015, 05:53:25 AM
1405 – Ming admiral Zheng He sets sail to explore the world for the first time.  This voyage may have led to the Chinese discovery of the Americas.
The "Africans" were already here.
 :shrug:

July 11, 1996
A General Dynamics F-16C Block 50C Fighting Falcon, 91-0354, of the 77th Fighter Squadron, being relocated from Shaw AFB, South Carolina, to Eglin AFB, Florida, to avoid Hurricane Bertha, crashes at ~1530 hrs. into a neighborhood 20 miles N of Pensacola, Florida, following an engine failure, striking two homes and killing a four-year old boy. A man and woman in the house suffered burns. The pilot was forced to eject two miles short of the runway. The pilot was uninjured. The accident investigation showed foreign object damage to a fan blade caused a crack seven thousands of an inch (too small to visually spot). The blade was ingested into the engine. The engine had failed three times during the flight with two relights. With the third engine failure the pilot ditched the aircraft into what he hoped was an unpopulated area, and ejected at only 200 feet.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on July 11, 2015, 07:51:44 AM
1975    Archaeologists unearth an army of 8,000 life-size clay figures created more than 2,000 years ago for the Emperor Qin Shi Huangdi.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 11, 2015, 12:25:32 PM
1999 - A massive security operation swings into action as tens of thousands of Orangemen prepare to parade into Ormeau Park in the flashpoint south Belfast area on the banks of the River Lagan
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 12, 2015, 05:42:34 AM
July 12, 2008,
Rolling Stone Ron Wood left his wife of 23 years and moved in with an 18-year-old Russian cocktail waitress. The 61 year-old dad-of-four had met the teenager while out drinking and had taken her away to his luxury pad in Ireland.
 :beerchug: :naughty: :twofinger:
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 12, 2015, 07:14:27 AM
And on a similar note: 1962 – The Rolling Stones perform their first concert, at the Marquee Club in London, England, United Kingdom.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on July 12, 2015, 07:37:58 AM
1954    President Dwight D. Eisenhower proposes a highway modernization program, with costs to be shared by federal and state governments.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 12, 2015, 11:05:48 AM
1690 - Battle of the Boyne and victory for William of Orange
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 13, 2015, 06:09:07 AM
July 13, 1977,
A power failure blacked out New York. Starting at about 9 pm, four lightning strikes on high-voltage transmission lines within the course of about half-an-hour knocked out electricity and plunged millions of residents of New York City into darkness. Unlike the calm during a similar blackout in 1965, the 1977 blackout erupted in chaos. The city was already in the midst of a financial crisis and high unemployment. Responding to the tension of the times, mobs set fires, smashed windows and hauled away food, clothing and appliances. It took 25 hours to restore power to the entire city. About 4,500 people were arrested during the riots, which resulted in damage estimated at $61 million.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on July 13, 2015, 06:30:38 AM
1943 - Greatest tank battle in history ends with Russia's defeat of Germany at Kursk, almost 6,000 tanks take part, 2,900 were lost by Germany
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 13, 2015, 08:26:52 AM
1998 - The second stage of the Tour de France (taking place for the first time in Ireland) ends in Cork City. A crowd of between 40,000 and 50,000 turn out to see the history-making event.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 13, 2015, 09:38:06 AM
Hollywood Sign Is Dedicated (1923)

The iconic Hollywood sign overlooking the community and spelling out its name in 50-foot (15-meter) high white letters originally said "Hollywoodland" and was erected as an advertisement for a real estate firm promoting a new housing development with that name. Though not intended to be permanent, the sign quickly became an internationally recognized landmark, and the last four letters were removed in 1949. What are some of the ways that pranksters have altered the sign over the years?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 14, 2015, 06:56:57 AM
July 14, 1982,
Van Halen kicked off their 105-date North American 'Hide Your Sheep Tour' at Richmond County Civic Center in Augusta, Georgia.
Sheep lie, BTW...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on July 14, 2015, 07:22:13 AM
July 14, 1982,
Van Halen kicked off their 105-date North American 'Hide Your Sheep Tour' at Richmond County Civic Center in Augusta, Georgia.
Sheep lie, BTW...

Wicked liars they be. Wicked liars.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 14, 2015, 09:51:47 AM
1999 - Ulster Unionists reject peace blueprint
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on July 14, 2015, 04:46:21 PM
This day, 2015.  America seals the deal by exploring every planet first.   :bigok:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 15, 2015, 05:16:54 AM
July 15, 1869,
Margarine was patented by Hippolyte Mège Mouriés in France (No. 86489). He won the contest held by Emperor Napoleon III to find a substitute for butter used by the French Navy. His formula included a fatty component that mixed to a pearly luster, so he named his product after the Greek word for pearl - margaritari. His margarine was manufactured from tallow. Although the prize winner, it was not until F. Boudet patented a process for emulsifying it with skimmed milk and water (1872) that magarine was made sufficiently palatable to be a commercial success. The U.S. dairy industry opposed the introduction of margarine in the U.S. For years, they pressed Congress for many legislative restrictions on its production.
Pass the butter, please...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on July 15, 2015, 05:30:06 AM
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on July 15, 2015, 09:44:51 AM
1954    President Dwight D. Eisenhower proposes a highway modernization program, with costs to be shared by federal and state governments.

The original network was authorized by Congress in 1956 and completed in 1991 with extensions and "connectors" to other transportation modes since then.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 17, 2015, 08:57:34 AM
1846 - Birth of Fenian, John McLure. He is one of 30 Fenian prisoners released in a general amnesty by the British government on January 5, 1871. They are released on condition that they exile themselves to the country of their choice and not return until their sentences have expired. Many choose to go to Australia, but John McClure, Jeremiah O'Donovan Rossa, John Devoy, Henry Mulleda and Charles Underwood O'Connell, who had all been imprisoned together, decide to go to America and ship out from Liverpool on board the "Cuba." The so-called 'Cuba Five' arrive in New York to a hero's welcome and even receive a resolution of welcome from the US House of Representatives
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 17, 2015, 09:09:38 AM
July 17, 1959,
Billie Holiday died in a New York City hospital from cirrhosis of the liver after years of alcohol abuse, aged 43. (While under arrest for heroin possession, with Police officers stationed at the door to her room.) In the final years of her life, she had been progressively swindled out of her earnings, and she died with $0.70 in the bank.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on July 17, 2015, 09:37:18 AM
1960  American pilot Francis Gary Powers pleads guilty to spying charges in a Moscow court.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 17, 2015, 01:57:47 PM
July 17, 1959,
Billie Holiday died in a New York City hospital from cirrhosis of the liver after years of alcohol abuse, aged 43. (While under arrest for heroin possession, with Police officers stationed at the door to her room.) In the final years of her life, she had been progressively swindled out of her earnings, and she died with $0.70 in the bank.
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I love her music, so much.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 17, 2015, 01:58:15 PM
1960  American pilot Francis Gary Powers pleads guilty to spying charges in a Moscow court.

Well, he was guillty.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on July 17, 2015, 02:37:48 PM
1908  Alfred P. Loveland, world-renowned ornithologist and founder of the town of Loveland Colorado, succumbs to distemper after having been pecked by a rabid finch.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jim on July 17, 2015, 04:31:15 PM
1908  Alfred P. Loveland, world-renowned ornithologist and founder of the town of Loveland Colorado, succumbs to distemper after having been pecked by a rabid finch.

Interesting, thx.

Loveland is a sister city to FoCo.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 19, 2015, 11:39:20 AM
1999 - Amnesty International honors its longest serving member in Ireland, Iris Bardon, with a presentation on her 100th birthday.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on July 19, 2015, 12:50:08 PM
1908  Alfred P. Loveland, world-renowned ornithologist and founder of the town of Loveland Colorado, succumbs to distemper after having been pecked by a rabid finch.

False. Loveland Colorado was named for William A.H. Loveland, who was not an ornithologist, but a railroad entrepreneur and did not get pecked by a "rabid Finch". Which would not give you distemper anyhow.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loveland,_Colorado

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_A.H._Loveland
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 19, 2015, 01:06:22 PM
That's a shame. I preferred the original story.

1545 – The Tudor warship Mary Rose sinks off Portsmouth; in 1982 the wreck is salvaged in one of the most complex and expensive projects in the history of maritime archaeology.

Well worth a visit if you're in England. The wreck is stunning.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 19, 2015, 01:19:59 PM
1553 – Lady Jane Grey is replaced by Mary I of England as Queen of England after only nine days on the throne.

The she had her head chopped off. Poor little innocent.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on July 19, 2015, 05:04:19 PM
Bloody Mary. I love them. Too bad about the Protestants though.

It's a comin' (http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/07/20/the-really-big-one)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 19, 2015, 05:53:45 PM
Today is national ice cream day.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on July 19, 2015, 06:29:16 PM
1908  Alfred P. Loveland, world-renowned ornithologist and founder of the town of Loveland Colorado, succumbs to distemper after having been pecked by a rabid finch.

False. Loveland Colorado was named for William A.H. Loveland, who was not an ornithologist, but a railroad entrepreneur and did not get pecked by a "rabid Finch". Which would not give you distemper anyhow.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loveland,_Colorado

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_A.H._Loveland

 :blbl:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 19, 2015, 09:28:23 PM
Samuel Colt (1814) birthday

Colt patented his revolving-breech pistol in 1836, but the six-shooter was slow to gain acceptance, and his company failed in 1842. However, a US government order for 1,000 pistols during the Mexican War allowed Colt to resume its manufacture in 1847. Colt advanced the development of interchangeable parts and the assembly line, and his revolvers, including the famous Colt .45, became so popular that the word "Colt" was sometimes used as a generic term for any revolver. What else did Colt invent?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 20, 2015, 12:39:53 AM
1807 – Nicéphore Niépce is awarded a patent by Napoleon for the Pyréolophore, the world's first internal combustion engine, after it successfully powered a boat upstream on the river Saône in France.



The Pyréolophore (pronounced pea-ray-oh-loh-for; from Ancient Greek πῦρ, pyr, meaning "fire", Αἴολος, Αiolos, meaning "wind", and -φόρος -phoros, meaning "bearer") was probably the world's first internal combustion engine. It was invented in the early 19th century in Chalon-sur-Saône, France, by the Niépce brothers: Nicéphore Niépce (who went on to invent photography) and his brother Claude.[1]

In 1807 the brothers ran a prototype internal combustion engine, and on 20 July 1807 a patent was granted by Napoleon Bonaparte after it had successfully powered a boat upstream on the river Saône.

The Pyréolophore ran on what were believed to be "controlled dust explosions" of various experimental fuels, although technically they were deflagrations (rapid burns). The fuels included mixtures of Lycopodium powder (the spores of Lycopodium, or clubmoss), finely crushed coal dust, and resin.[1]

Operating independently, the Swiss engineer François Isaac de Rivaz built the De Rivaz engine, a hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine in 1807. These practical engineering projects may have followed the 1680 theoretical design of an internal combustion engine by the Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens.[1][2] The separate, virtually contemporaneous implementations of this design in different modes of transport means that the de Rivaz engine may be correctly described as the first use of an internal combustion engine in an automobile (1808), whilst the Pyréolophore was the first use of an internal combustion engine in a boat (1807).



Now, I never knew that.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 20, 2015, 05:16:02 AM
What else did Colt invent?


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July 20, 1904
El Paso Brewery opened.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on July 20, 2015, 05:41:29 AM
1969  Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin become the first men to walk on the moon.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on July 20, 2015, 11:13:38 PM
1969  Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin become the first men to walk on the moon.

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 :clap: :hail:

To quote Jim Lovell..."When will we go back?"

Let us not forget another milestone in the field of human exploration....

Sir Edmund Hillary was born on July 20, 1919 in Auckland, New Zealand.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 21, 2015, 05:28:47 AM
And another legend's birthday is today.

Don Knotts (1924)

Knotts was an American comedic actor best known for his portrayal of the bumbling but earnest sheriff's deputy Barney Fife on the 1960s sitcom The Andy Griffith Show. When the show first aired, Griffith—as Sheriff Andy Taylor—was to be the comedic lead, and Knotts was to play his straight man, but Knotts's Fife proved so funny that this was soon reversed. The role earned Knotts 5 Emmy Awards for Best Supporting Actor in a Television Comedy. In what film did he first appear with Griffith?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 21, 2015, 05:32:37 AM
This must be a national holiday for Papa.


Swan Upping

The tradition of marking newborn swans goes back six centuries, when most of the swans on England's public waters were owned by the Queen. Every year since 1363, the Queen's swan master and the swan wardens of the two livery companies row up the Thames, starting at Blackfriars and continuing upstream to Abingdon, and "up" all the swan families into the boats, where they are marked with identification numbers. There are very specific rules governing how ownership is decided, and the six boats, each flying a large silk flag, form a procession that has changed little over the centuries.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 21, 2015, 05:36:12 AM
July 21 1873       
The James Gang robs a train in Adair, Iowa.
Hellofa band, though...
http://youtu.be/kLy63Pq1rUw?list=PLR78P_d7JWFKCMkv7C3lKt3T9ZrjoEljK (http://youtu.be/kLy63Pq1rUw?list=PLR78P_d7JWFKCMkv7C3lKt3T9ZrjoEljK)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 21, 2015, 10:56:18 AM
Louis Rigolly, a Frenchman, was the first man to drive a car at over 100 miles per hour (160 km/h)

He set a record of 103.561 mph (166.665 km/h) on a beach at Ostend in Belgium on 21 July 1904, driving a 13.5 litre Gobron-Brillié racing car. He covered a 1 kilometre course in 21.6 seconds, beating Belgian Pierre de Caters mark of 97.25 mph (156.51 km/h), set the previous May over the same 1 kilometre course in Ostend. The record stood for just three months. Rigolly also participated in early Grand Prix motor racing.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 21, 2015, 01:34:14 PM
Born today in 1951. Robin Williams. You're missed ya fucking maniac.  :-[
Title: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on July 21, 2015, 05:31:18 PM
Today in history Little Bit flailed, hit my phone and generated this reply. I have obviously edited it. [emoji56]

Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 22, 2015, 05:14:55 AM
July 22, 1967,
Quicksilver Messenger Service and Big Brother & the Holding Co. appeared at the Convention Hall, San Diego, California.
http://youtu.be/bqVVnExlX9c (http://youtu.be/bqVVnExlX9c)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on July 22, 2015, 07:19:49 AM
1938  The Third Reich issues special identity cards for Jewish Germans.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 22, 2015, 01:38:47 PM
Wiley Post Becomes First Pilot to Circumnavigate the Globe Solo (1933)

In 1931, American aviator Wiley Post flew around the world with navigator Harold Gatty in 8 days, 15 hours, and 51 minutes, breaking the previous record of 21 days. They published an account of their trip in Around the World in Eight Days. Two years later, Post became the first person to fly around the world alone, a feat he completed in just 7 days and 19 hours. Post died in 1935 when his plane crashed in Alaska with what famous entertainer on board?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 22, 2015, 01:45:18 PM
Golden Days


Golden Days is a celebration in Fairbanks, Alaska, of the discovery of gold there on July 22, 1902, and the Gold Rush days that followed. This is the largest summertime event in Alaska. The week of activities includes "Fairbanks in Bloom," billed as the farthest-north flower show, a rubber ducky race, beard and hairy-leg contests, drag races, a golf tournament, concerts, and a grand parade. There's also a Felix Pedro look-alike contest. Felix Pedrone (remembered as Felix Pedro) was the Italian immigrant who first found gold on a creek near what is now Fairbanks.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 22, 2015, 01:54:06 PM
1706 – The Acts of Union 1707 are agreed upon by commissioners from the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland, which, when passed by each countries' Parliaments, led to the creation of the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Why did Scotland do this? It was broke after investing in some ill-advised American stuff.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on July 22, 2015, 07:07:31 PM
1706 – The Acts of Union 1707 are agreed upon by commissioners from the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland, which, when passed by each countries' Parliaments, led to the creation of the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Why did Scotland do this? It was broke after investing in some ill-advised American stuff.

Interesting.  That came back to bite them in the ass, didn't it?   :bigsmile:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on July 22, 2015, 07:11:35 PM
Post died in 1935 when his plane crashed in Alaska with what famous entertainer on board?

Francis the Talking Mule.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 23, 2015, 05:56:54 AM
July 23, 1983
Air Canada Flight 143, a Boeing 767, runs out of fuel above Manitoba because of a miscalculation; the crew successfully glides the aircraft to a safe landing at a former Air Force base (and current drag strip) at Gimli, Manitoba; the aircraft becomes known as the "Gimli Glider".
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 25, 2015, 06:01:04 AM
July 25, 1962
The third launch attempt of a nuclear warhead in Operation Fishbowl, as part of Operation Dominic, aboard a Douglas SM-75 Thor IRBM, 58-2291, vehicle number 180, from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, named Bluegill Prime, after the 2 June 1962 failure of the first attempt, Bluegill, also fails when, due to a sticking valve, the Thor missile malfunctions after ignition of the rocket engine, but before leaving the launch pad. The range safety officer destroys the nuclear warhead by radio command with the missile still on the launch pad. The vehicle then explodes, causing extensive damage in the area of the launch pad. Although there was no danger of an accidental nuclear explosion, the destruction of the nuclear warhead on the pad causes extensive contamination of the area by alpha-emitting radioactive materials. Burning rocket fuel, flowing through the cable trenches, causes extensive chemical contamination of the trenches and the equipment associated with the cabling in the trenches. The radiation contamination on Johnston Island is determined to be a major problem, and it is necessary to decontaminate the entire area before the badly damaged launch pad can be rebuilt. Further launch operations will not resume until 15 October 1962. Although, by definition, this qualifies as a Broken Arrow incident, this test is rarely included in lists of such mishaps.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 25, 2015, 06:25:21 AM
306 – Constantine I is proclaimed Roman emperor by his troops.

315 – The Arch of Constantine is completed near the Colosseum in Rome to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Milvian Bridge.

And so begins the rise of Christianity.

Oh, and Maxentius (Macsen Wledig in Welsh) is meant to be ancestor of mine. But that's probably untrue-all the Welsh petty kings were claiming descendence from him, as he married Helen (Elen in Welsh), who was a Celtic Princess. But I called my youngest after him anyway.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on July 25, 2015, 07:13:20 AM
1567   Mary, Queen of Scots, is imprisoned and forced to abdicate her throne to her 1-year-old son James VI.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 25, 2015, 08:28:06 AM
1567   Mary, Queen of Scots, is imprisoned and forced to abdicate her throne to her 1-year-old son James VI.

That kid was a go getter.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 25, 2015, 09:51:02 AM
Today is the feast day of St. James. Since medieval times, Dubliners held an annual drinking festival in the Saint’s honour. Fittingly, Guinness chose St. James’ Gate as the site for their brewery
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 25, 2015, 04:11:36 PM
Fittingly, Guinness chose St. James’ Gate as the site for their brewery
:hail: :beerchug:  :hail: :beerchug:  :hail: :beerchug:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 26, 2015, 06:20:14 AM
July 26, 1814       
British and American forces fight each other to a standoff at Lundy’s Lane, Niagara Falls, Canada.
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The Americans abandoned their attempt at annexation, only to return as rich vacationers.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 26, 2015, 10:42:11 AM
1998 - Robert Saulters, the Grand Master of the Orange Order, puts his leadership on the line with a call for talks with nationalist residents
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 26, 2015, 05:07:47 PM
World Champion Bathtub Race
In 1967, the British Columbian city of Nanaimo decided to mark its centennial anniversary with a race in its Nanaimo Harbor. Thus was born the International World Championship Bathtub Race, the main event of the four-day Nanaimo Marine Festival. The 36-mile race features homemade entries that have the shape and design of a tub and run on a boat motor that does not exceed eight horsepower. Other festival events include a Sail Past on Wheels Fun Parade, a "Kiddies Karnival," and a fireworks show
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 27, 2015, 06:07:20 AM
July 27, 1866,
Cyrus W. Field finally succeeded, after three failures, in laying the first underwater telegraph cable 1,686 miles long across the Atlantic Ocean between North America and Europe. Massachusetts merchant and financier Cyrus W. Field first proposed laying a 2,000-mile copper cable along the ocean bottom from Newfoundland to Ireland in 1854, but the first three attempts ended in broken cables and failure. Field's persistence finally paid off in July 1866, when the Great Eastern, the largest ship then afloat, successfully laid the cable along the level, sandy bottom of the North Atlantic.
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Immense coils of cable, thousands of miles long, were carried in tanks inside the ship. The crew had to be careful to uncoil the cable smoothly, as kinks could lead to breakage.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 27, 2015, 12:35:52 PM
July 27, 1866,
Cyrus W. Field finally succeeded, after three failures, in laying the first underwater telegraph cable 1,686 miles long across the Atlantic Ocean between North America and Europe. Massachusetts merchant and financier Cyrus W. Field first proposed laying a 2,000-mile copper cable along the ocean bottom from Newfoundland to Ireland in 1854, but the first three attempts ended in broken cables and failure. Field's persistence finally paid off in July 1866, when the Great Eastern, the largest ship then afloat, successfully laid the cable along the level, sandy bottom of the North Atlantic.
visitors can't see pics , please register or login

Immense coils of cable, thousands of miles long, were carried in tanks inside the ship. The crew had to be careful to uncoil the cable smoothly, as kinks could lead to breakage.


I visited the Cornish end of that a couple of weeks ago.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 27, 2015, 08:26:38 PM
Bugs Bunny turns 75 today.



<iframe frameborder="0" width="480" height="270" src="//www.dailymotion.com/embed/video/x4053d" allowfullscreen></iframe>
<a href="http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x4053d_merrie-melodies-a-wild-hare-1940_shortfilms" target="_blank">Merrie Melodies - A Wild Hare (1940)[/url] by <a href="http://www.dailymotion.com/Cartoonzof2006" target="_blank">Cartoonzof2006[/url]
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 28, 2015, 05:58:53 AM
July 28, 1969,
Police in Moscow reported that thousands of public phone booths had been vandalised after thieves were stealing parts of the phones to convert their acoustic guitars to electric. A feature in a Russian youth magazine had shown details on how to do this.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on July 28, 2015, 06:36:17 AM
July 28, 1969,
Police in Moscow reported that thousands of public phone booths had been vandalised after thieves were stealing parts of the phones to convert their acoustic guitars to electric. A feature in a Russian youth magazine had shown details on how to do this.

LOL...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on July 28, 2015, 07:19:13 AM
US Bomber Crashes into New York's Empire State Building (1945)

On a foggy Saturday morning in July 1945, a B-25 Mitchell bomber accidentally crashed into the north side of the Empire State Building between the 79th and 80th floors. One of the plane's engines shot through the building and out the other side, and the other plummeted down an elevator shaft. Though 14 people died in the incident, the building was largely open for business on the following Monday. What Guinness World Record was set by elevator operator Betty Lou Oliver during the accident?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 28, 2015, 07:58:11 AM
2005 - IRA issues statement ending its armed campaign. Gerry Adams says that it offered an unprecedented opportunity to revive the peace process. He called on unionists to fully embrace the principles of the Good Friday Agreement. The 36-year campaign of armed conflict has cost 3,500 lives, 1,800 of them at the hands of the Provisionals.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on July 28, 2015, 09:48:10 AM
What Guinness World Record was set by elevator operator Betty Lou Oliver during the accident?

Running?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on July 28, 2015, 09:50:11 AM
28th July 1750, Johann Sebastian Bach died.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on July 28, 2015, 10:58:07 AM
What Guinness World Record was set by elevator operator Betty Lou Oliver during the accident?
The longest (79 floors worth) iteration of: "Oh Fuuuu...."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: olderigetfasteriam on July 28, 2015, 09:06:04 PM

Elevator operator Betty Lou Oliver survived a plunge of 75 stories inside an elevator, which still stands as the Guinness World Record for the longest survived elevator fall recorded.

Wow!

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on July 28, 2015, 10:01:35 PM

Elevator operator Betty Lou Oliver survived a plunge of 75 stories inside an elevator, which still stands as the Guinness World Record for the longest survived elevator fall recorded.

Wow!

The secret is to jump up and down.  8)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 29, 2015, 06:01:21 AM
July 29, 1963,
With the US charts full of Hot Rod songs, Capitol Records sent disc jockeys a list of car terms and phrases to help promote The Beach Boys latest release ‘Little Deuce Coupe’.
http://youtu.be/e6DrMkLNYKw (http://youtu.be/e6DrMkLNYKw)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on July 29, 2015, 06:26:53 AM
1914   Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, beginning World War I.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 29, 2015, 01:24:55 PM

Elevator operator Betty Lou Oliver survived a plunge of 75 stories inside an elevator, which still stands as the Guinness World Record for the longest survived elevator fall recorded.

Wow!

The secret is to jump up and down.  8)

No, it is to press the up button three times.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on July 29, 2015, 03:00:13 PM

Elevator operator Betty Lou Oliver survived a plunge of 75 stories inside an elevator, which still stands as the Guinness World Record for the longest survived elevator fall recorded.

Wow!

The secret is to jump up and down.  8)

No, it is to press the up button three times.

I just read up on that a bit.   I'd had in mind she was bravely transporting survivors to safety in her elevator. Turns out she'd actually been injured when the plane hit; the responding medical workers treated her, laid her on a stretcher and put her in the elevator, which then plummeted 79 stories straight down.  A real FML moment...

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on July 29, 2015, 08:26:58 PM
up down up down left right left
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on July 29, 2015, 10:05:13 PM
up down up down left right left

I think that got you extra lives in "Contra".
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 30, 2015, 05:54:49 AM
July 30,1966,
The Troggs started a two week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Wild Thing'. Because of a distribution dispute, The Troggs' single was available on two competing labels: Atco and Fontana. Because both pressings were taken from the identical master recording, Billboard combined the sales for both releases, making it the only single to simultaneously reach No. 1 for two companies.
http://youtu.be/Hce74cEAAaE (http://youtu.be/Hce74cEAAaE)
Yes, it was a different time...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 30, 2015, 09:03:43 AM
1947 - The Soviet Union blocks Ireland’s application for entry into the UN on the grounds that Ireland, being neutral, had not helped to set up the organisation. However there are strong suspicions that the Soviet Union’s real objections are because Ireland is a Catholic country and would therefore always vote against the communist bloc countries
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 30, 2015, 03:42:41 PM
1947 - The Soviet Union blocks Ireland’s application for entry into the UN on the grounds that Ireland, being neutral, had not helped to set up the organisation. However there are strong suspicions that the Soviet Union’s real objections are because Ireland is a Catholic country and would therefore always vote against the communist bloc countries

Nevah!

Or-it was because the De Valera government sympathised with the Nazis...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 30, 2015, 03:43:24 PM
July 30,1966,
The Troggs started a two week run at No.1 on the US singles chart with 'Wild Thing'. Because of a distribution dispute, The Troggs' single was available on two competing labels: Atco and Fontana. Because both pressings were taken from the identical master recording, Billboard combined the sales for both releases, making it the only single to simultaneously reach No. 1 for two companies.
[url]http://youtu.be/Hce74cEAAaE[/url] ([url]http://youtu.be/Hce74cEAAaE[/url])
Yes, it was a different time...


I still have that 45. On the Fontana label.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on July 31, 2015, 05:28:08 AM
July 31, 1910,
Marconi telegraph signals were used in a murder case for the first time. American-born Dr Hawley Crippen and his mistress, Ethel Le Neve, disguised as a boy, were arrested for the murder of his wife in England. Her remains were discovered 13 Jul 1910. She had been poisoned with hyoscine, an extract of the deadly plant henbane. An arrest warrant was issued 16 Jul 1910. Crippen was spotted mid-Atlantic as they sailed from Antwerp to Canada on the SS Montrose, the first ship to be equipped with radio-telegraph, and police in London were alerted by its skipper, Captain Kendall.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: thatguy on July 31, 2015, 09:23:03 AM
 2007 - After 38 years, the occupation of Northern Ireland by the British Army ends at midnight. Operation Banner is the Army's longest continuous campaign in its history with more than 300,000 personnel serving and 763 directly killed by paramilitaries.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on July 31, 2015, 02:38:44 PM
2007 - After 38 years, the occupation of Northern Ireland by the British Army ends at midnight. Operation Banner is the Army's longest continuous campaign in its history with more than 300,000 personnel serving and 763 directly killed by paramilitaries.

I used to demonstrate against that occupation. When it started, it was to protect the Catholics from protestant violence, but the Army turned against the Catholics.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on July 31, 2015, 05:28:09 PM
On this day, in 1975, Jimmy Hoffa was...disappeared.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 01, 2015, 06:43:38 AM
1966   Charles Whitman, shooting from the Texas Tower at the University of Texas, kills 16 people and wounds 31 before being killed himself.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on August 01, 2015, 12:05:45 PM
Without the use of a high capacity weapon?

Sent from my XT1058 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: squeezer on August 01, 2015, 12:50:05 PM
Without the use of a high capacity weapon?

Sent from my XT1058 using Tapatalk

He had:
12 gauge shotgun
Remington 700 with 4x Leupold Scope
6 millimeter Remington rifle
M1 Carbine
.357 Magnum
Galesi-Brescia pistol
Luger pistol

He was a sniper, not a sprayer. His dad said he, "...could plug a squirrel in the eye before he was sixteen."

Awful but fascinating case because it's one of those lone wolf shootings where we actually know what went wrong. He had a walnut sized brain tumor affecting the hypothalamus and amygdala -- areas of the brain associated with impulse and emotional control, anger, and attack (among other things). He left behind extensive notes and journals describing his decline (injures to the hypothalamus can cause compulsive writing) and attempts to seek help (he tried to get psych help through U. of Texas and had one session, he also tried to get the police to arrest him before the murders but he hadn't broken any laws yet so they blew him off). He knew something was wrong.

His suicide note is chilling. He said he'd decided to kill his mother and wife but didn't know why (he stabbed them both to death before heading to the tower). He asked that his life insurance money, if any was left after paying debts, be used for mental health research to figure out what was wrong with him so that another tragedy could be prevented.

We actually learned a lot about how the brain works from his case.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 01, 2015, 03:43:38 PM
August 1, 2015
Swiss National Day.
Happy Fiasta naziunala Svizra DD!!
 :banana: :banana: :banana:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 01, 2015, 03:51:29 PM
1834 – Slavery is abolished in the British Empire as the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 comes into force.

About bleeding time, too. Far too late, IMHO. We'd been taking out American slave ships for years.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 03, 2015, 05:34:53 AM
Columbus Sets Sail for the New World (1492)

By his early 30s, Columbus had become a master mariner in the Portuguese merchant service. Convinced that he could reach land by sailing west, he requested ships to attempt such a voyage from both John II of Portugal and Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain but was repeatedly rebuffed. Finally, after eight years of supplication by Columbus, the Spanish monarchs decided to risk the enterprise. He sailed from Spain with three small ships and, after sailing for more than two months, reached what island?


I wonder if Columbus ever found the New World?  Was it jus like the science fiction writers described?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on August 03, 2015, 10:30:30 AM
He sailed from Spain with three small ships and, after sailing for more than two months, reached what island?


Monster Island!

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 03, 2015, 10:49:21 AM
August 3, 1968,
The two day Newport Pop Festival took place in Costa Mesa, California with Buddy Guy, Junior Wells, Alice Cooper, Canned Heat, Chambers Brothers, Charles Lloyd Quartet, Country Joe and the Fish, Electric Flag, James Cotton Blues Band, Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Sonny & Cher, Steppenwolf and Tiny Tim. Over 100,000 fans attended the festival.
http://youtu.be/kNBQgIOO2kE (http://youtu.be/kNBQgIOO2kE)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on August 03, 2015, 10:50:27 AM
He sailed from Spain with three small ships and, after sailing for more than two months, reached what island?


Monster Island!

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 04, 2015, 05:42:49 AM
August 4, 1945
Chinese troops under American General Joseph Stilwell take the town of Myitkyina from the Japanese.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 04, 2015, 02:42:01 PM
1693 – Date traditionally ascribed to Dom Perignon's invention of champagne, although he actually did not have anything to do with sparkling wine.

Curiously, Champagne-or the earliest version, was invented b y the English. Wine growing in Southern England was common then (it's on its way now, again), and it was discovered that white wine could continue to ferment in the bottle, producing a fizzy wine. It became very popular at the English court, where it was probably drunk warm, and the French nicked the idea.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 04, 2015, 02:43:21 PM
And so began the Jewish diaspora:

70 – The destruction of the Second Temple in Jerusalem by the Romans.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 04, 2015, 02:44:05 PM
And so began the end of Imperial Europe:

1914 – World War I: Germany invades Belgium. In response, Belgium and the United Kingdom declare war on Germany. The United States declares its neutrality.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 04, 2015, 05:03:12 PM
The United States declares its neutrality.
As it has been since.

Sorry, that was supposed to go in the "Sarcasm" thread...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 05, 2015, 06:36:14 AM
1962   Actress Marilyn Monroe dies under mysterious circumstances.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 06, 2015, 07:37:02 AM
The First Execution by Electric Chair (1890)

In the 1880s, inventor Thomas Edison sought to promote direct current (DC) power distribution by convincing the public that the alternating current (AC) electricity backed by rival George Westinghouse was dangerous. To that end, his partners developed an AC-powered electric chair, which was adopted by the state of New York as an official execution device. In 1889, murderer William Kemmler was sentenced to be the first person to be executed via electric chair. What happened during the execution?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 06, 2015, 01:13:53 PM
Lest we forget:

1945 – World War II: Hiroshima, Japan is devastated when the atomic bomb "Little Boy" is dropped by the United States B-29 Enola Gay. Around 70,000 people are killed instantly, and some tens of thousands die in subsequent years from burns and radiation poisoning.

The total death toll in the few months after was around 140,000.

We must never do this again.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on August 06, 2015, 01:40:32 PM
Well, once more was deemed necessary.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on August 06, 2015, 01:44:33 PM
Andy Warhol is born in 1928.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 07, 2015, 05:22:38 AM
August 7, 1970,
The Goose Lake International Music Festival was held in Leoni, Michigan. Over 200,000 fans attended the three day festival. Acts who appeared included, Jethro Tull, 10 Years After, Mountain, Chicago, Bob Seger, John Sebastian, James Gang, Stooges with Iggy Pop, Brownsville Station, MC5, Rod Stewart and Flying Burrito Brothers.
http://youtu.be/1WoiuP5yvUM (http://youtu.be/1WoiuP5yvUM)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 07, 2015, 05:55:55 AM
One for the Jarheads

Battle of Guadalcanal Begins (1942)

During World War II, the Japanese occupied the island of Guadalcanal in the South Pacific. Hoping to prevent the Japanese from using this position to threaten supply routes between the US, Australia, and New Zealand, the Allies launched their first large-scale invasion of a Japanese-held island. After six months of bitter fighting on the ground, at sea, and in the air, the Allies captured the island. Why is the victory considered a strategically significant turning point in the war?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 07, 2015, 06:31:02 AM
1971  Apollo 15 returns to Earth. The mission to the moon had marked the first use of the Lunar Roving Vehicle.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 08, 2015, 05:08:54 AM
Hobo Convention

The small, rural town of Britt, Iowa, seems an unlikely location for a convention of hobos—the unwashed but colorful riders of America's empty boxcars—but for a week each summer its residents play host to this diminishing segment of the population. There is a parade, an arts fair, carnival rides, races, and music. But the real action centers on the hobo camp set up by festival organizers on the outskirts of town, where visitors can hear the life stories of these men who have chosen to travel the country unencumbered by family or property.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 08, 2015, 05:09:19 AM
Collapse of Warsaw Radio Mast (1991)

Upon its completion in 1974, the Warsaw radio mast in Poland became the world's tallest structure. Standing 2,120 feet (646 m) tall, the tower was used for long-wave radio broadcasting. In 1991, the mast underwent repairs to exchange guy wires, the cables used to stabilize the tower. However, the mast bent and then snapped at approximately half its height. It was never rebuilt. What became the world's tallest structure upon the Warsaw radio mast's collapse?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 08, 2015, 05:14:02 AM
Collapse of Warsaw Radio Mast (1991)

Upon its completion in 1974, the Warsaw radio mast in Poland became the world's tallest structure. Standing 2,120 feet (646 m) tall, the tower was used for long-wave radio broadcasting. In 1991, the mast underwent repairs to exchange guy wires, the cables used to stabilize the tower. However, the mast bent and then snapped at approximately half its height. It was never rebuilt. What became the world's tallest structure upon the Warsaw radio mast's collapse?

Your mom
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 08, 2015, 05:44:08 AM
August 8, 1709,
The first known ascent in a hot-air balloon was made in Portugal by Father Bartolomeu de Gusmão - indoors - as a demonstration before the Portuguese court
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on August 08, 2015, 07:18:27 AM
August 7, 1970,
The Goose Lake International Music Festival was held in Leoni, Michigan. Over 200,000 fans attended the three day festival. Acts who appeared included, Jethro Tull, 10 Years After, Mountain, Chicago, Bob Seger, John Sebastian, James Gang, Stooges with Iggy Pop, Brownsville Station, MC5, Rod Stewart and Flying Burrito Brothers.
[url]http://youtu.be/1WoiuP5yvUM[/url] ([url]http://youtu.be/1WoiuP5yvUM[/url])


That was some fascinating info!

http://www.mlive.com/news/jackson/index.ssf/2010/08/post_28.html (http://www.mlive.com/news/jackson/index.ssf/2010/08/post_28.html)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goose_Lake_International_Music_Festival (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goose_Lake_International_Music_Festival)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/edwards_sa/553293167/in/album-72157613808408358/lightbox/ (https://www.flickr.com/photos/edwards_sa/553293167/in/album-72157613808408358/lightbox/)

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.277975,-84.2575594,1562m/data= (https://www.google.com/maps/@42.277975,-84.2575594,1562m/data=)!3m1!1e3

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 08, 2015, 10:07:36 AM
1974  President Richard Nixon resigns from the presidency as a result of the Watergate scandal.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on August 08, 2015, 06:00:35 PM
1974  President Richard Nixon resigns from the presidency as a result of the Watergate scandal.

A president that, in spite of many shortcomings, understood it was best for the country to resign after being impeached.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jim on August 08, 2015, 06:04:14 PM
1974  President Richard Nixon resigns from the presidency as a result of the Watergate scandal.

A president that, in spite of many shortcomings, understood it was best for the country to resign after being impeached.

I was a bit on the young side for the Nixon event, so it was Clinton to educate me that impeachment does not equate removal from office.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on August 09, 2015, 03:28:41 PM
Today in history we did it again. Nagasaki. Because they just didn't learn and the Russkies too.

BTW, the fire bombing continued. Because History.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 09, 2015, 03:36:56 PM
Today in history we did it again. Nagasaki. Because they just didn't learn and the Russkies too.

BTW, the fire bombing continued. Because History.

They didn't surrender quickly enough. And then, they didn't feel beaten when they surrendered.

Should have invaded them and crushed them. It was an awful thing the atomic bombs.

The Russkies just learned how to build one.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on August 09, 2015, 04:05:42 PM
Today in history we did it again. Nagasaki. Because they just didn't learn and the Russkies too.

BTW, the fire bombing continued. Because History.

They didn't surrender quickly enough. And then, they didn't feel beaten when they surrendered.

Should have invaded them and crushed them. It was an awful thing the atomic bombs.

The Russkies just learned how to build one.

One theory says that had we invaded the cost in lives could have been much higher than those lost to the two nukes.  The death toll from the bombing of Toyko is estimated at 75,000 to 200,000 lives alone.

On one hand, I agree- I hate the use.  On the other hand imagine if those had never been dropped, no one knew the real cost, and it finally took an event like the Cuban Missile Crisis for each side to fire 'em all off.

Alas Babylon.

 Of course, armchair quarterbacking is easy.   :bigsmile:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 10, 2015, 06:07:38 AM
1969  Charles Manson’s followers kill actress Sharon Tate and her three guests in her Beverly Hills home. :crazy:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 10, 2015, 10:46:20 AM
"Son of Sam" Serial Killer Arrested (1977)

Between 1976 and 1977, New York City was terrorized by a serial killer—later identified as David Berkowitz—who called himself the "Son of Sam" in letters to police. After his arrest in August 1977, Berkowitz confessed to killing six people and wounding seven others in the course of eight shootings. Berkowitz later claimed that he was commanded to kill by a demon who possessed his neighbor's dog. Why did thousands of women in New York cut or dye their hair when the perpetrator was still at large?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on August 10, 2015, 10:59:47 AM
Because reports of the killings identified a "common type" as the targets.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 11, 2015, 05:09:54 AM
August 11, 1896,
The first U.S. patent for an electric light bulb socket featuring an on-and-off pull chain was issued to Harvey Hubbell of Bridgeport, Connecticut (No. 565,541). On 8 Nov 1904, he patented a separable electric plug (No. 774250) adapting an Edison screw socket to a flat prong style. His inventions are now familiar throughout North America. His manufacturing company, Harvey Hubbell Inc. still exists today.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on August 11, 2015, 05:46:16 AM
8/11/1960


I was hatched.

Sent from my XT1058 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on August 11, 2015, 08:33:45 AM
8/11/1960 I was hatched.

Young punks...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 11, 2015, 09:48:56 AM
Young punks...
Goo goo.
Da Da.

This site is populated by those whose baby pictures are in colour, and those whose pictures are in black and white.
 :razz:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: squeezer on August 11, 2015, 11:16:00 AM
8/11/1960 I was hatched.

Young punks...
Yeah, I had no idea Cookie was just a kid.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on August 11, 2015, 02:33:53 PM
8/11/1960


I was hatched.

Sent from my XT1058 using Tapatalk

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 12, 2015, 05:33:52 AM
August 12, 1888,
Bertha Benz, wife of inventor Karl Benz, made the first motor tour. Without her husband's knowledge, she borrowed one of his cars and with their teenage sons travelled 180 km to visit relatives for 5 days. She drove her sons, Richard and Eugen, 14 and 15 years old, in Benz's newly-constructed “Patent Motorwagen” automobile from Mannheim to Pforzheim She thus became the first person to drive an automobile over more than just a very short distance. This was a distance of more than 106 km (more than fifty miles). Distances traveled before this trip were short and merely trials with mechanical assistants.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 13, 2015, 05:49:30 AM
Happy Birthday Annie Oakley (1860)


Oakley took up hunting at age nine and soon earned a reputation as a "dead shot." In her early 20s, she beat marksman Frank Butler in a shooting match and then married him. Together they joined Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. Oakley's famous act included hitting the thin edge of a playing card from 30 paces and shooting targets while looking into a mirror. She was also known for shooting the end off a cigarette held between Butler's lips, a trick she once performed with what future head of state?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 13, 2015, 06:16:20 AM
1704 – War of the Spanish Succession: Battle of Blenheim – English and Imperial forces are victorious over French and Bavarian troops.

One of those battles that was a turning point in European history and as important as Waterloo.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 14, 2015, 05:53:58 AM
August 14, 1979
Steve Hinton sets a new piston-engined airspeed record in a specially-modified P-51 Mustang named the Red Baron. He reaches 499 mph (803 km/h) over Nevada.
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 (http://s498.photobucket.com/user/RHallenbeck/media/RB-51/HDW-001-Reno2079_zps44ac62dc.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 14, 2015, 05:55:31 AM
1040 – King Duncan I is killed in battle against his first cousin and rival Macbeth. The latter succeeds him as King of Scotland.

Somebody really should write a play about that.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 14, 2015, 05:59:39 AM
1901 – The first claimed powered flight, by Gustave Whitehead in his Number 21.

Although nobody believed him.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 14, 2015, 06:00:20 AM
1945 – Japan accepts the Allied terms of surrender in World War II and the Emperor records the Imperial Rescript on Surrender (August 15 in Japan Standard Time).

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jet-A-Pumper on August 14, 2015, 09:52:08 AM
The Rocky Horror Picture Showwas released on this date in 1975.

"Let's do the time warp again!"

Now that worm will be in your head all day!  :bluduh:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on August 14, 2015, 10:32:22 AM
August 14, 1979
Steve Hinton sets a new piston-engined airspeed record in a specially-modified P-51 Mustang named the Red Baron. He reaches 499 mph (803 km/h) over Nevada.
You know damm well he was going for 500 mph.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 14, 2015, 01:06:12 PM
The Rocky Horror Picture Showwas released on this date in 1975.

"Let's do the time warp again!"

Now that worm will be in your head all day!  :bluduh:

I went to the third performance. Twas great.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 15, 2015, 06:09:12 AM
778 – The Battle of Roncevaux Pass, at which Roland is killed

Someone should write a poem about that.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roland
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on August 15, 2015, 09:25:54 AM
Roland the Headless Thompson Gunner?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 15, 2015, 10:28:02 AM
August 15, 1969,
Woodstock Festival was held on Max Yasgur's 600 acre farm in Bethel outside New York. Attended by over 400,000 people, the event featured, Jimi Hendrix, Crosby Stills Nash & Young, Santana, The Who, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin, The Band, Canned Heat, Joan Baez, Melanie, Ten Years After, Sly and the Family Stone, Johnny Winter, Jefferson Airplane, Ravi Shankar, Country Joe and the Fish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Arlo Guthrie, and Joe Cocker. During the three days there were three deaths, two births and four miscarriages.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 15, 2015, 01:01:15 PM
Roland the Headless Thompson Gunner?

 :rolf:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 15, 2015, 01:17:42 PM
Lest we forget-Victory over Japan (VJ) day.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 16, 2015, 05:55:47 AM
August 16, 1896
Gold is discovered in the Klondike of Canada’s Yukon Territory, setting off the Klondike Gold Rush.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on August 16, 2015, 07:27:22 AM
August 16th 1819, cavalry charged a peaceful protest in St Peter's Fields, Manchester, England killing 15. The event became known as the Peterloo Massacre.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 16, 2015, 07:45:09 AM
2012  In South Africa police fire on striking mine workers, killing at least 34.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 16, 2015, 10:30:43 AM
August 16th 1819, cavalry charged a peaceful protest in St Peter's Fields, Manchester, England killing 15. The event became known as the Peterloo Massacre.

One of the most important events in the radicalist history of Britain. Unlike the US at the time, most Britons did not have the vote. Also, the North of England had fewer members of parliament than the South, so were under-represented. The local magistrates took this political meeting to be a threat and sent armed calvary in to kill attenders. It was called Peterloo in a sarcastic reference to the recent battle of Waterloo.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 17, 2015, 02:17:26 AM
1585 – A first group of colonists sent by Sir Walter Raleigh under the charge of Ralph Lane lands in the New World to create Roanoke Colony on Roanoke Island, off the coast of present-day North Carolina.

Still a bit of a mystery as to what happened there.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 17, 2015, 05:35:44 AM
August 17, 1964,
Glasgow council in Scotland announced that all boys and men with Beatle styled haircuts would have to wear bathing caps after a committee was told that hair from 'Beatle-cuts' was clogging the pools filters.
People forget how much discrimination and downright danger came with wearing long hair back in the 60's.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on August 17, 2015, 08:21:51 AM
People forget how much discrimination and downright danger came with wearing long hair back in the 60's.

Some but not all.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Blunder on August 17, 2015, 08:35:33 AM
Happy birthday Bobby De Niro.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on August 18, 2015, 07:26:55 AM
People forget how much discrimination and downright danger came with wearing long hair back in the 60's.

Some but not all.

+1
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 18, 2015, 08:53:45 AM
Happy Birthday Virginia Dare (1587)

The first English child born in the Americas, Dare began her life in the colony of Roanoke in what is now the state of North Carolina. Strangely, the colony soon disappeared, and what became of Dare and the other colonists remains a mystery. In the 400 years since, Dare has become a prominent figure in American mythology and folklore. To many, she represents concepts like innocence and hope. Others use her name as a rallying cry for bigotry and sexism. How do historians know about her birth?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on August 18, 2015, 11:09:55 AM
People forget how much discrimination and downright danger came with wearing long hair back in the 60's.

Some but not all.

+1

Back in my Suzuki 350 days, I had an interesting encounter with some rednecks in a pickup truck. The power of the Zuke wasn't enough to simply "go plaid" when they chose to try and run me off the road at 3am. It was along an interstate. When it started, I tried to "speed" off but they then got right on my ass. I changed lanes and threw out the anchor but that gave them the advantage of being in front of me and trying to either get me to stop (speeds dropped to 5 mph at times) or rear end them. When I knew my options were limited, I crossed the median (before cable blocks, etc.) and went the other way only to see them follow. My eventual escape was to hit an exit and lose them in the tight curves of side streets.

Started calling it "Easy Rider Fever" after that since it was not too many years after the movie came out.

The comments about my long hair when walking into a diner on any given day were inconsequential given that context.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 19, 2015, 04:15:18 AM
1745 – Prince Charles Edward Stuart raises his standard in Glenfinnan: The start of the Second Jacobite Rebellion, known as "the 45".

Another enterprise that didn't go so well.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 19, 2015, 05:50:44 AM
1942 – World War II: Operation Jubilee: The 2nd Canadian Infantry Division leads an amphibious assault by allied forces on Dieppe, Seine-Maritime, France and fails, many Canadians are killed or captured. The operation was intended to develop and try new amphibious landing tactics for the coming full invasion in Normandy.

Been there and seen the site of the Dieppe landing. Respect to those soldiers-they never stood a chance.

.............................................

1942: Allies launch daring raid on Dieppe
Allied troops have pulled back after nine hours of heavy fighting on the French coast at Dieppe, north-west of Paris.

The withdrawal brings to an end the largest operation yet to include the army, navy and air force at the same time.

Combined Operations Headquarters have issued a statement from London saying the raid had been completed as planned.

"Vital experience has been gained in the employment of substantial numbers of troops in an assault, and in the transport and use of heavy equipment during combined operations," it said.

      
   Every tank that landed was lost, and over 65% of the 5,000 Canadians involved were either captured or killed.
   
People's War memories »
The plan, codenamed Operation Jubilee, was to open a front 11 miles (18km) long centred on the port of Dieppe.

The area was known to be heavily fortified and defended by the Germans, and strong resistance was expected.

Most of the 6,000-strong force was made up of Canadians, seeing front line action for the first time, as well as British, American and French soldiers.

The raid began when the troops set off in Royal Navy ships on the perilous journey across the Channel to the coast of occupied France.

One of the convoys was spotted by German naval convoy and attacked shortly after leaving.

Anti-aircraft shore batteries and patrol ships opened fire, sinking two German ships.

The troops arrived, along with the Royal Air Force, just before dawn.

Once the landings began on the beaches at Dieppe, troops met fierce resistance.

There was a constant bombardment from gun emplacements in the cliffs above, and casualties are described as "heavy" on both sides.

In the air, British pilots had a fierce confrontation with the Luftwaffe.

Several planes were lost in low-flying attacks on the German gun emplacements, and in all the RAF lost 95 aircraft - the most in a single day's fighting since the war started.

In a communiqué this evening, Combined Operations Headquarters pointed out that Operation Jubilee was not an invasion attempt - a message it repeated in a broadcast to France in the early hours of this morning.

The German account of the attack, issued from Hitler's headquarters, called the German defence a "great success", and said, "The enemy has suffered a devastating defeat in this landing attempt, which served only political purposes but defied all military reason."
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 19, 2015, 06:39:27 AM
1934   38 million Germans vote to make Adolf Hitler the official successor to President von Hindenburg.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 19, 2015, 07:21:31 AM
USS Constitution Defeats HMS Guerrière (1812)

The USS Constitution, better known as "Old Ironsides," is perhaps the most famous vessel in the history of the US Navy. One of the first frigates built for the Navy, the Constitution saw action in several wars and defeated the British frigate HMS Guerrière during the War of 1812. Later condemned as unseaworthy, the ship was saved from dismantling by public sentiment aroused by Oliver Wendell Holmes' poem "Old Ironsides." How did the wooden ship get its nickname?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 19, 2015, 07:59:33 AM
USS Constitution Defeats HMS Guerrière (1812)

The USS Constitution, better known as "Old Ironsides," is perhaps the most famous vessel in the history of the US Navy. One of the first frigates built for the Navy, the Constitution saw action in several wars and defeated the British frigate HMS Guerrière during the War of 1812. Later condemned as unseaworthy, the ship was saved from dismantling by public sentiment aroused by Oliver Wendell Holmes' poem "Old Ironsides." How did the wooden ship get its nickname?

Because it took a battering from HMS Guerriere and survived with little damage.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 19, 2015, 02:22:01 PM
1960: Moscow jails American U-2 spy pilot
The United States pilot, Francis Gary Powers, has been sentenced to 10 years in prison by a Soviet military court.

Powers had pleaded guilty to spying for the American Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) after his plane was shot down on 1 May at an altitude of about 68,000 ft (20,760 m), south of Sverdlovsk, 850 miles (1,368 km) east of Moscow.

The charge sheet said the route taken by Powers "left no doubt that it was a deliberate intrusion into the air space of the Soviet Union with hostile purposes".

Powers told the court the U-2 was designed and built for high-altitude flights. He had been told it could fly beyond the reach of anti-aircraft fire.

He described the moment the plane was hit: "I felt a hollow-sounding explosion. It was behind and there was a kind of orange flash."

In the wreckage of the U-2 were found films of Soviet airfields and other important military and industrial targets. A tape recording was found of the signals of certain Soviet radar stations.

Powers was asked why he made the 1 May flight. He said he assumed he was looking for rocket launching sites.

The court heard Powers was equipped with emergency gear, including money and gold, and there was a mechanism on the plane for destroying it to avoid capture. He also carried a poisoned pin to enable him to commit suicide in case of torture.

Powers told the court he was offered a well-paid job with the CIA after leaving the US Air Force.

He was told his work would involve flying along the borders of the Soviet Union with the purpose of picking up any radio or radar information.

Powers was asked if he now regretted making his last flight. He replied, "yes, very much".

He also apologised for the damage to US/Soviet relations. His plane was shot down on the eve of a superpower summit in Paris, which was subsequently called off. A visit by President Dwight Eisenhower to the Soviet Union was also cancelled.

In his final speech to the court, prosecutor Roman Rudenko outspokenly attacked the United States as inspirers and organisers of what he called "monstrous crimes" against peace.

He said the US had demonstrated "the real intention of making use of the provocative incursion of the U-2 plane into the Soviet air space as a pretext for wrecking a summit meeting, plunging the world again into the state of cold war, aggravating the tensions in international relations and putting a brake on the Great Powers' talks on disarmament".

Powers' wife Barbara and parents have been in court since the trial began three days ago. They are hoping to appeal against the sentence.

..................................................

The Powers verdict did not produce a great wave of indignation in America. Although President Eisenhower complained the sentence was too harsh - public feeling was that it could have been far worse.

On 10 February 1962, Gary Powers was freed in return for Soviet spy Colonel Rudolph Abel. The two men were exchanged in Berlin.

Relations between the two superpowers suffered another setback in October 1962, when a U-2 plane spotted Soviet missiles being deployed in Cuba. It led the two sides to the brink of nuclear war.

Captain Gary Powers ended up working as a helicopter pilot for a Los Angeles television station. He was killed in a helicopter crash in 1977.

In 2000, he received three posthumous awards from the US Air Force, including the Distinguished Flying Cross.

The US is still using U-2 planes for reconnaissance.

............................

Dunno why, they should have used Blackbirds...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 20, 2015, 05:53:04 AM
H.P. Lovecraft (1890)


A master of Gothic horror, fantasy, and science fiction, Howard Phillips Lovecraft was an American writer particularly noted for his many nightmarish short stories, most of which originally appeared in Weird Tales and other pulp magazines. Some of his best-known tales are part of the Cthulhu Mythos series, in which he invents an entire mythology of earthly origins, gods, and hideous otherworldly creatures. Many of Lovecraft's stories mention the Necronomicon, which is what?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on August 20, 2015, 06:32:41 AM
H.P. Lovecraft (1890)


A master of Gothic horror, fantasy, and science fiction, Howard Phillips Lovecraft was an American writer particularly noted for his many nightmarish short stories, most of which originally appeared in Weird Tales and other pulp magazines. Some of his best-known tales are part of the Cthulhu Mythos series, in which he invents an entire mythology of earthly origins, gods, and hideous otherworldly creatures. Many of Lovecraft's stories mention the Necronomicon, which is what?


An evil book of spells.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 20, 2015, 06:37:36 AM
August 20,  1923,
The first American-built rigid dirigible was launched in Lakehurst, N.J, later christened the U.S.S. Shenandoah (“daughter of the stars”). It was the first of the Zeppelin type (ZR-1) to use helium gas, of which a supply was was available in the U.S. It was tested in flight the following month, on 3 Sep 1923, and christened 10 Oct 1923. Covered with an aluminum-painted fabric, it was 680 feet long, weighed 36 tons, could bear 55 tons, and carry enough fuel to cruise 5,000 miles at an average speed of 65 mph. It was commanded by Commander Zachery Lansdowne (1888-1925), an early Navy aviator, who died with 14 members of the crew when the airship was struck and destroyed in a violent thunderstorm on 3 Sep 1925 over Caldwell, Ohio, though 29 of the crew survived.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on August 20, 2015, 11:38:15 AM
Many of Lovecraft's stories mention the Necronomicon, which is what?

A phone book of the dead.

It's not a spell book per se as much as a book listing what is, essentially, the souls of the dead. Using it you can call them. AKA "a phone book".

Look at the roots of the word:

Necro
Nom
Icon
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: xsrider on August 20, 2015, 11:45:15 AM
August 20, 1974       US Vice President Gerald Ford, who had replaced Spiro Agnew, assumes the Office of the President after Richard Nixon resigns; Ford names Nelson Rockefeller as VP.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on August 20, 2015, 05:17:14 PM
August 20, 2013:  A giant meteor comes in over Russia and explodes.

The world reacts, but does nothing.  We will need a massive loss of life before we create a worldwide asteroid detection and repulsion system.  It's how we roll.

https://youtu.be/6w2AsGazCcg (http://youtu.be/6w2AsGazCcg)

http://youtu.be/UqrA007yZWQ (http://youtu.be/UqrA007yZWQ)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 21, 2015, 05:05:42 AM
August 21,2005,
Robert Moog, inventor of the synthesiser died aged 71, four months after being diagnosed with brain cancer. Dr Moog built his first electronic instrument, a theremin - aged 14 and made the MiniMoog, "the first compact, easy-to-use synthesiser" in 1970. He won the Polar prize, Sweden's "music Nobel prize", in 2001. Wendy Carlos' 1968 Grammy award-winning album, Switched-On Bach, brought Dr Moog to prominence.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 21, 2015, 07:32:13 AM
Great American Duck Race

This uniquely American event started in 1980 in Deming, New Mexico. Up to 80 live ducks race for cash prizes in an eight-lane chute. There are races that include politicians' heats and a media heat. Other features include a parade, dances, hot-air balloons, an arts and crafts exhibit, a pageant of people dressed like ducks, and a duck contest in which ducks are dressed like people. Race participants come from several states; spectators now number about 20,000, almost double the population of Deming.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 21, 2015, 07:33:19 AM
August 20, 1974       US Vice President Gerald Ford, who had replaced Spiro Agnew, assumes the Office of the President after Richard Nixon resigns; Ford names Nelson Rockefeller as VP.

Ford was also the first person to be VP and Pres without being elected to either office.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 21, 2015, 07:34:54 AM
August 20, 2013:  A giant meteor comes in over Russia and explodes.

The world reacts, but does nothing.  We will need a massive loss of life before we create a worldwide asteroid detection and repulsion system.  It's how we roll.


If the meteor hit the USA then there would have been a huge outcry and much money would have been spent and nothing much would have changed.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: SuperHans on August 21, 2015, 08:34:27 AM
I'm a day late but,

August 20, 1966 Darrell Lance Abbott was born. Better know as Dimebag Darrell, a founding member of Pantera and Damageplan.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on August 21, 2015, 07:41:00 PM

I'm a day late but,

August 20, 1966 Darrell Lance Abbott was born. Better know as Dimebag Darrell, a founding member of Pantera and Damageplan.


http://youtu.be/RVMvART9kb8


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 22, 2015, 06:34:31 AM
1973 – A bank robbery gone wrong in Stockholm, Sweden, turns into a hostage crisis; over the next five days the hostages begin to sympathise with their captors, leading to the term "Stockholm syndrome".
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 22, 2015, 07:17:53 AM
August 22, 1939,
The Aerosol container.
The first U.S. patent for dispensing liquids under pressure from a disposable container was issued to Julius Seth Kahn of New York City (No. 2,170,531). The patent was titled "Apparatus For Mixing a Liquid With a Gas," but was the predecessor of the aerosol spray can. In this case, the patent more particularly specified a use for whipping cream "by discharging the cream and gas mixture through a constricted orifice." The cream could be contained in a common soda-pop glass bottle. Gas could be introduced at controlled pressure. An inexpensive valve discharged the whipped cream. Its use was extended to applications such as dispensing paints, pharmaceuticals and insecticides.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on August 22, 2015, 08:49:06 AM
August 22, 1939,
The Aerosol container.
The first U.S. patent for dispensing liquids under pressure from a disposable container was issued to Julius Seth Kahn of New York City (No. 2,170,531). The patent was titled "Apparatus For Mixing a Liquid With a Gas," but was the predecessor of the aerosol spray can. In this case, the patent more particularly specified a use for whipping cream "by discharging the cream and gas mixture through a constricted orifice." The cream could be contained in a common soda-pop glass bottle. Gas could be introduced at controlled pressure. An inexpensive valve discharged the whipped cream. Its use was extended to applications such as dispensing paints, pharmaceuticals and insecticides.

mmmmmm........whipits
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 23, 2015, 06:09:54 AM
1926  American film star Rudolph Valentino dies, causing world-wide hysteria and a number of suicides.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 23, 2015, 06:12:02 AM
1305  Scottish patriot William Wallace is hanged, drawn, beheaded, and quartered in London.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 23, 2015, 06:49:52 AM
1305  Scottish patriot William Wallace is hanged, drawn, beheaded, and quartered in London.

For, amongst other charges, serious atrocities against civilians.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: olderigetfasteriam on August 23, 2015, 09:37:17 PM
Today I have collected $2000.00 in donations (100.00 check to deposit)! Thanks STO!

http://main.nationalmssociety.org/site/TR/Walk/AZAWalkEvents?px=2122360&pg=personal&fr_id=26286 (http://main.nationalmssociety.org/site/TR/Walk/AZAWalkEvents?px=2122360&pg=personal&fr_id=26286)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 24, 2015, 02:41:36 AM
1967 – Led by Abbie Hoffman, the Youth International Party temporarily disrupts trading at the New York Stock Exchange by throwing dollar bills from the viewing gallery, causing trading to cease as brokers scramble to grab them.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 24, 2015, 05:42:43 AM
August 24, 1814
British troops under General Robert Ross capture Washington, D.C., which they set on fire in retaliation for the American burning of the parliament building in York (Toronto), the capital of Upper Canada.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 24, 2015, 06:29:04 AM
1981   Mark David Chapman sentenced to 20 years to life for murdering former Beatles band member John Lennon.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 24, 2015, 07:39:19 AM
Liberia Flag Day

The Liberian flag bears a striking resemblance to the American flag, a reminder of the historical ties between this West African country and the United States. Eleven horizontal stripes represent the signers of the Liberian Declaration of Independence, while the single white star signifies Liberia's former position as the sole free black state in Africa. Flag Day, a patriotic day paying homage to Liberia's national emblem, is an official public holiday. Citizens and public buildings display their flags, and parades often feature schoolchildren and military units.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 24, 2015, 07:40:28 AM
Duke Paoa Kahinu Mokoe Hulikohola Kahanamoku (August 24, 1890 – January 22, 1968) was an American competition swimmer of ethnic Hawaiian background who was also known as an actor, lawman, early beach volleyball player and businessman credited with spreading the sport of surfing.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on August 24, 2015, 03:03:31 PM
August 24, 1814
British troops under General Robert Ross capture Washington, D.C., which they set on fire in retaliation for the American burning of the parliament building in York (Toronto), the capital of Upper Canada.


And the question that goes with this.

First Lady Dolley Madison refused to leave the White House until just moments before British troops arrived, gathering valuables, documents, and other items of importance, including what notable painting?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 24, 2015, 04:02:11 PM
It has to be something to do with George Washington.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on August 24, 2015, 05:13:40 PM
August 24, 1814
British troops under General Robert Ross capture Washington, D.C., which they set on fire in retaliation for the American burning of the parliament building in York (Toronto), the capital of Upper Canada.



And the question that goes with this.

First Lady Dolley Madison refused to leave the White House until just moments before British troops arrived, gathering valuables, documents, and other items of importance, including what notable painting?


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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on August 24, 2015, 06:43:38 PM
I was thinking a Frazetta poster, but that will do.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on August 24, 2015, 07:07:01 PM
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?  My teenage fantasy.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on August 25, 2015, 06:39:22 AM
1948  The House Un-American Activities Committee holds first-ever televised congressional hearing.
The start of some very strange days.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on August 25, 2015, 06:40:16 AM
    
1974: Human cannonball misses target-UK


A woman fired from a cannon in Bristol failed to break the English record for the second time.

She was so useless, as were her support crew, that everyone ended up in the River Avon. Again.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on August 25, 2015, 07:19:38 AM
August 25, 1875
"Captain" Matthew Webb becomes the first man to swim across the English Channel.
His final stunt was to be a dangerous swim through the Whirlpool Rapids on the Niagara River below Niagara Falls, a feat many observers considered suicidal. Although Webb failed in an attempt at raising interest in funding the event, on 24 July 1883, he jumped into the river from a small boat located near the Niagara Falls Suspension Bridge and began his swim. Accounts of the time indicate that in all likelihood Webb successfully survived the first part of the swim, but died in the section of the river located near the entrance to the whirlpool.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 03, 2015, 07:14:03 AM
Malcolm Campbell Becomes First to Drive over 300 MPH (1935)

Campbell, an English automobile and speedboat racer, set many speed records for motorcycles, airplanes, automobiles, and motorboats. In 1931, he was knighted for his accomplishments. Four years later, driving his famed automobile Bluebird at Bonneville Flats, Utah, Campbell set his final land speed record, becoming the first person to drive an automobile faster than 300 mph (483 km/h). He later turned to speedboat racing and set a new record in 1939, when his boat reached what speed?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 04, 2015, 06:28:29 AM
Terminal velocity!

September 4, 1965,
The Who had their van stolen containing over £5000 worth of equipment outside the Battersea Dogs Home. The band were inside the home at the time buying a guard dog.
 :baldy:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 04, 2015, 07:16:48 AM
1998  Google founded by Stanford University students Larry Page and Sergey Brin.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 04, 2015, 07:27:06 AM
Maiden Flight of the First US Airship (1923)

The USS Shenandoah was the first American-built rigid dirigible. Its design was based on a German zeppelin downed during WWI, and it was the first ship to be filled with helium—making it safer than hydrogen-filled crafts. A year after its maiden voyage, it became the first rigid airship to cross North America. While on another tour in 1925, it passed through a storm and was torn apart. Thirteen crew members died in the crash. How did those who survived the disaster manage to do so?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 05, 2015, 06:00:48 AM
September 5, 1982
Douglas Bader, RAF fighter pilot in World War II, died. Bader was a successful fighter pilot, claiming 22 German planes shot down in WWII. He claimed the fifth highest total in the RAF, despite having lost both legs in a pre-war flying accident. He was shot down 1941 and spent the rest of the war in a German prison camp. He made so many escape attempts that the Germans threatened to take his prosthetic legs away from him.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on September 05, 2015, 07:25:43 AM
He made so many escape attempts that the Germans threatened to take his prosthetic legs away from him.
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That's awesome. 
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 05, 2015, 11:01:23 AM
He made so many escape attempts that the Germans threatened to take his prosthetic legs away from him.
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That's awesome.


A film was made about him. It'll be on the net somewhere.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 06, 2015, 05:26:50 AM
1997  Funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales: over 1 million people line London’s streets to honor her and 2.5 billion watched the event on TV.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 06, 2015, 05:58:17 AM
6 September 1919
Major Rudolph William Schroeder, Chief Test Pilot of the Engineering Division, McCook field, Ohio, with Lieutenant G.W. Elsey as a passenger, flew a Packard Lepère LUSAC 11 biplane to two Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) World Records, reaching an altitude of 8,616 meters (28,267.72 feet).

The biplane was powered by a turbo-supercharged 1,649.3-cubic-inch-displacement (27.03 liter) liquid-cooled Liberty L-12 single overhead cam (SOHC) 45° V-12 engine which produced 449 horsepower at 2,000 r.p.m.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 07, 2015, 06:13:43 AM
Sept. 7, 1968,
Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones and John Bonham made their live debut as Led Zeppelin but billed as The New Yardbirds at Teen Club in Gladsaxe (a suburb in the outskirts of Copenhagen, Denmark). Around 1,200 youngsters attended the show at Egegard School. Teen Club President Lars Abel introducing 'The New Yardbirds' on stage introduced Robert Plant as Robert Plat. A local review stated; 'Their performance and their music were absolutely flawless, and the music continued to ring nicely in the ears for some time after the curtains were drawn after their show. We can therefore conclude that the new Yardbirds are at least as good as the old ones were'.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 07, 2015, 06:38:35 AM
Last Captive Thylacine Dies in Hobart Zoo (1936)

The thylacine, known also as the Tasmanian wolf and Tasmanian tiger, was a carnivorous marsupial once found on the Australian mainland, New Guinea, and Tasmania. Often cited as an example of convergent evolution, it was superficially similar to a wolf or dog, though it evolved entirely independently of these animals. It was hunted to probable extinction in the 1930s, and the last captive thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in 1936. How many thylacine sightings have been reported since then?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 07, 2015, 06:39:20 AM
Born today Buddy Holly (1936)

An early rock 'n' roll star, Holly began as a country-and-western singer and gradually added rhythm-and-blues elements to his innovative style. With his band, the Crickets, he established the standard rock instrumentation of two guitars, bass, and drums, and toured the US extensively for two years before his death in a plane crash. He became one of rock's most enduring cult figures and much of his material was released posthumously. Who else died in the plane crash that killed him?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on September 07, 2015, 09:10:23 AM
The Big Bopper.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Loki on September 07, 2015, 09:34:10 AM
Richie Valens.

Who gave up his seat so Ritchie could ride in the plane?


L;
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 08, 2015, 05:39:14 AM
Sept. 8, 1930,
Scotch tape was developed by Richard G. Drew at 3M, St. Paul Minn. Originally, 3M only made sandpaper, and during testing Drew observed at a local auto bodyshop that auto painters had difficulty making clean dividing lines on two-color paint jobs. After two years of effort in the company's labs, he invented masking tape (1925), a tan paper tape with a light, pressure sensitive adhesive backing. Five years later, he invented Scotch Brand Cellulose Tape, the first waterproof, see-through, pressure-sensitive tape. Once marketed, the public found the tape had a wide range popular applications in mending, sealing and joining.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 08, 2015, 06:53:11 AM
1504  Michelangelo’s 13-foot marble statue of David is unveiled in Florence, Italy.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on September 08, 2015, 01:10:26 PM
I was born.   :bigok:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on September 08, 2015, 01:11:47 PM
I was born.   :bigok:
Happy Birthday! :bigok:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 08, 2015, 01:12:16 PM
Happy Birthday, Teach!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: PatM on September 08, 2015, 01:47:08 PM
Happy Birthday, Clay   :bigok:













and Ed.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 08, 2015, 01:47:37 PM
HBD, Sir!
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: olderigetfasteriam on September 08, 2015, 09:40:25 PM
Yeah, happy birthday!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: xsrider on September 08, 2015, 11:50:10 PM
September 8, 1921    Margaret Gorman of Washington, D.C., is named the first Miss America.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 09, 2015, 12:11:10 AM
1504  Michelangelo’s 13-foot marble statue of David is unveiled in Florence, Italy.

Sept. 8, 1930,
Scotch tape was developed by Richard G. Drew at 3M, St. Paul Minn.

After two years of effort in the company's labs, he invented masking tape (1925), a tan paper tape with a light, pressure sensitive adhesive backing. Five years later, he invented Scotch Brand Cellulose Tape, the first waterproof, see-through, pressure-sensitive tape

If 'ol Mike had only had that masking tape that Flyer posted about, painting the ceiling of that tiny little church would have gone a hell of a LOT faster.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 09, 2015, 05:24:08 AM
Sept. 9 1945,
The first “bug” in a computer program was discovered by Grace Hopper: a moth was removed with tweezers from a relay and taped into the log.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 09, 2015, 07:32:13 AM
1087  William the Conquerer, Duke of Normandy and King of England, dies in Rouen while conducting a war which began when the French king made fun of him for being fat.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 09, 2015, 11:03:48 AM
QE II becomes the longest reigning monarch of England.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on September 09, 2015, 03:21:50 PM
1087  William the Conquerer, Duke of Normandy and King of England, dies in Rouen while conducting a war which began when the French king made fun of him for being fat.
So I guess maybe that's why he was also called William the Bastard.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 10, 2015, 05:40:13 AM
September 10, 1956
During first flight of North American F-107A at Edwards AFB, California, prototype, 55-5118, experiences problem with engine gear box differential pressure during a dive, North American test pilot Bob Baker lands on dry lakebed at just under 200 knots (370 km/h), after rolling about a mile, aircraft hits a depression in the lakebed, nose gear collapses. Jet slides ~ three-tenths of a mile on its nose, but suffers limited damage, no fire. Total landing roll was 22,000 feet (6,700 m). Airframe repaired in under two weeks.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Scratch on September 10, 2015, 09:01:36 AM
1087  William the Conquerer, Duke of Normandy and King of England, dies in Rouen while conducting a war which began when the French king made fun of him for being fat.
So I guess maybe that's why he was also called William the Bastard.

William the FAT Bastard!!

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 10, 2015, 12:00:38 PM
Belize National Day

A public holiday in Belize commemorating the Battle of St. George's Caye, fought in 1798 between the Spanish and the English over possession of the area. English loggers had settled in what is now Belize in the early 17th century, and British pirates used to hide in the cays there waiting for opportunities to plunder passing Spanish ships. It is also known as St. George's Caye Day. Numerous festivities take place on the days leading up to the holiday, including a grand carnival parade
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 11, 2015, 05:00:35 AM
Better late than never.  :shrug:
Sept. 11, 1822,
It was announced by the College of Cardinals that henceforth “the printing and publication of works treating of the motion of the earth and the stability of the sun, in accordance with the opinion of modern astronomers, is permitted.” When two weeks later Pope Pius VII ratified the Cardinals' decree, the Catholic Church finally officially accepted the Copernican principle that on 22 Jun 1633 Italian scientist Galileo had been imprisoned for championing. It was not until 1835 that the Vatican removed Galileo's Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems from its list of banned books. Finally 31 Oct 1992, the Catholic Church admitted that Galileo had been correct.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 11, 2015, 05:54:48 AM
September 11, 2001

Well you know the rest........

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 12, 2015, 01:27:22 AM
1087  William the Conquerer, Duke of Normandy and King of England, dies in Rouen while conducting a war which began when the French king made fun of him for being fat.
So I guess maybe that's why he was also called William the Bastard.

William the FAT Bastard!!

His corpse exploded a few days after his death.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 12, 2015, 05:57:57 AM
Another 9-11 late one.

The Blue Ridge Parkway construction was started.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 12, 2015, 05:58:34 AM
Happy Birthday Richard Jordan Gatling (1818)

Gatling, an inventor who began his career creating agricultural devices including a rice-sewing machine and a steam plow, is best remembered as the creator of a rapid-firing gun that was the precursor of the modern machine gun. He offered his Gatling gun to the Union army in the Civil War, but only a few were put into use toward the war's end. For a time, Gatling worked on improving the gun, but he eventually went back to devising agricultural machinery. What were some of his other inventions?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 12, 2015, 05:59:01 AM
September 12, 1945
Pilot 1st Lt. Robert J. Anspach attempts to ferry captured Focke Wulf Fw 190F, FE-113, coded '10', from Newark Army Air Base, New Jersey, where it had been offloaded from the HMS Reaper, to Freeman Field, Indiana for testing. While letting down for refuelling stop at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a faulty electrical horizontal trim adjustment switch goes to full-up position, cannot be manually overridden. Pilot spots small dirt strip, the Hollidaysburg Airport, S of Altoona, Pennsylvania, and makes emergency landing. Upon applying brakes, right one fails immediately, fighter pivots left, landing gear collapses, propeller rips away. Pilot uninjured, but Fw 190 is hauled to Middletown Air Depot, Pennsylvania, and scrapped. Prop ends up on wall of local flying club. The press never gets wind of the accident, nor of the 19 August Messerschmitt Me 262 crash landing at Pittsburgh.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 12, 2015, 06:00:47 AM
Bad Durkheim Wurstmarkt

Although called Bad Durkheim Wurstmarkt, or Sausage Fair, this is actually Germany's biggest wine festival—the name is said to have originated about 150 years ago because of the immense amounts of sausage consumed. The opening day of the festival features a concert and a procession of bands, vineyard proprietors, and tapsters of the tavern stalls with decorated wine floats. The following days are a medley of fireworks, band playing, dancing, and singing through the night. Wine is served in glasses called Schoppen that hold about a pint.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on September 12, 2015, 06:25:41 AM
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 12, 2015, 06:27:09 AM
September 12, 1945
Pilot 1st Lt. Robert J. Anspach attempts to ferry captured Focke Wulf Fw 190F, FE-113, coded '10', from Newark Army Air Base, New Jersey, where it had been offloaded from the HMS Reaper, to Freeman Field, Indiana for testing. While letting down for refuelling stop at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a faulty electrical horizontal trim adjustment switch goes to full-up position, cannot be manually overridden. Pilot spots small dirt strip, the Hollidaysburg Airport, S of Altoona, Pennsylvania, and makes emergency landing. Upon applying brakes, right one fails immediately, fighter pivots left, landing gear collapses, propeller rips away. Pilot uninjured, but Fw 190 is hauled to Middletown Air Depot, Pennsylvania, and scrapped. Prop ends up on wall of local flying club. The press never gets wind of the accident, nor of the 19 August Messerschmitt Me 262 crash landing at Pittsburgh.
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Typical German engineering.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 12, 2015, 06:33:08 AM
490 BC – Battle of Marathon: The conventionally accepted date for the Battle of Marathon. The Athenians and their Plataean allies, defeat the first Persian invasion force of Greece.

Probably the most important battle in Western history. Without the Greek success, the history of Europe and the Americas (and the world) would have been very different.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 12, 2015, 09:27:25 AM
Typical German engineering.
Without nickel and high strength steels the Nazis were still using wooden props (at over 2000 hp.), and low strength alloys in the compressor stages of their jet engines and landing gear stancions.
It's a wonder they were functional at all.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on September 12, 2015, 07:38:01 PM
Typical German engineering.
Without nickel and high strength steels the Nazis were still using wooden props (at over 2000 hp.), and low strength alloys in the compressor stages of their jet engines and landing gear stancions.
It's a wonder they were functional at all.


...and they still were the pioness of jet flight!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 13, 2015, 06:07:17 AM
September 13, 1974
The U. S. Air Force SR-71 Blackbird 61-17972, flown by Captain Harold B. “Buck” Adams (pilot) and Major William C. Machorek (reconnaissance systems officer), flies 5,447 miles (8,771 km) from London to Los Angeles in a world record 3 hours 47 min 39 seconds at an average speed of 1,435.59 mph (2,311.74 km/h).
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 13, 2015, 07:36:24 AM
1515  King Francis of France defeats the Swiss army under Cardinal Matthias Schiner at Marignano, northern Italy.

I'm putting this event in just because every time I see whats happend a certain day, the French are doing battle with someone. WTF was wrong with those guys? On this day,different years, they were at war with the Brits, Spanish and swiss.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 13, 2015, 07:37:55 AM
Milton S. Hershey (1857)

After serving as apprentice to a Lancaster, Pennsylvania, confectioner, Hershey opened his own candy store in Philadelphia. By 1886, he was back in Lancaster, where he soon found success making caramels using fresh milk. By 1900, he had sold his caramel business to concentrate on chocolate. In 1903, he built a factory to manufacture five-cent chocolate bars, which became so popular that "Hershey" became virtually synonymous with chocolate in the US. To what causes did Hershey donate his fortune?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 13, 2015, 07:39:24 AM
McClure Bean Soup Festival

A group of Civil War veterans met in Bannerville, Pennsylvania, in 1883 to organize a Grand Army of the Republic Post, and when they served a special bean soup at their first meeting, it was such a hit that they eventually invited the public to a "real Civil War bean soup dinner" in 1891. Today, thousands of gallons of bean soup are prepared in 35-gallon kettles. The recipe is based on the original Civil War recipe, and it is served to over 70,000 people. The festival also includes political speeches, exhibits, parades, nightly entertainment, and amusement rides.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 13, 2015, 11:17:33 AM
McClure Bean Soup Festival.
Including a Quilt Show and Beauty Pageant!
Road Trip!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on September 15, 2015, 11:21:43 AM
google.com registered

and the world will never be the same
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on September 16, 2015, 08:16:01 AM
McClure Bean Soup Festival.
Including a Quilt Show and Beauty Pageant!
Road Trip!
I just can't put bean soup and beauty pageant together in my mind
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on September 16, 2015, 09:36:34 AM
I can. Just imagine a very fast swim suit competition where all the contestants get on/off stage with jet propulsion.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on September 16, 2015, 01:10:03 PM
I can. Just imagine a very fast swim suit competition where all the contestants get on/off stage with jet propulsion.
Ohh..  I'd rather not.  Much rather.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: stew71 on September 16, 2015, 01:48:35 PM
Born today in 1925 in Itta Bena, Mississippi.

 :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail:

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 16, 2015, 02:37:10 PM
Happy Birthday Mr. King!
 :clap: :clap: :clap:

Sept. 16,1977,
29-year-old former T Rex singer Marc Bolan was killed instantly when the car driven by his girlfriend, Gloria Jones, left the road and hit a tree in Barnes, London. Miss Jones broke her jaw in the accident. The couple were on the way to Bolan's home in Richmond after a night out at a Mayfair restaurant. A local man who witnessed the crash said, 'When I arrived a girl was lying on the bonnet and a man with long dark curly hair was stretched out in the road - there was a hell of a mess.'
http://youtu.be/VPHKVWCxHtI (http://youtu.be/VPHKVWCxHtI)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 17, 2015, 05:53:00 AM
Sept. 17, 1978,
The video for Queen's single 'Bicycle Race' was filmed at Wimbledon Stadium, Wimbledon, UK. It featured 65 naked female professional models racing around the stadium's track on bicycles, which had been hired for the day. The rental company was reported to have requested payment for all the saddles when they found out how their bikes had been used.
(Probably re-sold online...  :naughty: ).
http://youtu.be/xt0V0_1MS0Q?list=RDxt0V0_1MS0Q (http://youtu.be/xt0V0_1MS0Q?list=RDxt0V0_1MS0Q)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 17, 2015, 06:13:07 AM
While Freddie didn't want to be President of the United States Joshua A. Norton Declares Himself Emperor of the US (1859)

Though Norton arrived in San Francisco during the California gold rush, he took up speculating in rice, a valuable commodity at the time, rather than prospecting. Unfortunately, he ended up losing his fortune, after which he vanished for a short time. When he reappeared, he was wearing a costume resembling that of France's Napoleon III and calling himself "Emperor Norton." For the next 13 years, he paraded around the city issuing "proclamations" and even banknotes. How was he treated by police?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on September 17, 2015, 10:00:17 AM
As a nutter but harmless.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 19, 2015, 11:17:46 AM
Sept. 19, 1973,
Country rock singer, songwriter 26-year-old Gram Parsons, formerly of The Byrds and The Flying Burrito Brothers, died under mysterious conditions in Joshua Tree, California. His death was attributed to heart failure but later was officially announced as a drug overdose. His coffin was stolen by two of his associates, manager Phil Kaufman and Michael Martin, a former roadie for The Byrds, and was taken to Cap Rock in the California desert, where it was set alight, in accordance to Parson's wishes. The two were later arrested by police.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 19, 2015, 01:45:23 PM
1993: Two boys charged with toddler's murder


Two 10-year-old boys have been charged with the abduction and murder of two-year-old James Bulger in Liverpool.

This is a case that still scares parents in Britain today. The little boy was abducted by two older boys and then tortured and finally stoned to death. Both offenders spent time in secure children's units and for a short while, prison. One has reoffended and is serving a sentence for paedophilia. The other is in a stable, gay relationship. Both have had new identities given to them.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 19, 2015, 01:58:07 PM
On a cheerier and more heroic note:

    
1962: US spaceman orbits Earth
The first American to orbit the Earth has landed safely in the Atlantic Ocean.

Marine Lieutenant John Glenn, 40, travelled about 81,000 miles (more than 130,000km) as he circled the globe three times at more than 17,000 mph (27,000kph).
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 19, 2015, 10:37:49 PM
On a cheerier and more heroic note:

    
1962: US spaceman orbits Earth
The first American to orbit the Earth has landed safely in the Atlantic Ocean.

Marine Lieutenant John Glenn, 40, travelled about 81,000 miles (more than 130,000km) as he circled the globe three times at more than 17,000 mph (27,000kph).

Did he ever collect on his AirMiles though???
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 20, 2015, 08:23:06 AM
I can. Just imagine a very fast swim suit competition where all the contestants get on/off stage with jet propulsion.
What colour is the sky on your planet?
 :popcorn:

Sept. 20, 1853,
Elisha Graves Otis sold his first safety elevator equipment, having started his business earlier in the year to sell the safety elevator system he had invented the year before. His customer was Benjamin Newhouse in New York City who used it for moving freight. Shortly thereafter, in May 1854, at the Crystal Palace in New York City, Otis created public interest with a daring demonstration. He was hoisted high in the air on a platform fitted with his safety feature. When he called for the rope to be cut, the safety device stopped his fall. By 1857, he installed the first department store passenger elevator at E.V. Haughwout & Co. in New York City. In 1889 he applied the electric motor to power elevators.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 20, 2015, 09:27:18 AM
1692   Giles Corey is pressed to death for standing mute and refusing to answer charges of witchcraft brought against him. He is the only person in America to have suffered this punishment.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 20, 2015, 09:49:20 AM
1692   Giles Corey is pressed to death for standing mute and refusing to answer charges of witchcraft brought against him. He is the only person in America to have suffered this punishment.

The last case in England was in 1735 in the Sussex town of Horsham. The advantage of remaining mute was that your property was not confiscated by the Crown, so Mr Corey protected his family from poverty.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 22, 2015, 06:02:58 AM
Sept. 22, 1979
Former member of the James Gang and current Eagles member Joe Walsh announces he will run for President of the US.
Coulda bin a contenda...
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 23, 2015, 03:55:35 PM
Happy Birthday Typhoid Mary (1869)

Mary Mallon was the first person in the US to be identified as a healthy carrier of typhoid fever. In 1904, a typhoid epidemic was traced to homes where she had been a cook. She fled but was located by authorities and forcibly quarantined for several years. In 1910, she was released on the condition that she not take another food-handling job. Discovered cooking again in 1914, she was quarantined for life. Though she herself never had the disease, she infected about 50 people. How many died?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 24, 2015, 05:05:34 AM
Secret Executive Order Allegedly Establishes Majestic 12 (1947)

Majestic 12 is the purported code name of a secret committee of scientists, military leaders, and government officials supposedly formed in 1947 by an executive order of US President Harry S. Truman. A major part of alien conspiracy theories, the committee was purportedly formed to investigate the aftermath of the Roswell incident—the alleged crash of an unidentified flying object near Roswell, New Mexico. What documents have lent credence to the existence of such a committee?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 24, 2015, 06:15:28 AM
Sept. 24, 1889,
Alexander Dey patented the dial time recorder. This style of time clock was first manufactured by the Dey Company and then as Industrial Time Recorders (ITR) after 1907. It used a dial that employees were required to point to their assigned number, and press to record the time of arrival and departure. The numbers of the employees and times were recorded on a sheet of paper wrapped around a drum.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 24, 2015, 01:47:52 PM
1890 – The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints officially renounces polygamy.

Yeah, right.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 24, 2015, 09:43:35 PM
1890 – The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints officially renounces polygamy.

Yeah, right.

That is why I am not a Mormon.  Oh ya and the alcohol and caffine thing too.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 25, 2015, 04:09:56 AM
1890 – The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints officially renounces polygamy.

Yeah, right.

Well. the mainstream church did.

There are still the splitter groups. Warren Jeffs Et Al.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 25, 2015, 07:06:49 AM
1890 – The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints officially renounces polygamy.

Yeah, right.

Well. the mainstream church did.

There are still the splitter groups. Warren Jeffs Et Al.

It's more prevalent than people think.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 25, 2015, 07:12:43 AM
1974  Scientists warn that continued use of aerosol sprays will cause ozone depletion, which will lead to an increased risk of skin cancer and global weather changes.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 25, 2015, 07:30:55 AM
1906 – In the presence of the king and before a great crowd, Leonardo Torres y Quevedo successfully demonstrates the invention of the Telekino in the port of Bilbao, guiding a boat from the shore, in what is considered the birth of the remote control.

Launching a raft of model aircraft, no doubt.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 26, 2015, 06:02:33 AM
1983  In the USSR Stanislav Petrov disobeys procedures and ignores electronic alarms indicating five incoming nuclear missiles, believing the US would launch more than five if it wanted to start a war. His decision prevented a retaliatory attack that would have begun a nuclear war between the superpowers.. :eek:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Jim on September 26, 2015, 07:33:33 AM
Today for history, I say "Thank You" to Mr. Petrov
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on September 26, 2015, 01:07:23 PM
1890 – The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints officially renounces polygamy.

Yeah, right.

Well. the mainstream church did.

There are still the splitter groups. Warren Jeffs Et Al.

It's more prevalent than people think.

Oh yeah, we have Canadian FLDS groups in Bountiful BC.

Started and run by the Blackmore clan.

Bunch of loonies.

And don't get me started on that stupid Sister Wives show on TV.
Never watch it, but I'm aware of it..... Subjected to the commercials now and then.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 26, 2015, 05:24:41 PM
Bunch of loonies.

The kids are alright.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 27, 2015, 02:36:25 AM
1825   The first locomotive to haul a passenger train was operated by George Stephenson in England.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 27, 2015, 05:55:22 AM
Sept. 27, 1908,
The first production Ford Model T car left the factory. It was assembled at the Piquette Avenue Plant in Detroit, Michigan, which had built various earlier models (Models B, D, F, K, N, R, S) in prior four years. The Model T was introduced on 1 Oct 1908. It had a 20-hp 4-cylinder engine, with versions starting at $850. The first 12,000 model Ts were built at this plant, before production was transferred to a new, larger factory at Highland Park. It was produced for 19 years, until by  26 May 1927, some 15 million had been manufactured, making a historic impact on society. Refining the process over the years reduced production time by 1913 from 12-hr 8-min to 1-hr 33-min. By the end of Model T era, a vehicle left the assembly line every 24-sec. Black paint was the quickest to dry.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 27, 2015, 06:04:20 AM
1944  Thousands of British troops are killed as German forces rebuff their massive effort to capture the Arnhem Bridge across the Rhine River in Holland.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Arnhem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Arnhem)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 28, 2015, 07:58:44 AM
1874  Colonel Ronald Mackenzie raids a war camp of Comanche and Kiowa at the Battle of Palo Duro Canyon, Texas, slaughtering 2,000 of their horses.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on September 28, 2015, 11:42:38 AM
1928 – Sir Alexander Fleming notices a bacteria-killing mold growing in his laboratory, discovering what later became known as penicillin.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 28, 2015, 05:41:38 PM
Sept. 28 1969,
A meteorite fell over Murchison, Australia. Only 100-kg of this meteorite has been recovered. Classified as a carbonaceous chondrite, type II (CM2), this meteorite is suspected to be of cometary origin due to its high water content (12%). An abundance of amino acids found within this meteorite has led to intense study by researchers as to its origins. More than 92 different amino acids have been identified within the Murchison meteorite to date. Nineteen of these are found on Earth. The remaining amino acids have no apparent terrestrial source.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on September 28, 2015, 08:52:25 PM
9/28/94

My son William T. was born at 6:30 am.

At 8:00 pm, I was at The Grateful Dead in Boston.

He loves the band now.

How many 21 year olds have a Dead t shirt from the day they were born??
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 29, 2015, 05:37:37 AM
Sept. 28, 1976,
Enjoying his own birthday celebrations singer Jerry Lee Lewis accidentally shot his bass player Norman Owens in the chest. Lewis had been blasting holes in an office door. Owens survived but sued his boss.
Happy Birthday, Killa!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 29, 2015, 06:39:57 AM
1962  Canada launches its first satellite, Alouette 1.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 30, 2015, 06:13:41 AM
Film Icon James Dean Killed in Car Crash (1955)

Though he would become one of the most iconic actors in the history of Hollywood, Dean starred in only three movies—East of Eden, Rebel Without a Cause, and Giant. The moody actor was acclaimed as the epitome of the mid-1950s, representing the alienated American youth of the time. In 1955, his career and life were cut short when he was killed in a highway crash while driving his Porsche to compete in a racing event. He was just 24. What "curse" is associated with his death?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on September 30, 2015, 06:14:30 AM
Todays birthday.


Truman Capote (1924)

Capote's first novel, Other Voices, Other Rooms, launched a literary career that included the novella Breakfast at Tiffany's and his innovative "nonfiction novel" In Cold Blood, a chilling account of the senseless, brutal murder of a Kansas family that is widely considered his finest work. Capote cultivated celebrity and was famous in later years for his jet-setting lifestyle as well as his writing. Capote was reportedly the inspiration for a character in what famous novel?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on September 30, 2015, 07:14:26 AM
1962   U.S.Marshals escort James H. Meredith into the University of Mississippi; two die in the mob violence that follows.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 30, 2015, 03:51:05 PM
Sept. 30, 1978
Aarno Lamminparras, an unemployed home building contractor, hijacks Finnair Flight 405, a Sud Aviation SE-210 Caravelle with 47 other people on board flying from Oulu to Helsinki, Finland. At Helsinki, he allows 34 passengers off the plane, which he then forces to fly back to Oulu, where he receives a ransom payment from Finnair, then back to Helsinki, where he receives more money from a Finnish newspaper and releases the remaining 11 passengers. The aircraft then flies to Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, refuels, and returns to Helsinki for more ransom money from the newspaper before flying on to Oulu, where he releases his final three hostages in exchange for a chauffered limousine ride home and 24 hours alone with his wife. Police storm his house and arrest him.
 :facepalm:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: radon222 on September 30, 2015, 04:06:23 PM
Film Icon James Dean Killed in Car Crash (1955)

Though he would become one of the most iconic actors in the history of Hollywood, Dean starred in only three movies—East of Eden, Rebel Without a Cause, and Giant. The moody actor was acclaimed as the epitome of the mid-1950s, representing the alienated American youth of the time. In 1955, his career and life were cut short when he was killed in a highway crash while driving his Porsche to compete in a racing event. He was just 24. What "curse" is associated with his death?


In related news... some dude says he knows where the Porshe is buried behind a false wall:

http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2015/09/29/james-dean-porsche-found-man-claims-knows-where-car-is-hidden/ (http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2015/09/29/james-dean-porsche-found-man-claims-knows-where-car-is-hidden/)

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on September 30, 2015, 04:47:54 PM
Always wanted a 550 Spyder, but even a good replica is outta reach.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on September 30, 2015, 07:39:21 PM
That is a gorgeous car.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: squeezer on September 30, 2015, 09:18:10 PM
My all time favorite Porsche.

I saw that a restored '55 was sold at auction a few years ago for only $3,685,000.00.  But I think you can pick one up for around $500,000.00 if you shop around.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 01, 2015, 06:08:39 AM
Oct. 1, 1969,
The French Concorde prototype 001 broke the sound barrier for its first time. The inaugural flight of the aircraft had taken place on 2 Mar 1969 in Toulouse, France. The first commercial passenger supersonic flights on 21 Jan 1976 of the British and French Concorde jets marked a brilliant technological achievement. The Concorde was the world's first airplane to be entirely controlled by computer. At first, environmental groups denounced the Concorde's noise during takeoff and its fuel consumption. Its impact on international air travel was limited by the high costs of operating the aircraft. Only British Airways and Air France operated the aircraft. Their service ended with final passenger flights on 24 Oct 2003.
There is now a credible effort by private interests to restore Concorde F-BTSD.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 01, 2015, 07:14:34 AM
1878       
General Lew Wallace is sworn in as governor of New Mexico Territory. He went on to deal with the Lincoln County War, Billy the Kid and write Ben-Hur. His Civil War heroics earned him the moniker Savior of Cincinnati.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 02, 2015, 01:46:38 AM
Oct. 1, 1969,
The French Concorde prototype 001 broke the sound barrier for its first time. The inaugural flight of the aircraft had taken place on 2 Mar 1969 in Toulouse, France. The first commercial passenger supersonic flights on 21 Jan 1976 of the British and French Concorde jets marked a brilliant technological achievement. The Concorde was the world's first airplane to be entirely controlled by computer. At first, environmental groups denounced the Concorde's noise during takeoff and its fuel consumption. Its impact on international air travel was limited by the high costs of operating the aircraft. Only British Airways and Air France operated the aircraft. Their service ended with final passenger flights on 24 Oct 2003.
There is now a credible effort by private interests to restore Concorde F-BTSD.
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One of the main reasons for its relative lack of success was lobbying against it by American airlines-it wasn't allowed to go supersonic over the USA.

But-there's a new one on its way!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 02, 2015, 05:13:44 AM
Oct. 2,1721,
The first record of the importation of an African camel into America was an advertisement in the Boston Gazzette, announcing that the camel was being exhibited in Boston, Mass., and that it stood 7 feet high and 12 feet long. The first commercial importation of a number of camels into the U.S. was made in 1856 to be used for military purposes following an appropriation of $30,000 made by Congress on 3 Mar 1855.
You can't make this stuff up...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 02, 2015, 03:09:40 PM
Pasilalinic-Sympathetic Compass Demonstrated (1851)

French occultist Jacques Toussaint Benoit's pasilalinic-sympathetic compass was a contraption developed based on his belief that when two snails touch, they create a telepathic bond. His "snail telegraph" contained 24 snails, each associated with an individual letter of the alphabet as well as with a snail counterpart in a second device. One could theoretically transmit a message by touching the snails, eliciting reactions from their counterparts. What happened when he demonstrated his device? More... Discuss
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 02, 2015, 05:37:28 PM
What happened when he demonstrated his device?
The snails all disappeared along with a pound of butter and a bulb of garlic from the kitchen.

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 03, 2015, 10:37:10 AM
If the glove don't fix you must acquit

O.J. Simpson Found Not Guilty in the "Trial of the Century" (1995)

In 1994, Simpson, a former football star, was charged with the murder of his estranged wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman. His trial was a media-saturated event that highlighted racial tensions in America and resulted in his acquittal in 1995. In 1997, a civil jury levied a $33.5 million wrongful-death award against him in a suit brought by the victims' families. Simpson's infamous car chase in June 1994 interrupted TV coverage of what?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on October 03, 2015, 02:00:29 PM
I'll go out on a limb and say, Merv Griffin.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 03, 2015, 03:40:32 PM
Oct. 3, 1991,
Texas governor Ann Richards proclaimed October 3, Stevie Ray Vaughan, (Stevie Ray Vaughan's birthday), to be "Stevie Ray Vaughan Day". An annual motorcycle ride and concert in Central Texas benefits the Stevie Ray Vaughan Memorial Scholarship Fund.
RIP Stevie,
http://youtu.be/H7ZPMScX9-k (http://youtu.be/H7ZPMScX9-k)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on October 03, 2015, 04:08:26 PM
IMHO his best. Ironically, it's acoustic.

I got to see him at Auditorium Shores in 1985.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 03, 2015, 04:42:26 PM
IMHO his best.
That was my thought too.
One of (very few) of my life's regrets is not seeing him live...
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 03, 2015, 04:46:02 PM
I saw SRV at the AZ state fair.  He was great!  I cannot pinpoint a best song.  I like them all.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 04, 2015, 05:46:32 AM
Oct. 4 1970,
Janis Joplin was found dead at the Landmark Hotel Hollywood after an accidental heroin overdose. Joplin had the posthumous 1971 US No.1 single 'Me And Bobby McGee', and the 1971 US No.1 album 'Pearl'. She was known as "The Queen of Psychedelic Soul" and as "Pearl" to her friends, Joplin remains one of the top-selling musicians in the United States, with over 15.5 million albums sold in the USA.
RIP Pearl.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 04, 2015, 07:12:58 AM
I'm pretty sure most heroin overdoses are accidental.

Sent from my XT1058 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on October 04, 2015, 10:11:17 AM
I'm pretty sure most heroin overdoses are accidental.

I've read books.

I've seen movies.

Many are hit men covering their tracks.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 06, 2015, 06:27:48 AM
Oct. 6, 1997,
American biology professor Stanley B. Prusiner won the Nobel Prize for medicine for discovering “prions,” described as “an entirely new genre of disease-causing agents.” The name means “proteinaceous infectious particle.” Prions cause brain diseases such as BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or “mad cow disease”); the human variant Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease; kuru among some peoples in New Guinea; and scrapie in sheep and goats. Prions are too small to be seen with normal microscopy. They are self-replicating, but contain no nucleic acid. Prions are highly resistant to destruction or denaturation by common chemical and physical agents such as disinfectants, formalin, heat, UV or ionizing radiation. Incineration of infected tissues requires a temperature never below 900ºF for four hours.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 06, 2015, 07:40:33 AM
1014  The Byzantine Emperor Basil earns the title "Slayer of Bulgers" after he orders the blinding of 15,000 Bulgerian troops.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 06, 2015, 02:08:26 PM
6th October did not exist in 1582 – because of the implementation of the Gregorian calendar
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on October 07, 2015, 05:05:58 AM
6th October did not exist in 1582 – because of the implementation of the Gregorian calendar
Not entirely true, it took a while for the Gregorian calendar to be implemented everywhere, well into the 18th century in fact.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 07, 2015, 05:27:35 AM
Oct. 7, 1957
A fire in the Windscale plutonium production reactor (later called Sellafield) north of Liverpool, England, spreads radioactive iodine and polonium through the countryside and into the Irish Sea. Livestock in the immediate area were destroyed, along with 500,000 gallons of milk. At least 30, and possibly as many as 1,000, cancer deaths were subsequently linked to the accident.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: coho on October 07, 2015, 10:18:03 AM
6th October did not exist in 1582 – because of the implementation of the Gregorian calendar
Not entirely true, it took a while for the Gregorian calendar to be implemented everywhere, well into the 18th 20th century in fact.

Greece held out until 1923. :eek:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Veefer800canuck on October 07, 2015, 11:02:50 AM
Oct. 7, 1957
A fire in the Windscale plutonium production reactor (later called Sellafield) north of Liverpool, England, spreads radioactive iodine and polonium through the countryside and into the Irish Sea. Livestock in the immediate area were destroyed, along with 500,000 gallons of milk. At least 30, and possibly as many as 1,000, cancer deaths were subsequently linked to the accident.

This was so crazy. They had modified the fuel rods so many times to increase reactor output and use different fuels, and when it finally went out of control, they had no way of putting the fire out.

Dousing it with water was incredibly risky and could have caused a HUGE steam explosion with a resulting ejection of enormous amounts of radioactive materials.

Between Windscale, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Fukushima and others, it makes a good case for Thorium reactors.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on October 07, 2015, 11:52:23 AM
But doesn't that increase the risk of a thorium web?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 07, 2015, 02:58:49 PM
6th October did not exist in 1582 – because of the implementation of the Gregorian calendar
Not entirely true, it took a while for the Gregorian calendar to be implemented everywhere, well into the 18th 20th century in fact.

Greece held out until 1923. :eek:

I just thought it sounded better...


1763 – King George III of the United Kingdom issues the Royal Proclamation of 1763, closing aboriginal lands in North America north and west of Alleghenies to white settlements.

Well, that worked nicely.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on October 07, 2015, 03:36:18 PM
1763 – King George III of the United Kingdom issues the Royal Proclamation of 1763, closing aboriginal lands in North America north and west of Alleghenies to white settlements.

Well, that worked nicely.
No one puts Baby in the corner!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 08, 2015, 05:54:48 AM
1918  US Army corporal Alvin C. York kills 28 German soldiers and captures 132 in the Argonne Forest; promoted to sergeant and awarded US Medal of Honor and French Croix de Guerre.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 08, 2015, 06:41:57 AM
October 8, 1967
The first helicopter gunship designed as such to see combat, the U. S. Army’s AH-1G Cobra, flies its first combat mission when two AH-1 Gs operating over South Vietnam escort U. S. Army transport helicopters, then support South Vietnamese troops by destroying four enemy fortifications and sinking 14 sampans.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on October 09, 2015, 08:05:43 AM
144 years ago marks the second day of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Chicago_Fire
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 09, 2015, 08:36:17 AM
Supernova 1604 First Observed (1604)

A supernova is a rare celestial phenomenon involving the explosion of a star, resulting in an extremely bright, short-lived object that emits vast amounts of energy. The last supernova to be observed in the Milky Way was seen in 1604 by Johannes Kepler and was used by Galileo, at his trial, as evidence against the presupposition that the universe never changes. Visible to the naked eye, it was brighter at its peak than any other star in the night sky. How far from Earth was this supernova?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 09, 2015, 08:50:26 AM
How far from Earth was this supernova?

Almost far enough.  :willy:

It's John Entwistle's Birthday!
HBd Ox!!
http://youtu.be/80dsyo2Ox-0 (http://youtu.be/80dsyo2Ox-0)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 10, 2015, 04:01:56 AM
1582 – Because of the implementation of the Gregorian calendar this day does not exist in this year in Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 10, 2015, 05:28:28 AM
October 10, 1962
Vickers Viscount CF-THA was involved in a ground collision with CF-101 Voodoo 17452 of the Royal Canadian Air Force at RCAF Station Bagotville. The Voodoo had been given clearance to take-off before the Viscount had cleared the runway. It collided with the tail of the Viscount, killing a flight attendant and a passenger. The crew of the Voodoo ejected as the aircraft had been set on fire as a result of the collision. The Viscount was substantially damaged but it was repaired and returned to service.
Withdrawn from service by Wabush Mines and stored in September 1976 with a total time of 21,921 hours. Broken up for scrap circa October 1978.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 10, 2015, 06:10:56 AM
1985  An Egyptian plane carrying hijackers of the Achille Lauro cruise ship is intercepted by US Navy F-14s and forced to land at a NATO base in Sicily.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 11, 2015, 06:13:12 AM
Oct. 11 1881,
Roll film for cameras was patented by David H. Houston, who was a Scottish immigrant that travelled to homestead in Dakota (1879) on a 400-acre farm, 30 miles NE of Fargo. His many patents ranged from a disc plow to a portable camera. George Eastman bought 21 patents on cameras from him, including the invention that made Houston famous - a portable camera designed in 1879, for which Houston received $5000 plus monthly royalties for life. This camera suited the everyday person, rather than a professional photographer's big studio camera on wheels. First sold by Eastman in 1881 for $25, the Kodak camera came loaded with a 100-exposure film that Houston would process and reload the camera for $10. Houston died a rich man in 1906.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 11, 2015, 06:22:46 AM
1972  Race riot breaks out aboard carrier USS Kitty Hawk off Vietnam during Operation Linebacker.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 11, 2015, 08:21:07 AM
In the US:
1968 – Apollo program: NASA launches Apollo 7, the first successful manned Apollo mission, with astronauts Wally Schirra, Donn F. Eisele and Walter Cunningham aboard.

In the UK:
1982 – The Mary Rose, a Tudor carrack which sank on July 19, 1545, is salvaged from the sea bed of the Solent, off Portsmouth.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on October 11, 2015, 10:18:49 AM
1972  Race riot breaks out aboard carrier USS Kitty Hawk off Vietnam during Operation Linebacker.

And spilled over elsewhere. When I arrived in Korea in '74/'75 they still had precautions in place to mitigate another outbreak off base.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 11, 2015, 10:33:20 AM

1982 – The Mary Rose, a Tudor carrack which sank on July 19, 1545, is salvaged from the sea bed of the Solent, off Portsmouth.
A ripping tale, with recovery of significant historical data.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 12, 2015, 06:15:45 AM
October 12, 1968,
Big Brother And The Holding Company went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'Cheap Thrills'. The cover, drawn by underground cartoonist Robert Crumb, replaced the band's original idea, a picture of the group naked in bed together. Crumb had originally intended his art to be the LP's back cover, but Joplin demanded that Columbia Records use it for the front cover. Initially the album title was to have been Sex, Dope and Cheap Thrills, but this didn't go down too well at Columbia Records.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 12, 2015, 06:52:03 AM
1984  The Provisional Irish Republican Army detonates a bomb at the Grand Hotel in Brighton, England, in an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher; 5 others are killed and 31 wounded.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 12, 2015, 07:29:47 AM
Iron Lung Used for the First Time (1928)

Invented by engineer Philip Drinker, an iron lung is a device that can produce artificial respiration for extended periods of time. It consists of an airtight metal tank that encloses nearly the entire body and forces the lungs to inhale and exhale by regulating changes in air pressure. Developed for the treatment of coal gas poisoning and first used to save an unconscious child in respiratory failure, the device was eventually most widely used for the treatment of what disease?
Title: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on October 12, 2015, 07:46:33 AM
Poliomyelitis

Which reminds me; the kids have vaccinations today.

Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 12, 2015, 12:31:54 PM
1492 – Christopher Columbus's expedition makes landfall in the Caribbean, specifically in The Bahamas. The explorer believes he has reached the Indies.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 12, 2015, 05:27:57 PM
October 12, 1968,
Big Brother And The Holding Company went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'Cheap Thrills'. The cover, drawn by underground cartoonist Robert Crumb, replaced the band's original idea, a picture of the group naked in bed together. Crumb had originally intended his art to be the LP's back cover, but Joplin demanded that Columbia Records use it for the front cover. Initially the album title was to have been Sex, Dope and Cheap Thrills, but this didn't go down too well at Columbia Records.
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dude
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 13, 2015, 05:36:39 AM
October 13, 1812
At the Battle of Queenston Heights, a Canadian (volunteers and Indigenous warriors) and British army regulars) defeat the American who have tried to invade Canada.
 :razz:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on October 13, 2015, 10:49:51 AM
October 12, 1968,
Big Brother And The Holding Company went to No.1 on the US album chart with 'Cheap Thrills'. The cover, drawn by underground cartoonist Robert Crumb, replaced the band's original idea, a picture of the group naked in bed together. Crumb had originally intended his art to be the LP's back cover, but Joplin demanded that Columbia Records use it for the front cover. Initially the album title was to have been Sex, Dope and Cheap Thrills, but this didn't go down too well at Columbia Records.
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I had that album!  When it first released!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on October 13, 2015, 10:52:05 AM
Iron Lung Used for the First Time (1928)

Invented by engineer Philip Drinker, an iron lung is a device that can produce artificial respiration for extended periods of time. It consists of an airtight metal tank that encloses nearly the entire body and forces the lungs to inhale and exhale by regulating changes in air pressure. Developed for the treatment of coal gas poisoning and first used to save an unconscious child in respiratory failure, the device was eventually most widely used for the treatment of what disease?

polio?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 13, 2015, 02:36:26 PM
Paul Simon (1941) entered the world.

Simon is an American singer and songwriter who first gained fame as half of the duo Simon and Garfunkel. Simon first met Art Garfunkel in sixth grade at their public school in Queens, New York. The two began performing together in the 1950s, using the name Tom and Jerry. After a break, they reunited in 1964 as Simon and Garfunkel but split again in 1970, not long after their highly successful album Bridge over Troubled Water was released. What albums did Simon record as a solo artist?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on October 13, 2015, 05:47:42 PM
Graceland is the biggest one to come to mind. That album was a family road trip favorite, along with Tom Petty's Full Moon Fever.


Sent through subspace from the U.S.S. Enterprise.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on October 13, 2015, 08:38:12 PM
October 13, 1812
At the Battle of Queenston Heights, a Canadian (volunteers and Indigenous warriors) and British army regulars) defeat the American who have tried to invade Canada.
 :razz:

Not that surprising.  If there were two Americans, Canada would be ours.   :bigsmile:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on October 13, 2015, 09:06:14 PM
October 13, 1812
At the Battle of Queenston Heights, a Canadian (volunteers and Indigenous warriors) and British army regulars) defeat the American who have tried to invade Canada.
 :razz:

Not that surprising.  If there were two Americans, Canada would be ours.   :bigsmile:

I was thinking something along the same lines.  :lol:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: squeezer on October 13, 2015, 10:22:51 PM
October 13, 1812
At the Battle of Queenston Heights, a Canadian (volunteers and Indigenous warriors) and British army regulars) defeat the American who have tried to invade Canada.
 :razz:

Not that surprising.  If there were two Americans, Canada would be ours.   :bigsmile:

Which means Justin Bieber would be ours too. And Canadian Football.

Here's a  :beerchug:  to our Canadian heroes!
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 14, 2015, 05:37:55 AM
World's Oldest Surviving Film Shot (1888)

Roundhay Garden Scene is an 1888 short film directed by French inventor Louis Le Prince, who is widely recognized as the world's first filmmaker. Recorded at 12 frames per second, it is the earliest surviving film, predating efforts by Thomas Edison and the Lumière brothers. However, Le Prince was never able to capitalize on his innovation—he disappeared in 1890 while on his way to publicly exhibit the film. How long are the existing copies of the film?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 14, 2015, 05:40:29 AM
October 13, 1812
At the Battle of Queenston Heights, a Canadian (volunteers and Indigenous warriors) and British army regulars) defeat the American who have tried to invade Canada.
 :razz:

Not that surprising.  If there were two Americans, Canada would be ours.   :bigsmile:

Which means Justin Bieber would be ours too. And Canadian Football.

Here's a  :beerchug:  to our Canadian heroes!

As long as Bieber pays his US taxes he is AOk :bigok:  I need someone to fund social security so I can have some money when I retire.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 14, 2015, 05:45:39 AM

Here's a  :beerchug:  to our Canadian heroes!
Thanks!
My nephew has sand in his boots again, second tour.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 14, 2015, 05:57:58 AM

As long as Bieber pays his US taxes he is AOk :bigok:  I need someone to fund social security so I can have some money when I retire.
:rolf: :rolf: :rolf:
Silly wabbit.
Spoiled rich folk don't pay taxes.

Oct. 12, 1947
Test pilot Chuck Yeager breaks the sound barrier aboard a Bell X-1 rocket plane.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 14, 2015, 07:41:26 AM
2012  Felix Baumgartner breaks the world record for highest manned balloon flight, highest parachute jump, and greatest free-fall velocity, parachuting from an altitude of approximately 24 miles (39km).
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Bounce on October 14, 2015, 10:21:56 AM
Oct. 12, 1947
Test pilot Chuck Yeager breaks the sound barrier aboard a Bell X-1 rocket plane.

I remember watching every bit of news and film clips on the X-15 as they were broadcast when I was a child.

X-15 8 June 1959 - December 1968
Quote
As of September 2015, the X-15 holds the official world record for the highest speed ever reached by a manned, powered aircraft. Its maximum speed was 4,520 miles per hour (7,274 km/h), or Mach 6.72.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 15, 2015, 06:18:52 AM
October 15, 1967
The first Sacramento Pop Festival took place, featuring Jefferson Airplane, Spirit, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, and the Strawberry Alarm Clock.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 16, 2015, 05:24:35 AM
October 16, 2006,
CBGB, the legendary New York punk club credited with discovering Patti Smith and Ramones, closed after a final gig by Smith herself. Blondie and Talking Heads also found fame after performing at the club, which helped launch US punk music. The venue first opened in December 1973, its full name CBGB OMFUG standing for "country, bluegrass, blues and other music for uplifting gormandizers". Ya, right...
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 16, 2015, 07:34:10 AM
1793  Queen Marie Antoinette is beheaded by guillotine during the French Revolution.
She could have escaped to England if she hadn't "needed" so much stuff, and overloaded the coach. Caught before getting to the coast
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on October 16, 2015, 09:54:09 AM
1793  Queen Marie Antoinette is beheaded by guillotine during the French Revolution.
She could have escaped to England if she hadn't "needed" so much stuff, and overloaded the coach. Caught before getting to the coast

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 17, 2015, 05:30:28 AM
With apologies to Ed (in case it really is his birthday), nothing of any great import happened today.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 17, 2015, 08:15:32 PM
Rita Hayworth (1918)
Margarita Cansino began her show business career as a child, dancing flamenco with her well-known father, Eduardo. After taking acting lessons, changing her last name to Hayworth, and dying her hair its trademark red, she began her acting career. Her appearance in a series of musicals made her a star, and her role in Gilda confirmed her status as a Hollywood sex symbol, making her one of the most popular wartime pinups. Hayworth's picture is rumored to have been placed on what weapon?

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 17, 2015, 11:38:56 PM
Alaska Day
Alaska Day commemorates the formal transfer of Alaska from Russia to the United States on October 18, 1867. The event, which took place at Sitka, was a sad one for the Russian colonists who had already made Alaska their home. After the transfer, Alaska was eventually organized as a territory and maintained this status until it became a state on January 3, 1959. Today, the lowering of the Russian flag and the raising of the Stars and Stripes is reenacted every year as part of this festival in Sitka. Other events include a parade and a period costume ball.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 17, 2015, 11:39:23 PM
Lee Harvey Oswald (1939)
Oswald, a US Marine who defected to the Soviet Union only to return and settle in Dallas, Texas, with his Russian wife and daughter, is widely believed to have been the assassin of US President John F. Kennedy. On November 22, 1963, Oswald allegedly fired three shots from a window on the sixth floor of the Texas State School Book Depository, killing Kennedy. While in police custody, Oswald was murdered by nightclub owner Jack Ruby. Whom did Oswald allegedly try to assassinate earlier in 1963?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 18, 2015, 05:51:12 AM
Oct. 18, 1877
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada,
Hugh C. Baker, Charles D. Cory, T. C. Mewburn and Mrs. I. R. Thompson get the world's first telephone service, installed by the Bell Company.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 18, 2015, 07:18:52 AM
Rita Hayworth (1918)
Margarita Cansino began her show business career as a child, dancing flamenco with her well-known father, Eduardo. After taking acting lessons, changing her last name to Hayworth, and dying her hair its trademark red, she began her acting career. Her appearance in a series of musicals made her a star, and her role in Gilda confirmed her status as a Hollywood sex symbol, making her one of the most popular wartime pinups. Hayworth's picture is rumored to have been placed on what weapon?

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http://youtu.be/mz3CPzdCDws (http://youtu.be/mz3CPzdCDws)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 18, 2015, 07:27:33 AM
1989  The worst earthquake in 82 years strikes San Francisco bay area minutes before the start of a World Series game there. The earthquake registers 6.9 on the Richter scale–67 are killed and damage is estimated at $10 billion.

The only quake that scared me,when I lived there. :eek:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 18, 2015, 01:10:24 PM
Rita Hayworth (1918)
Margarita Cansino began her show business career as a child, dancing flamenco with her well-kn
own father, Eduardo. After taking acting lessons, changing her last name to Hayworth, and dying her hair its trademark red, she began her acting career. Her appearance in a series of musicals made her a star, and her role in Gilda confirmed her status as a Hollywood sex symbol, making her one of the most popular wartime pinups. Hayworth's picture is rumored to have been placed on what weapon?

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[url]http://youtu.be/mz3CPzdCDws[/url] ([url]http://youtu.be/mz3CPzdCDws[/url])


She liked to show off her undies :leghump:
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: jadziadax8 on October 18, 2015, 02:44:17 PM
Hayworth's picture is rumored to have been placed on what weapon?

I'm pretty sure I heard it was on one of the atomic bombs, but I don't know if it was Fat Man or Little Boy.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 19, 2015, 07:44:18 AM
1781  Major General Lord Charles Cornwallis surrenders to George Washington and Count de Rochambeau at Yorktown, Va. Cornwallis surrenders 7,157 troops, including sick and wounded, and 840 sailors, along with 244 artillery pieces. Losses in this battle had been light on both sides. The Revolutionary War is effectively ended.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 21, 2015, 05:39:08 AM
HMAS Australia Is First Ship Ever Hit by Kamikaze Attack (1944)

In Japanese, kamikaze means "divine wind," a reference to the typhoon that foiled the Mongol invasion of Japan in 1281. In World War II, the term was used for Japanese pilots who made deliberate suicidal crashes into enemy targets. Such attacks sank 34 ships and damaged hundreds, killing thousands. In the lead up to the Battle of Leyte Gulf, the Royal Australian Navy's HMAS Australia became perhaps the first ship damaged by a kamikaze. How many kamikaze attacks did it survive?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 23, 2015, 05:56:35 AM
October 23, 1962
Operation Blue Moon, six U. S. Navy RF-8 Crusader photographic reconnaissance aircraft flying from Key West, Florida, conduct the first American low-level flights over Cuba, flying at 400 mph (644 km/hr) only a few hundred feet off the ground.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 23, 2015, 08:00:06 AM
1641  Rebellion in Ireland. Catholics, under Phelim O’Neil, rise against the Protestants and massacred men, women and children to the number of 40,000 (some say 100,000).
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 23, 2015, 03:10:50 PM
HMAS Australia Is First Ship Ever Hit by Kamikaze Attack (1944)

In Japanese, kamikaze means "divine wind," a reference to the typhoon that foiled the Mongol invasion of Japan in 1281. In World War II, the term was used for Japanese pilots who made deliberate suicidal crashes into enemy targets. Such attacks sank 34 ships and damaged hundreds, killing thousands. In the lead up to the Battle of Leyte Gulf, the Royal Australian Navy's HMAS Australia became perhaps the first ship damaged by a kamikaze. How many kamikaze attacks did it survive?

Do tell.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 23, 2015, 03:14:56 PM
1642 – Battle of Edgehill: First major battle of the First English Civil War.

Actually, this is bollocks. The English had had several civil wars prior to this, for example, Stephen and Matilda (when Christ and all his saints slept) and the Wars of the Roses, on which that TV series is based.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 24, 2015, 06:05:21 AM
Oct.24, 1901
Anna Edson Taylor, 43, is the first woman to go safely over Niagara Falls in a barrel. She made the attempt for the cash award offered, which she put toward the loan on her Texas ranch.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: JonS on October 24, 2015, 08:03:43 AM
1929  Black Thursday–the first day of the stock market crash which began the Great Depression.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 25, 2015, 05:47:09 AM
October 25, 1966,
 Aged 7 months old, Jeff Healey had his right eye surgically removed (and subsequently his left eye, 4 months later), and replaced with artificial ones, necessitated by a form of cancer of the eyes called retinoblastoma. Three years later Healey was given his first guitar by his father. At the age of 13, the Canadian guitarist formed  in his first band, Blue Direction.
http://youtu.be/hlPW6KhWCwU (http://youtu.be/hlPW6KhWCwU)
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: sodapop6620 on October 25, 2015, 08:40:40 AM
Pablo Picasso (1881)

Among the most influential figures in 20th-century art, Picasso was a Spanish-born French artist and a founder of cubism. A prolific artist, he is best known for works from his so-called Blue Period and Rose Period, as well the enormous Guernica, whose violent imagery—inspired by the Spanish Civil War—condemned the useless destruction of life. Often a controversial figure for both his art and his politics, Picasso was once questioned about the theft of what famous painting?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 25, 2015, 10:25:01 AM
1983 – Operation Urgent Fury: The United States and its Caribbean allies invade Grenada, six days after Prime Minister Maurice Bishop and several of his supporters are executed in a coup d'état.

Should never have happened.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on October 25, 2015, 10:49:46 AM
1983 – Operation Urgent Fury: The United States and its Caribbean allies invade Grenada, six days after Prime Minister Maurice Bishop and several of his supporters are executed in a coup d'état.

Should never have happened.

I honestly don't know much about this.  Why?
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 25, 2015, 11:03:49 AM
Watch Heartbreak Ridge. Clint Eastwood sums it all up for you.

Sent from my XT1058 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 25, 2015, 11:26:15 AM
1983 – Operation Urgent Fury: The United States and its Caribbean allies invade Grenada, six days after Prime Minister Maurice Bishop and several of his supporters are executed in a coup d'état.

Should never have happened.

I honestly don't know much about this.  Why?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasion_of_Grenada
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: CLAY on October 25, 2015, 12:17:19 PM
1983 – Operation Urgent Fury: The United States and its Caribbean allies invade Grenada, six days after Prime Minister Maurice Bishop and several of his supporters are executed in a coup d'état.

Should never have happened.

I honestly don't know much about this.  Why?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasion_of_Grenada

I actually read all of that and the history of Grenada entry page after reading your post.  While I understand the US certainly may have overstepped it's bounds in invading, the ones that supported the invasion in the UN were Grenada's neighbors (and Israel).  When all the neighbors ask for help, that says something.  While I'd never say the end justifies the means, the country has also been a remarkably stable democracy since the invasion.

  Interesting reading.  Thanks for bringing this up.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: kneescrubber on October 25, 2015, 02:31:33 PM
I'm more interested in the players in the right column.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 25, 2015, 05:03:12 PM
I'm more interested in the players in the right column.

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 ([url]http://s51.photobucket.com/user/pak714/media/Screen%20Shot%202015-10-25%20at%202.27.52%20PM_zpsrfphbwyk.png.html[/url])


If that is frlom the US glovernment replort afterwards, it's not tol be trusted. I tolld ylou this new keybloatd likes the letter L.


Anyway, we beat the French again:

1415 – The army of Henry V of England defeats the French at the Battle of Agincourt.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 26, 2015, 05:25:55 AM
Oct. 26 1991,
Legendary Rock concert promoter Bill Graham was killed when the Bell 206B JetRanger III helicopter he was riding in struck the top of a Pacific Gas and Electric transmission tower near Sears Point, northwest of Vallejo and exploded. The crash, which left the helicopter's wreckage dangling near the top of the towering structure, killed Graham, his girlfriend Melissa Gold and pilot Steve Kahn. Graham had founded the Fillmore theaters in San Francisco and New York and had played key roles in supporting such bands as the Who, The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Janis Joplin, The Band, Bob Dylan, The J. Geils Band, The Allman Brothers Band and The Rolling Stones.
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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Cookie on October 26, 2015, 05:36:02 AM
And the Grateful Dead.

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Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Snowdog on October 26, 2015, 01:40:36 PM
Born this day in 1685 in Naples, Domenico Scarlatti, composer.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: HipGnosis on October 26, 2015, 04:07:31 PM
1983 – Operation Urgent Fury: The United States and its Caribbean allies invade Grenada, six days after Prime Minister Maurice Bishop and several of his supporters are executed in a coup d'état.

Should never have happened.

I honestly don't know much about this.  Why?
I know more about it than most.  I was IN operation ugent fury.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Papa Lazarou on October 26, 2015, 05:21:15 PM
1775 – King George III of Great Britain goes before Parliament to declare the American colonies in rebellion, and authorized a military response to quell the American Revolution.
Title: Re: Today in History
Post by: Flyer on October 27, 2015, 05:56:02 AM
October 27, 1962
Major Rudolf Anderson, a Greenville, South Carolina native and 1948 graduate from Clemson University's cadet corps and pilot with the 4080th Strategic Reconnaissance Wing is tasked with an overflight of Cuba on mission 3128, in a CIA Lockheed U-2F spyplane, remarked with USAF insignia, to take photos of the Soviet SS-N-4 medium-range ballistic missiles (MRBMs) and SS-N-5 intermediate-range ballistic missile (IRBMs) build-ups. Anderson had first qualified on the U-2 type on 3 September 1957. This would be his sixth Cuban overflight. He departed McCoy AFB, Florida at 0909 hrs ET. Contrary to Moscow orders to not engage reconnaissance flights, a single Soviet-manned SA-2 missile battery at Banes fired at Anderson's high-flying U-2F, 56-6676, (Article 343), at 1021 hrs, Havana time (1121